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 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
Federal Farm Promotion ("Check-off") Programs
The U.S. Supreme Court in 2005 affirmed the constitutionality of the so-called beef check-off program, one of the 18 generic promotion programs for agricultural products that are now active nationally. Supporters view check-offs as economically beneficial self-help activities that need minimal government involvement or taxpayer funding. Producers, handlers, and/or importers are required to pay an assessment, usually deducted from revenue at time of sale - thus the name check-off. However, some farmers contend they are being "taxed" for advertising and related activities they would not underwrite voluntarily. The Supreme Court's decision to uphold the beef check-off is considered significant for the future of the other programs, although the Court left open the possibility of additional challenges. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc26082/
How Unanimous Consent Agreements Regulate Senate Floor Action
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5454/
Flat Tax Proposals and Fundamental Tax Reform: An Overview
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6532/
Flat Tax Proposals and Fundamental Tax Reform: An Overview
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6311/
Flat Tax Proposals and Fundamental Tax Reform: An Overview
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6045/
Flat Tax Proposals and Fundamental Tax Reform: An Overview
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5426/
Flat Tax Proposals and Fundamental Tax Reform: An Overview
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5425/
Flat Tax Proposals and Fundamental Tax Reform: An Overview
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3438/
Flat Tax Proposals and Fundamental Tax Reform: An Overview
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3437/
Flat Tax Proposals and Fundamental Tax Reform: An Overview
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3436/
Flat Tax Proposals and Fundamental Tax Reform: An Overview
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1949/
Flat Tax Proposals and Fundamental Tax Reform: An Overview
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5433/
Flat Tax Proposals and Fundamental Tax Reform: An Overview
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5432/
Flat Tax Proposals and Fundamental Tax Reform: An Overview
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5431/
Flat Tax Proposals and Fundamental Tax Reform: An Overview
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5430/
Flat Tax Proposals and Fundamental Tax Reform: An Overview
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5429/
Flat Tax Proposals and Fundamental Tax Reform: An Overview
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5428/
Flat Tax Proposals and Fundamental Tax Reform: An Overview
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5427/
Flat Tax Proposals and Fundamental Tax Reform: An Overview
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1310/
Should Credit Unions Be Taxed?
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7752/
Tax Code Termination Act: A Fact Sheet
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs796/
Value-Added Tax: A New U.S. Revenue Source?
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs9516/
Value-Added Tax as a New Revenue Source
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6643/
Value-Added Tax as a New Revenue Source
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1308/
Value-Added Tax as a New Revenue Source
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5411/
Value-Added Tax as a New Revenue Source
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5410/
Value-Added Tax as a New Revenue Source
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5409/
Value-Added Tax as a New Revenue Source
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3431/
Value-Added Tax as a New Revenue Source
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3430/
Value-Added Tax as a New Revenue Source
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3429/
Value-Added Tax as a New Revenue Source
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3428/
Value-Added Tax as a New Revenue Source
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5416/
Value-Added Tax as a New Revenue Source
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5415/
Value-Added Tax as a New Revenue Source
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5414/
Value-Added Tax as a New Revenue Source
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5413/
Value-Added Tax as a New Revenue Source
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5412/
A Value-Added Tax Contrasted with a National Sales Tax
Proposals to replace all or part of the income tax, proposals for national health care, and a proposal to finance America’s war effort have sparked congressional interest in the possibility of a broad-based consumption tax as a new source of revenue. A value-added tax (VAT) or a national sales tax (NST) have been frequently discussed as possible new tax sources. Both the VAT and the NST are taxes on the consumption of goods and services and are conceptually similar. Yet, these taxes also have significant differences. This issue brief discusses some of the potential policy implications associated with these differences. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6044/
A Value-Added Tax Contrasted with a National Sales Tax
Proposals to replace all or part of the income tax, proposals for national health care, and a proposal to finance America’s war effort have sparked congressional interest in the possibility of a broad-based consumption tax as a new source of revenue. Avalue-added tax (VAT) or a national sales tax (NST) have been frequently discussed as possible new tax sources. Both the VAT and the NST are taxes on the consumption of goods and services and are conceptually similar. Yet, these taxes also have significant differences. This issue brief discusses some of the potential policy implications associated with these differences. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5424/
A Value-Added Tax Contrasted with a National Sales Tax
Proposals to replace all or part of the income tax, proposals for national health care, and a proposal to finance America’s war effort have sparked congressional interest in the possibility of a broad-based consumption tax as a new source of revenue. A value-added tax (VAT) or a national sales tax (NST) have been frequently discussed as possible new tax sources. Both the VAT and the NST are taxes on the consumption of goods and services and are conceptually similar. Yet, these taxes also have significant differences. This issue brief discusses some of the potential policy implications associated with these differences. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5423/
A Value-Added Tax Contrasted with a National Sales Tax
