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 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
Federal Estate, Gift, and Generation-Skipping Taxes: A Description of Current Law

Federal Estate, Gift, and Generation-Skipping Taxes: A Description of Current Law

Date: January 4, 2008
Creator: Luckey, John R.
Description: This report contains an explanation of the major provisions of the federal estate, gift, and generation-skipping transfer taxes. The discussion divides the federal estate tax into three components: the gross estate, deductions from the gross estate, and computation of the tax, including allowable tax credits. The federal estate tax is computed through a series of adjustments and modifications of a tax base known as the "gross estate." Certain allowable deductions reduce the gross estate to the "taxable estate," to which is then added the total of all lifetime taxable gifts made by the decedent. The tax rates are applied and, after reduction for certain allowable credits, the amount of tax owed by the estate is reached.
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A History of Federal Estate, Gift, and Generation-Skipping Taxes

A History of Federal Estate, Gift, and Generation-Skipping Taxes

Date: January 3, 2008
Creator: Luckey, John R.
Description: Three primary categories of legislation pertaining to transfer taxes have been introduced in the 110th Congress. As noted above, the repeal of the estate and generation-skipping taxes is not permanent. One category would make the repeal permanent. (See, H.R. 411 and H.R. 2380). Another category would accelerate the repeal of these transfer taxes. (See, H.R. 25, H.R. 1040, H.R. 1586, H.R. 4042, S. 1025, S. 1040, and S. 1081). The third would reinstate these taxes at lower rates and/or in a manner more considerate of family-owned business. (See, H.R. 1928, H.R. 3170, H.R. 3475, H.R. 4172, H.R. 4235, H.R. 4242, and S. 1994). In this report, the history of the federal transfer taxes has been divided into four parts: (1) the federal death and gift taxes used between 1789 and 1915; (2) the development, from 1916 through 1975, of the modern estate and gift taxes; (3) the creation and refinement of a unified estate and gift tax system, supplemented by a generation-skipping transfer tax; and (4) the phaseout and repeal of the estate and generation-skipping taxes, with the gift tax being retained as a device to protect the integrity of the income tax.
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Value-Added Tax: A New U.S. Revenue Source?

Value-Added Tax: A New U.S. Revenue Source?

Date: August 22, 2006
Creator: Bickley, James M
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Legislation in the 109th Congress

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Legislation in the 109th Congress

Date: August 14, 2006
Creator: Sissine, Fred
Description: This report reviews the status of energy efficiency and renewable energy legislation introduced during the 109th Congress. Action in the second session has focused on appropriations bills; the first session focused on omnibus energy policy bill H.R. 6 and several appropriations bills. this report describes several major pieces of legislation, including the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and the Transportation Equity Act. For each bill listed in this report, a brief description and a summary of action are given, including references to committee hearings and reports. Also, a selected list of hearings on renewable energy is included.
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The Retirement Savings Tax Credit: A Fact Sheet

The Retirement Savings Tax Credit: A Fact Sheet

Date: August 7, 2006
Creator: Purcell, Patrick
Description: The Economic Growth and Tax Relief Reconciliation Act of 2001 authorized a non-refundable tax credit of up to $1,000 for eligible individuals who contribute to an IRA or an employer-sponsored retirement plan. The maximum credit is 50% of retirement contributions up to $2,000. This credit can reduce the amount of taxes owed, but the tax credit itself is non-refundable. The maximum credit is the lesser of either $1,000 or the tax that the individual would have owed without the credit. Eligibility is based on the taxpayer's adjusted gross income. The eligible income brackets are not indexed to inflation. Taxpayers under age 18 or who are full-time students are not eligible for the credit.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Advisory Panel's Tax Reform Proposals

The Advisory Panel's Tax Reform Proposals

Date: July 13, 2006
Creator: Gravelle, Jane G.
Description: In early 2005, the President appointed a tax reform advisory panel to formulate tax reform proposals. The report of the President’s Advisory Panel on Tax Reform, issued in November 2005, recommended two reform plans to consider: 1) a revised income tax, referred to as the simplified income tax (SIT); and 2) a consumption tax coupled with a tax on financial income, referred to as the growth and investment tax (GIT). This report discusses the provisions and implications of these two taxes in detail.
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State Corporate Income Taxes: A Description and Analysis

State Corporate Income Taxes: A Description and Analysis

Date: June 30, 2006
Creator: Maguire, Steven
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Alternative Minimum Tax for Individuals

The Alternative Minimum Tax for Individuals

Date: May 22, 2006
Creator: Esenwein, Gregg A.
Description: This report provides a brief overview of the alternative minimum tax (AMT) for individuals, discusses the issues associated with the current system, and describes current legislation to amend the AMT. The report will be updated as legislative action warrants.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Alternative Minimum Tax for Individuals

The Alternative Minimum Tax for Individuals

Date: May 22, 2006
Creator: Esenwein, Gregg A
Description: This report provides a brief overview of the alternative minimum tax (AMT) for individuals, discusses the issues associated with the current system, and describes current legislation to amend the AMT. The report will be updated as legislative action warrants.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Retirement Savings and Household Wealth: Trends from 2001 to 2004

Retirement Savings and Household Wealth: Trends from 2001 to 2004

Date: May 22, 2006
Creator: Purcell, Patrick J
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department