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 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
Preemption Language in Federal Environmental Statutes

Preemption Language in Federal Environmental Statutes

Date: July 29, 1999
Creator: Meltz, Robert
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Electric Utility Restructuring: Overview of Basic Policy Questions

Electric Utility Restructuring: Overview of Basic Policy Questions

Date: January 28, 1997
Creator: Parker, Larry
Description: Proposals to increase competition in the electric utility industry involve segmenting electric functions (generation, transmission, distribution) that are currently integrated (or bundled) in most cases (both in terms of corporate and rate structures). This report identifies five basic issues this effort raises for the Congress to consider as the debate on restructuring proceeds.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
New Welfare Law: Comparison of the New Block Grant Program with Aid to Families with Dependent Children

New Welfare Law: Comparison of the New Block Grant Program with Aid to Families with Dependent Children

Date: October 6, 1997
Creator: Burke, Vee
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Crime Control: The Federal Response

Crime Control: The Federal Response

Date: January 25, 2003
Creator: O'Bryant, JoAnne
Description: Under the federal system in the United States, the states and localities traditionally have held the major responsibility for prevention and control of crime and maintenance of order. For most of the Republic’s history, “police powers” in the broad sense were reserved to the states under the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution. Many still hold that view, but others see a string of court decisions in recent decades as providing the basis for a far more active federal role. Several bills are discussed in this report that address issues related to crime, juvenile justice, and Congress’ evolving role in crime legislation.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Crime Control: The Federal Response

Crime Control: The Federal Response

Date: May 8, 2003
Creator: O'Bryant, JoAnne
Description: Under the federal system in the United States, the states and localities traditionally have held the major responsibility for prevention and control of crime and maintenance of order. For most of the Republic’s history, “police powers” in the broad sense were reserved to the states under the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution. Many still hold that view, but others see a string of court decisions in recent decades as providing the basis for a far more active federal role. Several bills are discussed in this report that address issues related to crime, juvenile justice, and Congress’ evolving role in crime legislation.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Crime Control: The Federal Response

Crime Control: The Federal Response

Date: July 7, 2003
Creator: O'Bryant, JoAnne
Description: Under the federal system in the United States, the states and localities traditionally have held the major responsibility for prevention and control of crime and maintenance of order. For most of the Republic’s history, “police powers” in the broad sense were reserved to the states under the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution. Many still hold that view, but others see a string of court decisions in recent decades as providing the basis for a far more active federal role. Several bills are discussed in this report that address issues related to crime, juvenile justice, and Congress’ evolving role in crime legislation.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Crime Control: The Federal Response

Crime Control: The Federal Response

Date: September 23, 2003
Creator: O'Bryant, JoAnne
Description: Under the federal system in the United States, the states and localities traditionally have held the major responsibility for prevention and control of crime and maintenance of order. For most of the Republic’s history, “police powers” in the broad sense were reserved to the states under the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution. Many still hold that view, but others see a string of court decisions in recent decades as providing the basis for a far more active federal role. Several bills are discussed in this report that address issues related to crime, juvenile justice, and Congress’ evolving role in crime legislation.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Crime Control: The Federal Response

Crime Control: The Federal Response

Date: March 5, 2003
Creator: O'Bryant, JoAnne
Description: Under the federal system in the United States, the states and localities traditionally have held the major responsibility for prevention and control of crime and maintenance of order. For most of the Republic’s history, “police powers” in the broad sense were reserved to the states under the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution. Many still hold that view, but others see a string of court decisions in recent decades as providing the basis for a far more active federal role. Several bills are discussed in this report that address issues related to crime, juvenile justice, and Congress’ evolving role in crime legislation.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The New Welfare Law: Temporary Assistance for Needy Families

The New Welfare Law: Temporary Assistance for Needy Families

Date: September 2, 1997
Creator: Burke, Vee
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
American Federalism, 1776 to 1997: Significant Events

American Federalism, 1776 to 1997: Significant Events

Date: January 6, 1997
Creator: Boyd, Eugene
Description: This report identifies several significant eras and events in the evolution of American federalism and provides a capsule description or discussion of each. It should be noted that among experts in the field of federalism there may be a general consensus concerning the evolution of American federalism; however, the choice of events and scholarly interpretations of such events may vary and are by nature subjective.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department