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 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
State Corporate Income Taxes: A Description and Analysis

State Corporate Income Taxes: A Description and Analysis

Date: June 30, 2006
Creator: Maguire, Steven
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Internet Commerce and State Sales and Use Taxes

Internet Commerce and State Sales and Use Taxes

Date: January 18, 2002
Creator: Maguire, Steven
Description: State governments rely on sales and use taxes for approximately one-third (32.3%) of their total tax revenue – or approximately $174 billion in FY2000. Local governments derived 16.4% of their tax revenue or $51.6 billion from local sales and use taxes in FY1999. Both state and local sales taxes are collected by vendors at the time of transaction and are levied at a percentage of a product’s retail price. Alternatively, use taxes are not collected by vendors if they do not have nexus (loosely defined as a physical presence) in the consumer’s state. Consumers are required to remit use taxes to their taxing jurisdiction. However, compliance with this requirement is quite low. Because of the low compliance, many observers suggest that the expansion of the internet as a means of transacting business across state lines, both from business to consumer (B to C) and from business to business (B to B), threatens to diminish the ability of state and local governments to collect sales and use taxes. Congress has a role in this issue because commerce between parties in different states conducted over the Internet falls under the Commerce Clause of the Constitution. Congress can either take an active or ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Internet Commerce and State Sales and Use Taxes

Internet Commerce and State Sales and Use Taxes

Date: January 18, 2002
Creator: Maguire, Steven
Description: State governments rely on sales and use taxes for approximately one-third (32.3%) of their total tax revenue – or approximately $174 billion in FY2000. Local governments derived 16.4% of their tax revenue or $51.6 billion from local sales and use taxes in FY1999. Both state and local sales taxes are collected by vendors at the time of transaction and are levied at a percentage of a product’s retail price. Alternatively, use taxes are not collected by vendors if they do not have nexus (loosely defined as a physical presence) in the consumer’s state. Consumers are required to remit use taxes to their taxing jurisdiction. However, compliance with this requirement is quite low. Because of the low compliance, many observers suggest that the expansion of the internet as a means of transacting business across state lines, both from business to consumer (B to C) and from business to business (B to B), threatens to diminish the ability of state and local governments to collect sales and use taxes. Congress has a role in this issue because commerce between parties in different states conducted over the Internet falls under the Commerce Clause of the Constitution. Congress can either take an active or ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Internet Commerce and State Sales and Use Taxes

Internet Commerce and State Sales and Use Taxes

Date: March 31, 2004
Creator: Maguire, Steven
Description: State governments rely on sales and use taxes for approximately one-third (33.6%) of their total tax revenue - or approximately $179 billion in FY2002 .' Local governments derived 12.4% of their tax revenue or $44 .1 billion from local sales and use taxes in FY20012 Both state and local sales taxes are collected by vendors at the time of transaction and are levied at a percentage of a product's retail price. Alternatively, use taxes are not collected by the vendor if the vendor does not have nexus (loosely defined as a physical presence) in the consumer's state . Consumers are required to remit use taxes to their taxing jurisdiction . However, compliance with this requirement is quite low. Because of the low compliance, many observers suggest that the expansion of the internet as a means of transacting business across state lines, both from business to consumer (B to C) and from business to business (B to B), threatens to diminish the ability of state and local governments to collect sales and use taxes . Congress has a role in this issue because commerce between parties in different states conducted over the Internet falls under the Commerce Clause of the Constitution.' ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The American Opportunity Tax Credit: Overview, Analysis, and Policy Options

The American Opportunity Tax Credit: Overview, Analysis, and Policy Options

Date: July 10, 2014
Creator: Crandall-Hollick, Margot L.
Description: This report provides both an in-depth description of the American Opportunity Tax Credit, an analysis of its economic impact, and an overview of various policy options.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Estate and Gift Taxes for Nonresident Aliens

Estate and Gift Taxes for Nonresident Aliens

Date: June 2, 2014
Creator: Lanza, Emily M.
Description: This report explains the major provisions of the federal estate and gift transfer taxes for transfers by nonresident aliens in 2014. This discussion highlights the different tax rules for estates of nonresident aliens as compared to the estates of U.S. citizens and resident aliens.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
An Analysis of the Geographic Distribution of the Mortgage Interest Deduction

An Analysis of the Geographic Distribution of the Mortgage Interest Deduction

Date: January 30, 2014
Creator: Keightley, Mark P.
Description: This report analyzes variation in the mortgage interest deduction tax expenditure across states. Tax expenditures, such as the mortgage interest deduction, can generally be viewed as government spending administered via the tax code, or as tax incentives that are intended to achieve particular policy objectives. Regardless of the interpretation, tax expenditures provide a benefit to qualifying taxpayers by lowering their federal tax liabilities.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Bush Tax Cuts and the Economy

The Bush Tax Cuts and the Economy

Date: December 10, 2010
Creator: Hungerford, Thomas L.
Description: The George W. Bush Administration enacted a series of tax cuts through the Economic Growth and Tax Relief Reconciliation Act of 2001 and the Jobs and Growth Tax Relief Reconciliation Act of 2003. This report examines these tax cuts within the context of the current and long-term economic environment.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Tax Deductible Expenses: The BP Case

Tax Deductible Expenses: The BP Case

Date: August 11, 2010
Creator: Sherlock, Molly F.
Description: Following the release of BP's second quarter earning statement, which showed a $10 billion reduction in tax liability for oil-spill-related cleanup and expenses, media headlines have generated public concern, and in some cases outrage, over these tax savings. Further, the ability of BP to realize these tax savings has generated a number of inquiries as to how and why BP is entitled to this reduction in tax liability. This report discusses the nature of BP's $10 billion "credit" and the nature of corporate tax deductions.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Early Withdrawals and Required Minimum Distributions in Retirement Accounts: Issues for Congress

Early Withdrawals and Required Minimum Distributions in Retirement Accounts: Issues for Congress

Date: January 7, 2011
Creator: Topoleski, John J.
Description: In response to the economic downturn, Congress considered providing relief to Americans by suspending two tax penalties on defined contribution retirement plans and Individual Retirement Accounts (IRAs). This report discusses the reasons offered in support of suspending these provisions, as well as the drawbacks. This report also presents data that estimates the number of households that these proposals would impact. Borrowing from retirement plans as an alternative to withdrawals is also discussed. Finally, the report discusses the kinds of proposals offered to either suspend or eliminate the early withdrawal penalty or the required minimum distribution provision.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department