Proposals to replace all or part of the income tax, proposals for national health care, and a proposal to finance America’s war effort have sparked congressional interest in the possibility of a broad-based consumption tax as a new source of revenue. A value-added tax (VAT) or a national sales tax (NST) have been frequently discussed as possible new tax sources. Both the VAT and the NST are taxes on the consumption of goods and services and are conceptually similar. Yet, these taxes also have significant differences. This issue brief discusses some of the potential policy implications associated with these differences. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5422/
A Value-Added Tax Contrasted with a National Sales Tax
Proposals to replace all or part of the income tax, proposals for national health care, and a proposal to finance America’s war effort have sparked congressional interest in the possibility of a broad-based consumption tax as a new source of revenue. A value-added tax (VAT) or a national sales tax (NST) have been frequently discussed as possible new tax sources. Both the VAT and the NST are taxes on the consumption of goods and services and are conceptually similar. Yet, these taxes also have significant differences. This issue brief discusses some of the potential policy implications associated with these differences. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5421/
A Value-Added Tax Contrasted with a National Sales Tax
Proposals to replace all or part of the income tax, proposals for national health care, and a proposal to finance America’s war effort have sparked congressional interest in the possibility of a broad-based consumption tax as a newsource of revenue. A value-added tax (VAT) or a national sales tax (NST) have been frequently discussed as possible new tax sources. Both the VAT and the NST are taxes on the consumption of goods and services and are conceptually similar. Yet, these taxes also have significant differences. This issue brief discusses some of the potential policy implications associated with these differences. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5420/
A Value-Added Tax Contrasted with a National Sales Tax
Proposals to replace all or part of the income tax, proposals for national health care, and a proposal to finance America’s war effort have sparked congressional interest in the possibility of a broad-based consumption tax as a new source of revenue. A value-added tax (VAT) or a national sales tax (NST) have been frequently discussed as possible new tax sources. Both the VAT and the NST are taxes on the consumption of goods and services and are conceptually similar. Yet, these taxes also have significant differences. This issue brief discusses some of the potential policy implications associated with these differences. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5419/
A Value-Added Tax Contrasted with a National Sales Tax
Proposals to replace all or part of the income tax, proposals for national health care, and a proposal to finance America’s war effort have sparked congressional interest in the possibility of a broad-based consumption tax as a new source of revenue. A value-added tax (VAT) or a national sales tax (NST) have been frequently discussed as possible new tax sources. Both the VAT and the NST are taxes on the consumption of goods and services and are conceptually similar. Yet, these taxes also have significant differences. This issue brief discusses some of the potential policy implications associated with these differences. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5418/
A Value-Added Tax Contrasted with a National Sales Tax
Proposals to replace all or part of the income tax, proposals for national health care, and a proposal to finance America’s war effort have sparked congressional interest in the possibility of a broad-based consumption tax as a new source of revenue. A value-added tax (VAT) or a national sales tax (NST) have been frequently discussed as possible new tax sources. Both the VAT and the NST are taxes on the consumption of goods and services and are conceptually similar. Yet, these taxes also have significant differences. This issue brief discusses some of the potential policy implications associated with these differences. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5417/
A Value-Added Tax Contrasted with a National Sales Tax
Proposals to replace all or part of the income tax and proposals for national health care have sparked congressional interest in possible sources of additional revenue. A value-added tax (VAT) or a national sales tax (NST) have been frequently discussed as possible new tax sources. Both the VAT and the NST are taxes on the consumption of goods and services and are conceptually similar. Yet, these taxes also have significant differences. This issue brief discusses some of the potential policy implications associated with these differences. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3435/
A Value-Added Tax Contrasted with a National Sales Tax
Proposals to replace all or part of the income tax and proposals for national health care have sparked congressional interest in possible sources of additional revenue. A value-added tax (VAT) or a national sales tax (NST) have been frequently discussed as possible new tax sources. Both the VAT and the NST are taxes on the consumption of goods and services and are conceptually similar. Yet, these taxes also have significant differences. This issue brief discusses some of the potential policy implications associated with these differences. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3434/
A Value-Added Tax Contrasted with a National Sales Tax
Proposals to replace all or part of the income tax and proposals for national health care have sparked congressional interest in possible sources of additional revenue. A value-added tax (VAT) or a national sales tax (NST) have been frequently discussed as possible new tax sources. Both the VAT and the NST are taxes on the consumption of goods and services and are conceptually similar. Yet, these taxes also have significant differences. This issue brief discusses some of the potential policy implications associated with these differences. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3433/
A Value-Added Tax Contrasted with a National Sales Tax
Proposals to replace all or part of the income tax and proposals for national health care have sparked congressional interest in possible sources of additional revenue. A value-added tax (VAT) or a national sales tax (NST) have been frequently discussed as possible new tax sources. Both the VAT and the NST are taxes on the consumption of goods and services and are conceptually similar. Yet, these taxes also have significant differences. This issue brief discusses some of the potential policy implications associated with these differences. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3432/
A Value-Added Tax Contrasted with a National Sales Tax
Proposals to replace all or part of the income tax and proposals for national health care have sparked congressional interest in possible sources of additional revenue. A value-added tax (VAT) or a national sales tax (NST) have been frequently discussed as possible new tax services. Both the VAT and the NST are taxes on the consumption of goods and services and are conceptually similar. Yet, these taxes also have significant differences. This issue brief discusses some of the potential policy implications associated with these differences. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1309/
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