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 Decade: 2000-2009
 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
Low Power FM Radio Service: Regulatory and Congressional Issues
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1984/
Government Access to Phone Calling Activity and Related Records: Legal Authorities
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs9164/
Constitutionality of Applying the FCC's Indecency Restriction to Cable Television
Various federal officials have spoken in favor of extending the Federal Communication Commission’s indecency restriction, which currently applies to broadcast television and radio, to cable and satellite television. This report examines whether such an extension would violate the First Amendment’s guarantee of freedom of speech. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs8234/
Electronic Payments and the U.S. Payments System
This report provides a framework for understanding the paper-based and electronic components of the current U.S. payments system. It begins with a basic overview of the payments system, explaining the relative size and growth of various methods of payment. The report discusses paper-based payments and then examines the operations of wholesale and retail electronic payments. Finally, the report discusses some of the major policy issues concerning the regulation and supervision of electronic payments. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7026/
Military Role in Space Control: A Primer
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6040/
Digital Surveillance: The Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act
The Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act (CALEA, P.L. 103- 414, 47 USC 1001-1010), enacted October 25, 1994, is intended to preserve the ability of law enforcement officials to conduct electronic surveillance effectively and efficiently despite the deployment of new digital technologies and wireless services that have altered the character of electronic surveillance. CALEA requires telecommunications carriers to modify their equipment, facilities, and services, wherever reasonably achievable, to ensure that they are able to comply with authorized electronic surveillance actions. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs9149/
Creating a National Framework for Cybersecurity: An Analysis of Issues and Options
Cyber- security refers to three things: measures to protect information technology; the information it contains, processes, and transmits, and associated physical and virtual elements (which together comprise cyberspace); the degree of protection resulting from application of those measures; and the associated field of professional endeavor. This report aims to examine what kind of national cyber-security framework may be needed and how it might be implemented, and it addresses three questions: 1. Where are the major cyber-security weaknesses currently, and where might weaknesses be anticipated in the future? What are the major means of leverage for addressing those weaknesses? What roles should government and the private sector play in the use of those means of leverage to address current and potential future weaknesses? digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6316/
Telecommunications Services Trade and the WTO Agreement
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2021/
Communications Act Revisions: Selected Issues for Consideration
This report provides an overview of selected topics which the 109th Congress may address in its examination of telecommunications issues. The issues included in this report cover: broadband Internet regulation and access; broadcast indecency; digital television transition; Federal Communications Commission structure and reform; intercarrier compensation; media ownership rules; municipal deployment of broadband; public safety communications, the “savings clause” and monopoly issues; spectrum auctions; and universal service fund reform. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs8121/
Communications Act Revisions: Selected Issues for Consideration
This report provides an overview of selected topics which the 109th Congress may address in its examination of telecommunications issues. The issues included in this report cover: broadband Internet regulation and access; broadcast indecency; digital television transition; Federal Communications Commission structure and reform; intercarrier compensation; media ownership rules; municipal deployment of broadband; public safety communications, the “savings clause” and monopoly issues; spectrum auctions; and universal service fund reform. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7681/
The "E-Rate" Program and Controversies
Passage of the Telecommunications Act of 1996 (P.L. 104-104) codified the long standing policy commitment to ensure universal service in the provision of telecommunications services. The 1996 Act also expanded the concept to include, among other principles, that elementary schools and classrooms, and libraries should have access to telecommunications services for educational purposes at discounted rates. The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) was tasked with implementing the universal provisions of the Act and on May 7, 1997, adopted its order detailing its guidelines. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1326/
Net Neutrality: Background and Issues
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs8960/
Slamming: The Unauthorized Change of a Consumer's Telephone Service Provider
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3485/
Slamming: The Unauthorized Change of a Consumer's Telephone Service Provider
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5523/
Slamming: The Unauthorized Change of a Consumer's Telephone Service Provider
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5522/
Slamming: The Unauthorized Change of a Consumer's Telephone Service Provider
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5521/
Slamming: The Unauthorized Change of a Consumer's Telephone Service Provider
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5520/
Slamming: The Unauthorized Change of a Consumer's Telephone Service Provider
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5519/
Slamming: The Unauthorized Change of a Consumer's Telephone Service Provider
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5518/
Slamming: The Unauthorized Change of a Consumer's Telephone Service Provider
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3487/
Slamming: The Unauthorized Change of a Consumer's Telephone Service Provider
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3486/
Telecommunications Discounts for Schools and Libraries: The "E-Rate" Program and Controversies
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3492/
Telecommunications Discounts for Schools and Libraries: The "E-Rate" Program and Controversies
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3491/
Telecommunications Discounts for Schools and Libraries: The "E-Rate" Program and Controversies
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3490/
Telecommunications Discounts for Schools and Libraries: The "E-Rate" Program and Controversies
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3489/
Telecommunications Discounts for Schools and Libraries: The "E-Rate" Program and Controversies
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3488/
Telecommunications Discounts for Schools and Libraries: The "E-Rate" Program and Controversies
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1983/
Telecommunications Discounts for Schools and Libraries: The "E-Rate" Program and Controversies
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5528/
Telecommunications Discounts for Schools and Libraries: The "E-Rate" Program and Controversies
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5527/
Telecommunications Discounts for Schools and Libraries: The "E-Rate" Program and Controversies
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5526/
Telecommunications Discounts for Schools and Libraries: The "E-Rate" Program and Controversies
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5525/
Telecommunications Discounts for Schools and Libraries: The "E-Rate" Program and Controversies
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5524/
Net Neutrality: Background and Issues
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs10669/
Bundling Residential Telephone, Internet, and Video Services: Issues for Congress
