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 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
Economic Analysis of the Charitable Contribution Deduction for Non-Itemizers

Economic Analysis of the Charitable Contribution Deduction for Non-Itemizers

Date: May 19, 2003
Creator: Gravelle, Jane G
Description: This report summarizes the provisions affecting charitable contribution deductions of individuals, and then analyzes the incentive such a deduction would create for increased charitable giving beginning with the original proposal for a relatively low cap and then considering other approaches including the current one. It does not attempt to estimate other types of societal impacts. The non-itemizer’s charitable deduction was the single most important tax provision in the original version of H.R. 7. In S. 1924, S. 476, and the current version of H.R. 7, the nonitemizer provision was temporary and had a higher cap (and a floor). The provision affecting rollovers from IRAs, which can also function as a deduction for nonitemizers, is also discussed briefly.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Economic Analysis of the Charitable Contribution Deduction for Non-Itemizers

Economic Analysis of the Charitable Contribution Deduction for Non-Itemizers

Date: July 14, 2003
Creator: Gravelle, Jane G
Description: This report summarizes the provisions affecting charitable contribution deductions of individuals, and then analyzes the incentive such a deduction would create for increased charitable giving beginning with the original proposal for a relatively low cap and then considering other approaches including the current one. It does not attempt to estimate other types of societal impacts. The non-itemizer’s charitable deduction was the single most important tax provision in the original version of H.R. 7. In S. 1924, S. 476, and the current version of H.R. 7, the nonitemizer provision was temporary and had a higher cap (and a floor). The provision affecting rollovers from IRAs, which can also function as a deduction for nonitemizers, is also discussed briefly.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Economic Analysis of the Charitable Contribution Deduction for Non-Itemizers

Economic Analysis of the Charitable Contribution Deduction for Non-Itemizers

Date: September 9, 2003
Creator: Gravelle, Jane G
Description: This report summarizes the provisions affecting charitable contribution deductions of individuals, and then analyzes the incentive such a deduction would create for increased charitable giving beginning with the original proposal for a relatively low cap and then considering other approaches including the current one. It does not attempt to estimate other types of societal impacts. The non-itemizer’s charitable deduction was the single most important tax provision in the original version of H.R. 7. In S. 1924, S. 476, and the current version of H.R. 7, the nonitemizer provision was temporary and had a higher cap (and a floor). The provision affecting rollovers from IRAs, which can also function as a deduction for nonitemizers, is also discussed briefly.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Economic Analysis of the Charitable Contribution Deduction for Non-Itemizers

Economic Analysis of the Charitable Contribution Deduction for Non-Itemizers

Date: February 28, 2003
Creator: Gravelle, Jane G
Description: This report summarizes the provisions affecting charitable contribution deductions of individuals, and then analyzes the incentive such a deduction would create for increased charitable giving beginning with the original proposal for a relatively low cap and then considering other approaches including the current one. It does not attempt to estimate other types of societal impacts. The non-itemizer’s charitable deduction was the single most important tax provision in the original version of H.R. 7. In S. 1924, S. 476, and the current version of H.R. 7, the nonitemizer provision was temporary and had a higher cap (and a floor). The provision affecting rollovers from IRAs, which can also function as a deduction for nonitemizers, is also discussed briefly.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Economic Analysis of the Charitable Contribution Deduction for Non-Itemizers

Economic Analysis of the Charitable Contribution Deduction for Non-Itemizers

Date: September 29, 2003
Creator: Gravelle, Jane G
Description: This report summarizes the provisions affecting charitable contribution deductions of individuals, and then analyzes the incentive such a deduction would create for increased charitable giving beginning with the original proposal for a relatively low cap and then considering other approaches including the current one. It does not attempt to estimate other types of societal impacts. The non-itemizer’s charitable deduction was the single most important tax provision in the original version of H.R. 7. In S. 1924, S. 476, and the current version of H.R. 7, the nonitemizer provision was temporary and had a higher cap (and a floor). The provision affecting rollovers from IRAs, which can also function as a deduction for nonitemizers, is also discussed briefly.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Economic Analysis of the Charitable Contribution Deduction for Non-Itemizers

