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 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
A Value-Added Tax Contrasted with a National Sales Tax

A Value-Added Tax Contrasted with a National Sales Tax

Date: September 15, 2003
Creator: Bickley, James M
Description: Proposals to replace all or part of the income tax, proposals for national health care, and a proposal to finance America’s war effort have sparked congressional interest in the possibility of a broad-based consumption tax as a new source of revenue. A value-added tax (VAT) or a national sales tax (NST) have been frequently discussed as possible new tax sources. Both the VAT and the NST are taxes on the consumption of goods and services and are conceptually similar. Yet, these taxes also have significant differences. This issue brief discusses some of the potential policy implications associated with these differences.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
A Value-Added Tax Contrasted with a National Sales Tax

A Value-Added Tax Contrasted with a National Sales Tax

Date: August 4, 2003
Creator: Bickley, James M
Description: Proposals to replace all or part of the income tax, proposals for national health care, and a proposal to finance America’s war effort have sparked congressional interest in the possibility of a broad-based consumption tax as a new source of revenue. A value-added tax (VAT) or a national sales tax (NST) have been frequently discussed as possible new tax sources. Both the VAT and the NST are taxes on the consumption of goods and services and are conceptually similar. Yet, these taxes also have significant differences. This issue brief discusses some of the potential policy implications associated with these differences.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
A Value-Added Tax Contrasted with a National Sales Tax

A Value-Added Tax Contrasted with a National Sales Tax

Date: July 10, 2003
Creator: Bickley, James M
Description: Proposals to replace all or part of the income tax, proposals for national health care, and a proposal to finance America’s war effort have sparked congressional interest in the possibility of a broad-based consumption tax as a new source of revenue. A value-added tax (VAT) or a national sales tax (NST) have been frequently discussed as possible new tax sources. Both the VAT and the NST are taxes on the consumption of goods and services and are conceptually similar. Yet, these taxes also have significant differences. This issue brief discusses some of the potential policy implications associated with these differences.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
A Value-Added Tax Contrasted with a National Sales Tax

A Value-Added Tax Contrasted with a National Sales Tax

Date: June 11, 2003
Creator: Bickley, James M
Description: Proposals to replace all or part of the income tax, proposals for national health care, and a proposal to finance America’s war effort have sparked congressional interest in the possibility of a broad-based consumption tax as a newsource of revenue. A value-added tax (VAT) or a national sales tax (NST) have been frequently discussed as possible new tax sources. Both the VAT and the NST are taxes on the consumption of goods and services and are conceptually similar. Yet, these taxes also have significant differences. This issue brief discusses some of the potential policy implications associated with these differences.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
A Value-Added Tax Contrasted with a National Sales Tax

A Value-Added Tax Contrasted with a National Sales Tax

Date: May 1, 2003
Creator: Bickley, James M
Description: Proposals to replace all or part of the income tax, proposals for national health care, and a proposal to finance America’s war effort have sparked congressional interest in the possibility of a broad-based consumption tax as a new source of revenue. A value-added tax (VAT) or a national sales tax (NST) have been frequently discussed as possible new tax sources. Both the VAT and the NST are taxes on the consumption of goods and services and are conceptually similar. Yet, these taxes also have significant differences. This issue brief discusses some of the potential policy implications associated with these differences.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
A Value-Added Tax Contrasted with a National Sales Tax

A Value-Added Tax Contrasted with a National Sales Tax

Date: March 19, 2003
Creator: Bickley, James M
Description: Proposals to replace all or part of the income tax, proposals for national health care, and a proposal to finance America’s war effort have sparked congressional interest in the possibility of a broad-based consumption tax as a new source of revenue. A value-added tax (VAT) or a national sales tax (NST) have been frequently discussed as possible new tax sources. Both the VAT and the NST are taxes on the consumption of goods and services and are conceptually similar. Yet, these taxes also have significant differences. This issue brief discusses some of the potential policy implications associated with these differences.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
A Value-Added Tax Contrasted with a National Sales Tax

A Value-Added Tax Contrasted with a National Sales Tax

Date: January 29, 2003
Creator: Bickley, James M
Description: Proposals to replace all or part of the income tax, proposals for national health care, and a proposal to finance America’s war effort have sparked congressional interest in the possibility of a broad-based consumption tax as a new source of revenue. A value-added tax (VAT) or a national sales tax (NST) have been frequently discussed as possible new tax sources. Both the VAT and the NST are taxes on the consumption of goods and services and are conceptually similar. Yet, these taxes also have significant differences. This issue brief discusses some of the potential policy implications associated with these differences.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
A Value-Added Tax Contrasted with a National Sales Tax

A Value-Added Tax Contrasted with a National Sales Tax

Date: December 12, 2002
Creator: Bickley, James M
Description: Proposals to replace all or part of the income tax and proposals for national health care have sparked congressional interest in possible sources of additional revenue. A value-added tax (VAT) or a national sales tax (NST) have been frequently discussed as possible new tax sources. Both the VAT and the NST are taxes on the consumption of goods and services and are conceptually similar. Yet, these taxes also have significant differences. This issue brief discusses some of the potential policy implications associated with these differences.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
A Value-Added Tax Contrasted with a National Sales Tax

A Value-Added Tax Contrasted with a National Sales Tax

Date: November 14, 2002
Creator: Bickley, James M
Description: Proposals to replace all or part of the income tax and proposals for national health care have sparked congressional interest in possible sources of additional revenue. A value-added tax (VAT) or a national sales tax (NST) have been frequently discussed as possible new tax sources. Both the VAT and the NST are taxes on the consumption of goods and services and are conceptually similar. Yet, these taxes also have significant differences. This issue brief discusses some of the potential policy implications associated with these differences.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
A Value-Added Tax Contrasted with a National Sales Tax

A Value-Added Tax Contrasted with a National Sales Tax

Date: August 30, 2002
Creator: Bickley, James M
Description: Proposals to replace all or part of the income tax and proposals for national health care have sparked congressional interest in possible sources of additional revenue. A value-added tax (VAT) or a national sales tax (NST) have been frequently discussed as possible new tax sources. Both the VAT and the NST are taxes on the consumption of goods and services and are conceptually similar. Yet, these taxes also have significant differences. This issue brief discusses some of the potential policy implications associated with these differences.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department