This report discusses bundling and public policy issues for Congress. The federal Universal Service Fund - the federal subsidy program that assures affordable telephone rates for high-cost (rural) and low-income telephone customers as well as for schools, libraries, and rural health facilities - is supported by an assessment on interstate telecommunications revenues only. But it is difficult to identify the portion of revenues generated by a bundled service offering attributable to the interstate telecommunications portion of that bundle. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6070/
Cable and Satellite Television Network Tiering and a la Carte Options for Consumers: Issues for Congress
The large cable programmers, who provide most of the popular cable (and broadcast) television programming, respond that a single large expanded basic service tier represents the most efficient way to offer programming and that allowing customers to obtain networks on an a la carte basis or in small tiers would raise costs – and hence prices to consumers – and also reduce the diversity of programs offered, so that consumer welfare would suffer in the long run. In this report, the pros and cons of offering subscribers only a single large expanded basic service tier and also of the various proposals to provide consumers more options are presented. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6123/
FCC Media Ownership Rules: Issues for Congress
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3943/
FCC Media Ownership Rules: Issues for Congress
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3942/
The FCC's "a la Carte" Reports
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs9957/
The FCC's "a la Carte" Reports
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs9981/
Intercarrier Compensation: One Component of Telecom Reform
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs9128/
Telecommunications Act: Competition, Innovation, and Reform
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7798/
The E-Rate Program: Universal Service Fund Telecommunications Discounts for Schools
This report provides background information on the E-rate program, focusing specifically on its support of schools. It will be revised to reflect any substantive changes in the program. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6068/
Open Access Publishing and Citatation Archives: Background and Controversy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs9400/
The Multi-State Anti-Terrorism Information Exchange (MATRIX) Pilot Project
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6066/
Digital Television: An Overview
Digital television (DTV) is a new television service representing the most significant development in television technology since the advent of color television in the 1950s. DTV can provide sharper pictures, a wider screen, CD-quality sound, better color rendition, and other new services currently being developed. A successful deployment of DTV requires: the development by content providers of compelling digital programming; the delivery of digital signals to consumers by broadcast television stations, as well as cable and satellite television systems; and the widespread purchase and adoption by consumers of digital television equipment. A key issue in the Congressional debate over the digital transition has been addressing the millions of American over-the-air households whose existing analog televisions will require converter boxes in order to receive digital signals when the analog signal is turned off. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs9765/
Digital Television: An Overview
Digital television (DTV) is a new television service representing the most significant development in television technology since the advent of color television in the 1950s. DTV can provide sharper pictures, a wider screen, CD-quality sound, better color rendition, and other new services currently being developed. A successful deployment of DTV requires: the development by content providers of compelling digital programming; the delivery of digital signals to consumers by broadcast television stations, as well as cable and satellite television systems; and the widespread purchase and adoption by consumers of digital television equipment. A key issue in the Congressional debate over the digital transition has been addressing the millions of American over-the-air households whose existing analog televisions will require converter boxes in order to receive digital signals when the analog signal is turned off. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs9335/
Digital Television: An Overview
Digital television (DTV) is a new television service representing the most significant development in television technology since the advent of color television in the 1950s. DTV can provide sharper pictures, a wider screen, CD-quality sound, better color rendition, and other new services currently being developed. A successful deployment of DTV requires: the development by content providers of compelling digital programming; the delivery of digital signals to consumers by broadcast television stations, as well as cable and satellite television systems; and the widespread purchase and adoption by consumers of digital television equipment. A key issue in the Congressional debate over the digital transition has been addressing the millions of American over-the-air households whose existing analog televisions will require converter boxes in order to receive digital signals when the analog signal is turned off. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs8108/
Digital Television: An Overview
Digital television (DTV) is a new television service representing the most significant development in television technology since the advent of color television in the 1950s. DTV can provide sharper pictures, a wider screen, CD-quality sound, better color rendition, and other new services currently being developed. A successful deployment of DTV requires: the development by content providers of compelling digital programming; the delivery of digital signals to consumers by broadcast television stations, as well as cable and satellite television systems; and the widespread purchase and adoption by consumers of digital television equipment. A key issue in the Congressional debate over the digital transition has been addressing the millions of American over-the-air households whose existing analog televisions will require converter boxes in order to receive digital signals when the analog signal is turned off. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs8025/
Digital Television: An Overview
Digital television (DTV) is a new television service representing the most significant development in television technology since the advent of color television in the 1950s. DTV can provide sharper pictures, a wider screen, CD-quality sound, better color rendition, and other new services currently being developed. A successful deployment of DTV requires: the development by content providers of compelling digital programming; the delivery of digital signals to consumers by broadcast television stations, as well as cable and satellite television systems; and the widespread purchase and adoption by consumers of digital television equipment. A key issue in the Congressional debate over the digital transition has been addressing the millions of American over-the-air households whose existing analog televisions will require converter boxes in order to receive digital signals when the analog signal is turned off. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3500/
Digital Television: An Overview
Digital television (DTV) is a new television service representing the most significant development in television technology since the advent of color television in the 1950s. DTV can provide sharper pictures, a wider screen, CD-quality sound, better color rendition, and other new services currently being developed. A successful deployment of DTV requires: the development by content providers of compelling digital programming; the delivery of digital signals to consumers by broadcast television stations, as well as cable and satellite television systems; and the widespread purchase and adoption by consumers of digital television equipment. A key issue in the Congressional debate over the digital transition has been addressing the millions of American over-the-air households whose existing analog televisions will require converter boxes in order to receive digital signals when the analog signal is turned off. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3499/
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