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 Decade: 2000-2009
 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
Internet: An Overview of Key Technology Policy Issues Affecting Its Use and Growth
The Internet touches almost every aspect of modern life. The extend to which use of the Internet continues to grow, however, may be affected by a number of technology policy issues being debated in Congress. First is the availability of high speed -- or "broadband" -- Internet access. Next are a range of issues that reflect challenges faced by those who do use the Internet, such as security, privacy, unsolicited commercial electronic mail ("spam"), protecting children from unsuitable material, and computer security, including the vulnerability of the national infrastructure. Other issues include the governance of the Internet's domain name system. The evolving role of the Internet in the political economy of the United States also continues to attract congressional attention. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs10519/
Internet: An Overview of Key Technology Policy Issues Affecting Its Use and Growth
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs9758/
Internet: An Overview of Key Technology Policy Issues Affecting Its Use and Growth
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs8012/
Internet: An Overview of Key Technology Policy Issues Affecting Its Use and Growth
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6365/
Internet: An Overview of Key Technology Policy Issues Affecting Its Use and Growth
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6400/
Internet: An Overview of Key Technology Policy Issues Affecting Its Use and Growth
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6050/
Internet: An Overview of Key Technology Policy Issues Affecting Its Use and Growth
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1320/
Internet: An Overview of Key Technology Policy Issues Affecting Its Use and Growth
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3461/
Internet Domain Names: Background and Policy Issues
This report discusses the Domain Name System (DNS), which is the distributed set of databases residing in computers around the world that contain address numbers mapped to corresponding domain names, making it possible to send and receive messages and to access information from computers anywhere on the Internet. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc29523/
Science and Technology Policy: Issues for the 109th Congress
Science and technology have a pervasive influence over a wide range of issues confronting the nation. Decisions on how much federal funding to invest in research and development (R&D) and determining what programs have the highest priority, for example, may have implications for homeland security, new high technology industries, government/private sector cooperation in R&D, and myriad other areas. This report indicates the sweep of science and technology in many public policy issues, such as global climate change, stem cell research, patent protection, and telecommunications reform. This report also addresses key issues that directly affect, or are affected by, science and technology. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs10385/
Science and Technology Policy: Issues for the 108th Congress, 2nd Session
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6032/
Science and Technology Policy: Issues for the 109th Congress
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6303/
Science and Technology Policy: Issues for the 109th Congress
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs8584/
Science and Technology Policy: Issues for the 107th Congress, Second Session
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3365/
Science and Technology Policy: Issues for the 107th Congress, Second Session
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3364/
Science and Technology Policy: Issues for the 109th Congress
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs9804/
The President's Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP): Issues for Congress
This report discusses the role of the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), including an overview of the history of science and technology advice to the President, issues and options for Congress regarding (OSTP) Director, OSTP management and operations, the President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST), and the National Science and Technology Council (NSTC). The report also discusses actions taken by the Obama Administration regarding OSTP. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc87355/
The National Institute of Standards and Technology: An Overview
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs10131/
Computer Services Personnel: Overtime Pay Under the Fair Labor Standards Act
The Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 (FLSA), as amended, is the primary federal statute in the area of minimum wages and overtime pay. Through administrative rulemaking, the Secretary of Labor has established two tests through which to define eligibility under the Section 13(a)(1) exemption: a duties test and an earnings test. In the 106th Congress, legislation was introduced by Representatives Andrews and Lazio that would have increased the scope of the exemption: first, by expanding the range of exempt job titles, and then, through a relative reduction in the value of the earnings threshold or test. For example, were the minimum wage increased to $6.15 per hour, as pending proposals would do, the value of the computer services exemption threshold would be 4.5 times the federal minimum wage. Ultimately, neither bill was enacted, but the issue has re-emerged as H.R. 1545 (Andrews) and H.R. 546 (Quinn). digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1852/
Industrial Competitiveness and Technological Advancement: Debate Over Government Policy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1104/
The National Institute of Standards and Technology: An Overview
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs10026/
Industrial Competitiveness and Technological Advancement: Debate Over Government Policy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1103/
Industrial Competitiveness and Technological Advancement: Debate Over Government Policy
There is ongoing interest in the pace of U.S. technological advancement due to its influence on U.S. economic growth, productivity, and international competitiveness. Because technology can contribute to economic growth and productivity increases, congressional attention has focused on how to augment private-sector technological development. This report outlines federal efforts to fund technological research and innovations, as well as congressional efforts to eliminate or significantly curtail said efforts. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs10314/
Industrial Competitiveness and Technological Advancement: Debate Over Government Policy
There is ongoing interest in the pace of U.S. technological advancement due to its influence on U.S. economic growth, productivity, and international competitiveness. Because technology can contribute to economic growth and productivity increases, congressional attention has focused on how to augment private-sector technological development. This report outlines federal efforts to fund technological research and innovations, as well as congressional efforts to eliminate or significantly curtail said efforts. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs10315/
Industrial Competitiveness and Technological Advancement: Debate Over Government Policy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1445/
Industrial Competitiveness and Technological Advancement: Debate Over Government Policy
