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 Decade: 1990-1999
 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
A Department of Science and Technology: A Recurring Theme

A Department of Science and Technology: A Recurring Theme

Date: February 3, 1995
Creator: Boesman, William C
Description: Consolidation of many Federal research and development (R&D) activities into a Department of Science and Technology (S&T) has been proposed repeatedly since World War D, including in the last Congress. The trend, however, has been toward the creation of mission agencies with supporting R&D capabilities. Analyses of arguments for and against consolidation indicate that valid reasons exist on both sides of the issue. Specific consolidation proposals may be considered again during the 104th Congress.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Science, Technology, and Medicine: Issues Facing the 105th Congress, First Session

Science, Technology, and Medicine: Issues Facing the 105th Congress, First Session

Date: February 21, 1997
Creator: Rowberg, Richard E
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Science, Technology, and Medicine: Issues Facing the 105th Congress, Second Session

Science, Technology, and Medicine: Issues Facing the 105th Congress, Second Session

Date: September 9, 1998
Creator: Rowberg, Richard E
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Information Superhighway: Status and Issues

The Information Superhighway: Status and Issues

Date: December 2, 1994
Creator: Smith, Marcia S
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Point and Click: Internet Searching Techniques

Point and Click: Internet Searching Techniques

Date: April 6, 1998
Creator: Tehan, Rita
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Cooperative Research and Development Agreements

Cooperative Research and Development Agreements

Date: November 17, 1998
Creator: Schacht, Wendy H.
Description: A Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) is a mechanism established by P.L. 99-602, the Federal Technology Transfer Act, to allow the transfer of technology, knowledge, and expertise from government laboratories to the private sector for further development and commercialization. The government provides support in the way of overhead for research and development performed in the federal laboratory and is prohibited from providing funding directly to the partner in the collaborative effort. Currently, more than 5,000 CRADAs have been signed. As the 105th Congress determines its approach to science and technology policies, the role of CRADAs continues to be debated within the context of federal support for R&D
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Small Business Innovation Research Program

Small Business Innovation Research Program

Date: September 27, 1999
Creator: Schacht, Wendy H
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Intellectual Property Protection for Noncreative Databases

Intellectual Property Protection for Noncreative Databases

Date: September 15, 1999
Creator: Schrader, Dorothy & Jeweler, Robin
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Flat Panel Display (FPD) Technology: An Introduction to the Issues

Flat Panel Display (FPD) Technology: An Introduction to the Issues

Date: December 19, 1994
Creator: McLoughlin, Glenn J & Nunno, Richard M
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Y2K Challenges and Transportation: Risks and Solutions

Y2K Challenges and Transportation: Risks and Solutions

Date: April 30, 1999
Creator: Rothberg, Paul F & Moore, J. Glen
Description: Many companies or governmental entities provide or use transportation systems that are heavily dependent on computers, software, and other technologies that do not have Y2K problems, e.g., they are Y2K compliant or ready. Some transportation systems, however, still use technologies with Y2K problems, which if left uncorrected, could pose safety risks or efficiency concerns on or after January 1, 2000. The extent and nature of those impacts are expected to vary among the modes of transportation and among various providers or users. In addition, Y2K-related problems occurring in the communications and energy industries could reduce the safety and efficiency of some transportation systems in early January 2000. Operations at some foreign ports and international air traffic control systems with Y2K problems also could adversely affect shipments and flights into and out of the United States. The total amount that has been spent to assess and fix Y2K problems affecting transportation is not known, but estimates suggest that at least $1 billion of private sector, transit authority, and federal funds have been or will soon be allocated for that purpose.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department