Economic Analysis of the Charitable Contribution Deduction for Non-Itemizers

Date: September 20, 2002
Creator: Gravelle, Jane G
Description: This report summarizes the provisions affecting charitable contribution deductions of individuals, and then analyzes the incentive such a deduction would create for increased charitable giving beginning with the original proposal for a relatively low cap and then considering other approaches including the current one. It does not attempt to estimate other types of societal impacts. The non-itemizer’s charitable deduction was the single most important tax provision in the original version of H.R. 7. In S. 1924, S. 476, and the current version of H.R. 7, the nonitemizer provision was temporary and had a higher cap (and a floor). The provision affecting rollovers from IRAs, which can also function as a deduction for nonitemizers, is also discussed briefly.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Economic and Revenue Effects of Permanent and Temporary Capital Gains Tax Cuts

Economic and Revenue Effects of Permanent and Temporary Capital Gains Tax Cuts

Date: January 29, 2003
Creator: Gravelle, Jane G
Description: Recent proposals have been made to enact either a temporary or a permanent capital gains tax cut. The former would probably gain revenue in the first 2 years but lose that revenue and more, most likely within the following 3 years. H.R. 3090, passed by the House, would lower the top tax rate from 20% to 18% for assets held at least a year. The Senate Finance Committee version of H.R. 3090, does not reduce capital gains taxes. A capital gains tax cut appears the least likely of any permanent tax cut to stimulate the economy in the short run; a temporary capital gains tax cut is unlikely to provide any stimulus. Permanently lower capital gains taxes can contribute to economic efficiency in some ways and detract from it in others. Capital gains tax cuts would favor high income individuals, with about 80% of the benefit going to the top 2% of taxpayers.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Economic and Revenue Effects of Permanent and Temporary Capital Gains Tax Cuts

Economic and Revenue Effects of Permanent and Temporary Capital Gains Tax Cuts

Date: November 8, 2001
Creator: Gravelle, Jane G
Description: Recent proposals have been made to enact either a temporary or a permanent capital gains tax cut. The former would probably gain revenue in the first 2 years but lose that revenue and more, most likely within the following 3 years. H.R. 3090, passed by the House, would lower the top tax rate from 20% to 18% for assets held at least a year. The Senate Finance Committee version of H.R. 3090, does not reduce capital gains taxes. A capital gains tax cut appears the least likely of any permanent tax cut to stimulate the economy in the short run; a temporary capital gains tax cut is unlikely to provide any stimulus. Permanently lower capital gains taxes can contribute to economic efficiency in some ways and detract from it in others. Capital gains tax cuts would favor high income individuals, with about 80% of the benefit going to the top 2% of taxpayers.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Economic Issues Surrounding the Estate and Gift Tax: A Brief Summary

Economic Issues Surrounding the Estate and Gift Tax: A Brief Summary

Date: January 29, 2003
Creator: Gravelle, Jane G
Description: Supporters of the estate and gift tax argue that it provides progressivity in the federal tax system, provides a backstop to the individual income tax and appropriately targets assets that are bestowed on heirs rather than assets earned through their hard work and effort. However, progressivity can be obtained through the income tax and the estate and gift tax is an imperfect backstop to the income tax. Critics argue that the tax discourages savings, harms small businesses and farms, taxes resources already subject to income taxes, and adds to the complexity of the tax system.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Economic Issues Surrounding the Estate and Gift Tax: A Brief Summary

Economic Issues Surrounding the Estate and Gift Tax: A Brief Summary

Date: June 19, 2001
Creator: Gravelle, Jane G
Description: Supporters of the estate and gift tax argue that it provides progressivity in the federal tax system, provides a backstop to the individual income tax and appropriately targets assets that are bestowed on heirs rather than assets earned through their hard work and effort. However, progressivity can be obtained through the income tax and the estate and gift tax is an imperfect backstop to the income tax. Critics argue that the tax discourages savings, harms small businesses and farms, taxes resources already subject to income taxes, and adds to the complexity of the tax system.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department