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 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
Forest Service Receipt-Sharing Payments: Proposals for Change
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Year 2000 Computer Problem: State Government Issues
The federal government sends and receives data from the states in support of many social service programs. Examples of such programs are: Medicare, Medicaid, Welfare, Food Stamps, and Unemployment Insurance. The federal government will not be able to deliver critical social services if data exchanges with state governments are not Y2K- compliant, yet there is no complete picture of their readiness. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1030/
FY2009 Appropriations for State and Local Homeland Security
Congress appropriated, in P.L. 110-329, approximately $4.36 billion for state and local homeland security assistance programs. This is approximately $135 million more than was appropriated in FY2008 ($4.22 billion). Congress chose not to fund the Real ID program in FY2009, however, it did appropriate funding ($2 million) for a new assistance program titled the Center for Counterterrorism and Cyber Crime at Norwich University in Northfield, Vermont. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs10725/
FY2009 Appropriations for State and Local Homeland Security
Congress appropriated, in P.L. 110-329, approximately $4.36 billion for state and local homeland security assistance programs. This is approximately $135 million more than was appropriated in FY2008 ($4.22 billion). Congress chose not to fund the Real ID program in FY2009, however, it did appropriate funding ($2 million) for a new assistance program titled the Center for Counterterrorism and Cyber Crime at Norwich University in Northfield, Vermont. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs10726/
TANF Sanctions - Brief Summary
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Federalism and the Constitution: Limits on Congressional Power
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Crime Control: The Federal Response
Under the federal system in the United States, the states and localities traditionally have held the major responsibility for prevention and control of crime and maintenance of order. For most of the Republic’s history, “police powers” in the broad sense were reserved to the states under the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution. Many still hold that view, but others see a string of court decisions in recent decades as providing the basis for a far more active federal role. Several bills are discussed in this report that address issues related to crime, juvenile justice, and school violence. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1529/
The State Children's Health Insurance Program: Eligibility, Enrollment, and Program Funding
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Speed Limits for Motor Vehicles
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs8884/
Electric Utility Restructuring: Overview of Basic Policy Questions
Proposals to increase competition in the electric utility industry involve segmenting electric functions (generation, transmission, distribution) that are currently integrated (or bundled) in most cases (both in terms of corporate and rate structures). This report identifies five basic issues this effort raises for the Congress to consider as the debate on restructuring proceeds. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs958/
Welfare Reform: TANF Trends and Data
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5708/
Social Services Block Grant (Title XX of the Social Security Act)
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Federalism, State Sovereignty and the Constitution: Basis and Limits of Congressional Power
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Social Services Block Grant (Title XX of the Social Security Act)
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5384/
Federalism, State Sovereignty and the Constitution: Basis and Limits of Congressional Power
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Social Services Block Grant (Title XX of the Social Security Act)
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5383/
State Election Laws: Overview of Statutes Regarding Emergency Election Postponement Within the State
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Right to a Clean Environment Provisions in State Constitutions, and Arguments as to a Federal Counterpart
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1023/
Crime Control: The Federal Response
Under the federal system in the United States, the states and localities traditionally have held the major responsibility for prevention and control of crime and maintenance of order. For most of the Republic’s history, “police powers” in the broad sense were reserved to the states under the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution. Many still hold that view, but others see a string of court decisions in recent decades as providing the basis for a far more active federal role. Several bills are discussed in this report that address issues related to crime, juvenile justice, and Congress’ evolving role in crime legislation. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2350/
Unfunded Mandate Reform Act: A Brief Summary
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National Minimum Drinking Age: Provisions and Analysis
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The State Children's Health Insurance Program: Eligibility, Enrollment, and Program Funding
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Journalists' Privilege to Withhold Information in Judicial and Other Proceedings: State Shield Statutes
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6147/
Crime Control: The Federal Response
Under the federal system in the United States, the states and localities traditionally have held the major responsibility for prevention and control of crime and maintenance of order. For most of the Republic’s history, “police powers” in the broad sense were reserved to the states under the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution. Many still hold that view, but others see a string of court decisions in recent decades as providing the basis for a far more active federal role. Several bills are discussed in this report that address issues related to crime, juvenile justice, and school violence. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2348/
Crime Control: The Federal Response
Under the federal system in the United States, the states and localities traditionally have held the major responsibility for prevention and control of crime and maintenance of order. For most of the Republic’s history, “police powers” in the broad sense were reserved to the states under the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution. Many still hold that view, but others see a string of court decisions in recent decades as providing the basis for a far more active federal role. Several bills are discussed in this report that address issues related to crime, juvenile justice, and Congress’ evolving role in crime legislation. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2349/
State Sales Taxation of Internet Transactions
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1979/
Preemption Language in Federal Environmental Statutes
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs970/
Electric Utility Restructuring: Overview of Basic Policy Questions
Proposals to increase competition in the electric utility industry involve segmenting electric functions (generation, transmission, distribution) that are currently integrated (or bundled) in most cases (both in terms of corporate and rate structures). This report identifies five basic issues this effort raises for the Congress to consider as the debate on restructuring proceeds. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs426/
New Welfare Law: Comparison of the New Block Grant Program with Aid to Families with Dependent Children
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs491/
Crime Control: The Federal Response
