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 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
Comparison of California's Financial Information Privacy Act of 2003 with Federal Privacy Provisions

Comparison of California's Financial Information Privacy Act of 2003 with Federal Privacy Provisions

Date: January 6, 2004
Creator: Murphy, M. Maureen
Description: The California Financial Information Privacy Act,1 enacted on August 28, 2003, and effective on July 1, 2004, governs the rights of California residents with respect to the dissemination of nonpublic personal information by financial institutions. In some respects, it diverges from two federal laws that impose restrictions on the dissemination of nonpublic personally identifiable customer information by financial information.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Connecticut Emergency Management and Homeland Security Statutory Authorities Summarized

Connecticut Emergency Management and Homeland Security Statutory Authorities Summarized

Date: April 2, 2004
Creator: Bea, Keith; Runyon, L. Cheryl & Warnock, Kae M
Description: This report is one of a series that profiles the emergency management and homeland security statutory authorities of the 50 states, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, and three territories (American Samoa, Guam, and the U.S. Virgin Islands). Each profile identifies the more significant elements of state statutes, generally as codified. This report focuses on the state of Connecticut.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Crime Control: The Federal Response

Crime Control: The Federal Response

Date: July 1, 2002
Creator: O'Bryant, JoAnne & Seghetti, Lisa M
Description: Under the federal system in the United States, the states and localities traditionally have held the major responsibility for prevention and control of crime and maintenance of order. For most of the Republic’s history, “police powers” in the broad sense were reserved to the states under the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution. Many still hold that view, but others see a string of court decisions in recent decades as providing the basis for a far more active federal role. Several bills are discussed in this report that address issues related to crime, juvenile justice, and school violence.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Crime Control: The Federal Response

Crime Control: The Federal Response

Date: September 23, 2003
Creator: O'Bryant, JoAnne
Description: Under the federal system in the United States, the states and localities traditionally have held the major responsibility for prevention and control of crime and maintenance of order. For most of the Republic’s history, “police powers” in the broad sense were reserved to the states under the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution. Many still hold that view, but others see a string of court decisions in recent decades as providing the basis for a far more active federal role. Several bills are discussed in this report that address issues related to crime, juvenile justice, and Congress’ evolving role in crime legislation.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Crime Control: The Federal Response

Crime Control: The Federal Response

Date: July 7, 2003
Creator: O'Bryant, JoAnne
Description: Under the federal system in the United States, the states and localities traditionally have held the major responsibility for prevention and control of crime and maintenance of order. For most of the Republic’s history, “police powers” in the broad sense were reserved to the states under the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution. Many still hold that view, but others see a string of court decisions in recent decades as providing the basis for a far more active federal role. Several bills are discussed in this report that address issues related to crime, juvenile justice, and Congress’ evolving role in crime legislation.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Crime Control: The Federal Response

Crime Control: The Federal Response

Date: May 8, 2003
Creator: O'Bryant, JoAnne
Description: Under the federal system in the United States, the states and localities traditionally have held the major responsibility for prevention and control of crime and maintenance of order. For most of the Republic’s history, “police powers” in the broad sense were reserved to the states under the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution. Many still hold that view, but others see a string of court decisions in recent decades as providing the basis for a far more active federal role. Several bills are discussed in this report that address issues related to crime, juvenile justice, and Congress’ evolving role in crime legislation.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Crime Control: The Federal Response

Crime Control: The Federal Response

Date: March 5, 2003
Creator: O'Bryant, JoAnne
Description: Under the federal system in the United States, the states and localities traditionally have held the major responsibility for prevention and control of crime and maintenance of order. For most of the Republic’s history, “police powers” in the broad sense were reserved to the states under the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution. Many still hold that view, but others see a string of court decisions in recent decades as providing the basis for a far more active federal role. Several bills are discussed in this report that address issues related to crime, juvenile justice, and Congress’ evolving role in crime legislation.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Crime Control: The Federal Response

Crime Control: The Federal Response

Date: January 25, 2003
Creator: O'Bryant, JoAnne
Description: Under the federal system in the United States, the states and localities traditionally have held the major responsibility for prevention and control of crime and maintenance of order. For most of the Republic’s history, “police powers” in the broad sense were reserved to the states under the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution. Many still hold that view, but others see a string of court decisions in recent decades as providing the basis for a far more active federal role. Several bills are discussed in this report that address issues related to crime, juvenile justice, and Congress’ evolving role in crime legislation.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Crime Control: The Federal Response

Crime Control: The Federal Response

Date: September 26, 2002
Creator: O'Bryant, JoAnne & Seghetti, Lisa M
Description: Under the federal system in the United States, the states and localities traditionally have held the major responsibility for prevention and control of crime and maintenance of order. For most of the Republic’s history, “police powers” in the broad sense were reserved to the states under the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution. Many still hold that view, but others see a string of court decisions in recent decades as providing the basis for a far more active federal role. Several bills are discussed in this report that address issues related to crime, juvenile justice, and Congress’ evolving role in crime legislation.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Crime Control: The Federal Response

Crime Control: The Federal Response

Date: September 12, 2002
Creator: O'Bryant, JoAnne & Seghetti, Lisa M
Description: Under the federal system in the United States, the states and localities traditionally have held the major responsibility for prevention and control of crime and maintenance of order. For most of the Republic’s history, “police powers” in the broad sense were reserved to the states under the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution. Many still hold that view, but others see a string of court decisions in recent decades as providing the basis for a far more active federal role. Several bills are discussed in this report that address issues related to crime, juvenile justice, and Congress’ evolving role in crime legislation.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department