There is ongoing interest in the pace of U.S. technological advancement due to its influence on U.S. economic growth, productivity, and international competitiveness. Because technology can contribute to economic growth and productivity increases, congressional interest has focused on how to augment private-sector technological development. Congressional action has mandated specific technology development programs and obligations in federal agencies that did not initially support such efforts. Some legislative activity, beginning in the 104th Congress, has been directed at eliminating or significantly curtailing many of these federal efforts. Questions have been raised concerning the proper role of the federal government in technology development and the competitiveness of U.S. industry. As the 109th congress continues to develop its budget priorities, how the government encourages technological process in the private sector again may be explored and/or redefined. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs10509/
Industrial Competitiveness and Technological Advancement: Debate Over Government Policy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs8729/
Science and Technology Policy: Issues for the 109th Congress
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs9378/
Industrial Competitiveness and Technological Advancement: Debate Over Government Policy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs9844/
Industrial Competitiveness and Technological Advancement: Debate Over Government Policy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs9845/
Industrial Competitiveness and Technological Advancement: Debate Over Government Policy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5744/
Computer Services Personnel: Overtime Pay Under the Fair Labor Standards Act
The Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 (FLSA), as amended, is the primary federal statute in the area of minimum wages and overtime pay. Through administrative rulemaking, the Secretary of Labor has established two tests through which to define eligibility under the Section 13(a)(1) exemption: a duties test and an earnings test. In the 106th Congress, legislation was introduced by Representatives Andrews and Lazio that would have increased the scope of the exemption: first, by expanding the range of exempt job titles, and then, through a relative reduction in the value of the earnings threshold or test. For example, were the minimum wage increased to $6.15 per hour, as pending proposals would do, the value of the computer services exemption threshold would be 4.5 times the federal minimum wage. Ultimately, neither bill was enacted, but the issue has re-emerged as H.R. 1545 (Andrews) and H.R. 546 (Quinn). digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5102/
Computer Services Personnel: Overtime Pay Under the Fair Labor Standards Act
The Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 (FLSA), as amended, is the primary federal statute in the area of minimum wages and overtime pay. Through administrative rulemaking, the Secretary of Labor has established two tests through which to define eligibility under the Section 13(a)(1) exemption: a duties test and an earnings test. In the 106th Congress, legislation was introduced by Representatives Andrews and Lazio that would have increased the scope of the exemption: first, by expanding the range of exempt job titles, and then, through a relative reduction in the value of the earnings threshold or test. For example, were the minimum wage increased to $6.15 per hour, as pending proposals would do, the value of the computer services exemption threshold would be 4.5 times the federal minimum wage. Ultimately, neither bill was enacted, but the issue has re-emerged as H.R. 1545 (Andrews) and H.R. 546 (Quinn). digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs8222/
Industrial Competitiveness and Technological Advancement: Debate Over Government Policy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2219/
Industrial Competitiveness and Technological Advancement: Debate Over Government Policy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2222/
Industrial Competitiveness and Technological Advancement: Debate Over Government Policy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2221/
Industrial Competitiveness and Technological Advancement: Debate Over Government Policy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2220/
Industrial Competitiveness and Technological Advancement: Debate over Government Policy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6425/
Computer Services Personnel: Overtime Pay Under the Fair Labor Standards Act
The Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 (FLSA), as amended, is the primary federal statute in the area of minimum wages and overtime pay. Through administrative rulemaking, the Secretary of Labor has established two tests through which to define eligibility under the Section 13(a)(1) exemption: a duties test and an earnings test. In the 106th Congress, legislation was introduced by Representatives Andrews and Lazio that would have increased the scope of the exemption: first, by expanding the range of exempt job titles, and then, through a relative reduction in the value of the earnings threshold or test. For example, were the minimum wage increased to $6.15 per hour, as pending proposals would do, the value of the computer services exemption threshold would be 4.5 times the federal minimum wage. Ultimately, neither bill was enacted, but the issue has re-emerged as H.R. 1545 (Andrews) and H.R. 546 (Quinn). digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3224/
Industrial Competitiveness and Technological Advancement: Debate Over Government Policy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7870/
Industrial Competitiveness and Technological Advancement: Debate Over Government Policy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3875/
Industrial Competitiveness and Technological Advancement: Debate Over Government Policy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3877/
Industrial Competitiveness and Technological Advancement: Debate Over Government Policy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3878/
Industrial Competitiveness and Technological Advancement: Debate Over Government Policy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3874/
Industrial Competitiveness and Technological Advancement: Debate Over Government Policy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3876/
Industrial Competitiveness and Technological Advancement: Debate over Government Policy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7044/
Engineered Nanoscale Materials and Derivative Products: Regulatory Challenges
The purpose of this report is to consider certain challenges faced by federal EHS risk assessors, risk managers, and policy makers, and to discuss possible legislative approaches to address those challenges. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc94132/
The U.S. Science and Technology Workforce
This report provides an overview of the status of the U.S. science and technology (S&T) workforce, and identifies some of the issues and options that are currently being discussed in Congress. The report concludes with a summary of some pertinent activities in the 110th Congress. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc94154/
Electronic Commerce: An Introduction
Electronic commercial transactions over the Internet, or “e-commerce,” have grown so fast over the last five years that many experts continue to underestimate its growth and development. Whether retail business-to-customer or business-to-business transactions, e-commerce shows no signs of slowing down. In turn, policymakers both in the United States and abroad are likely to face increasingly complex issues of security, privacy, taxation, infrastructure development and other issues in 2000 and beyond. This report will be updated periodically. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1107/
Net Neutrality: Background and Issues
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs10669/
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