Under the federal system in the United States, the states and localities traditionally have held the major responsibility for prevention and control of crime and maintenance of order. For most of the Republic’s history, “police powers” in the broad sense were reserved to the states under the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution. Many still hold that view, but others see a string of court decisions in recent decades as providing the basis for a far more active federal role. Several bills are discussed in this report that address issues related to crime, juvenile justice, and Congress’ evolving role in crime legislation. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4085/
Crime Control: The Federal Response
Under the federal system in the United States, the states and localities traditionally have held the major responsibility for prevention and control of crime and maintenance of order. For most of the Republic’s history, “police powers” in the broad sense were reserved to the states under the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution. Many still hold that view, but others see a string of court decisions in recent decades as providing the basis for a far more active federal role. Several bills are discussed in this report that address issues related to crime, juvenile justice, and Congress’ evolving role in crime legislation. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4087/
Crime Control: The Federal Response
Under the federal system in the United States, the states and localities traditionally have held the major responsibility for prevention and control of crime and maintenance of order. For most of the Republic’s history, “police powers” in the broad sense were reserved to the states under the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution. Many still hold that view, but others see a string of court decisions in recent decades as providing the basis for a far more active federal role. Several bills are discussed in this report that address issues related to crime, juvenile justice, and Congress’ evolving role in crime legislation. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4088/
Crime Control: The Federal Response
Under the federal system in the United States, the states and localities traditionally have held the major responsibility for prevention and control of crime and maintenance of order. For most of the Republic’s history, “police powers” in the broad sense were reserved to the states under the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution. Many still hold that view, but others see a string of court decisions in recent decades as providing the basis for a far more active federal role. Several bills are discussed in this report that address issues related to crime, juvenile justice, and Congress’ evolving role in crime legislation. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4089/
Crime Control: The Federal Response
Under the federal system in the United States, the states and localities traditionally have held the major responsibility for prevention and control of crime and maintenance of order. For most of the Republic’s history, “police powers” in the broad sense were reserved to the states under the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution. Many still hold that view, but others see a string of court decisions in recent decades as providing the basis for a far more active federal role. Several bills are discussed in this report that address issues related to crime, juvenile justice, and Congress’ evolving role in crime legislation. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4086/
The New Welfare Law: Temporary Assistance for Needy Families
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs492/
American Federalism, 1776 to 1997: Significant Events
This report identifies several significant eras and events in the evolution of American federalism and provides a capsule description or discussion of each. It should be noted that among experts in the field of federalism there may be a general consensus concerning the evolution of American federalism; however, the choice of events and scholarly interpretations of such events may vary and are by nature subjective. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs490/
Welfare Reform: TANF Trends and Data
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3677/
Welfare Reform: TANF Trends and Data
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3676/
Arizona v. United States: A Limited Role for States in Immigration Enforcement
Report that discusses the Supreme Court's ruling in Arizona v. United States, and considers the implications that the decision may have for immigration enforcement activity by states and localities. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc227808/
Social Services Block Grant (Title XX of the Social Security Act)
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3415/
Social Services Block Grant (Title XX of the Social Security Act)
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3414/
Social Services Block Grant (Title XX of the Social Security Act)
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3416/
Child Welfare Financing: An Issue Overview
The purpose of this report is to describe the federal interest in child welfare (as expressed by Congress); describe the current level and structure of federal dedicated child welfare financing and examine trends in the appropriation and spending of this money; and to review the extent to which states rely on non-dedicated federal funds for child welfare purposes. Finally, the report discusses the future federal commitment to child welfare financing, along with the concepts of flexibility and accountability, as these relate both to current law and to recent proposals to alter federal child welfare financing. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7687/
Child Welfare: State Performance on Child and Family Services Reviews
This report begins with a short history of the legislation and other factors that led to the creation of the current CFSR and then briefly describes how a CFSR is conducted and what “substantial conformity” with federal child welfare policy means in the context of this review. Much has been made of the fact that no state was found to be in substantial conformity with all aspects of federal policy reviewed during the initial (FY2001-FY2004) round of the CFSRs. This report seeks to better understand that fact by looking closely at state performance on each of the performance indicators that determined compliance. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7688/
What Do Local Elections Officials Think About Election Reform?: Results of a Survey
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Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP): Formula and Estimated Allocation Rates
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7322/
Equal Rights Amendments: State Provisions
Twenty states adopted state equal rights amendments between 1879 and 1998. The texts of most of these amendments either are similar to the proposed federal amendment or restate the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. The timing of the enactment of these state amendments and the choice of wording reflect both the ebb and flow of the women's movement in the United States and the political culture of the particular states at the time of passage. A brief history of the women's rights movement as it relates to the passage of state equal rights amendments is included. The report ends with the text and the date of enactment of each amendment. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7397/
Homeland Security Grant Formulas: A Comparison of Formula Provisions in S. 21 and H.R. 1544, 109th Congress
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7657/
Homeland Security Grant Formulas: A Comparison of Formula Provisions in S. 21 and H.R. 1544, 109th Congress
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7658/
Community Services Block Grants (CSBG): Funding and Reauthorization
Community Services Block Grants (CSBG), administered by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), provide federal funds to states, territories and Indian tribes for distribution to local agencies to reduce poverty. Several related national activities — Community Economic Development, Rural Community Facilities, National Youth Sports, Community Food and Nutrition, Job Opportunities for Low-Income Individuals (JOLI) and Individual Development Accounts (IDAs) — also provide grants to local communities for a variety of anti-poverty initiatives. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7443/