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 Decade: 1990-1999
 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
U.S.-Japanese Trade: The Semiconductor Arrangement

U.S.-Japanese Trade: The Semiconductor Arrangement

Date: May 13, 1993
Creator: Cooper, William H
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Information Superhighway: Status and Issues

The Information Superhighway: Status and Issues

Date: December 2, 1994
Creator: Smith, Marcia S
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Russian Missile Technology and Nuclear Reactor Transfers to Iran

Russian Missile Technology and Nuclear Reactor Transfers to Iran

Date: December 14, 1998
Creator: Goldman, Stuart D; Katzman, Kenneth; Shuey, Robert & Behrens, Carl E
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Intelligence Implications of the Military Technical Revolution

Intelligence Implications of the Military Technical Revolution

Date: May 1, 1995
Creator: Best, Jr., Richard A.
Description: The availability of precise, real-time intelligence has been an integral part of a military technical revolution being implemented by the Department of Defense for post-Cold War conflicts and peacekeeping operations. Providing this intelligence requires new types of equipment, analysis and organizational relationships within the U.S. intelligence community.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Cooperative Research and Development Agreements

Cooperative Research and Development Agreements

Date: November 17, 1998
Creator: Schacht, Wendy H.
Description: A Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) is a mechanism established by P.L. 99-602, the Federal Technology Transfer Act, to allow the transfer of technology, knowledge, and expertise from government laboratories to the private sector for further development and commercialization. The government provides support in the way of overhead for research and development performed in the federal laboratory and is prohibited from providing funding directly to the partner in the collaborative effort. Currently, more than 5,000 CRADAs have been signed. As the 105th Congress determines its approach to science and technology policies, the role of CRADAs continues to be debated within the context of federal support for R&D
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
R&D Partnerships: Government-Industry Collaboration

R&D Partnerships: Government-Industry Collaboration

Date: November 17, 1998
Creator: Schacht, Wendy H.
Description: Efforts by the 104th Congress to eliminate several government-industry-university research and development partnership programs reflected some opposition to federally funded programs designed to facilitate the commercialization of technology. Within the context of the budget decisions, the 106th Congress is expected to again debate the government's role in promoting collaborative ventures focused on generating new products and processes for the marketplace.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Internet Tax Bills in the 105th Congress

Internet Tax Bills in the 105th Congress

Date: August 21, 1998
Creator: Noto, Nonna A.
Description: This report tracks the evolution and content of the Internet tax freedom bills. In general, the bills would impose a federal moratorium on the ability of state and local governments to impose taxes on certain aspects of the Internet and would establish a temporary federal commission to study selected issues and make policy recommendations.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Point & Click: Internet Searching Techniques

Point & Click: Internet Searching Techniques

Date: April 6, 1998
Creator: Tehan, Rita
Description: This report discusses criteria to consider when judging the quality of an internet site and the best strategies for locating information on the World Wide Web. There are two ways to search the Internet. The first is to use subject guides (e.g., Yahoo, Galaxy, or WWW Virtual Library), which are compiled by human indexers. These present an organized hierarchy of categories so a searcher can “drill down” through their links. The second option is to use a search engine (e.g., Alta Vista, Hotbot, or InfoSeek), an automated software robot which indexes Web pages and retrieves information based on relevancy-ranked algorithms. This report describes how search engines index the World Wide Web, as well as various features common to most search engines. In addition, the report suggests searching tips for retrieving the most precise information. Finally, the report discusses Usenet news groups, email discussion lists, gophers, and miscellaneous Web resources.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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