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 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
Current Social Security Issues

Current Social Security Issues

Date: May 21, 1998
Creator: Koitz, David Stuart & Kollmann, Geoffrey
Description: Social Security is the focus of intense public interest. Projected long-range funding problems, public skepticism about its future, and a growing perception that Social Security will not be as good a value for future retirees as it is today are fueling calls for reform. This report, updated regularly, discusses a number of the major Social Security issues currently drawing congressional attention.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Current Social Security Issues

Current Social Security Issues

Date: May 21, 1998
Creator: Koitz, David & Kollmann, Geoffrey
Description: Social Security is the focus of intense public interest. Projected long-range funding problems, public skepticism about its future, and a growing perception that Social Security will not be as good a value for future retirees as it is today are fueling calls for reform. This report discusses a number of the major Social Security issues currently drawing congressional attention.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Social Security and the Federal Budget: What Does Social Security's Being "Off Budget" Mean?

Social Security and the Federal Budget: What Does Social Security's Being "Off Budget" Mean?

Date: July 23, 1998
Creator: Koitz, David Stuart
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Tax Code Termination Act: A Fact Sheet

Tax Code Termination Act: A Fact Sheet

Date: August 12, 1998
Creator: Bickley, James M.
Description: This report discusses the Tax Code Termination Act, which would “sunset” (repeal) the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 on December 31, 2002 and would require that any new federal tax system that is adopted be approved not later than July 4, 2002.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Social Security Taxes: Where Do Surplus Taxes Go and How Are They Used?

Social Security Taxes: Where Do Surplus Taxes Go and How Are They Used?

Date: April 3, 2000
Creator: Koitz, David Stuart
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Social Security Reform: Bills in the 106th Congress

Social Security Reform: Bills in the 106th Congress

Date: April 11, 2000
Creator: Koitz, David S.
Description: The Social Security system is projected to have long-range funding problems. Although the system’s income currently exceeds its expenditures, its trust funds are projected to be depleted in 2037. Concern about the problem and a belief that the remedy lies partly in economic growth that could be bolstered by changes to the system have led to introduction of a number of bills incorporating varying degrees of reform. This report describes the funding problem in some detail, summarizes many of the reform bills introduced in the 106th Congress, and provides a list of other related CRS reports.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Social Security: Summary of Major Changes in the Cash Benefits Program

Social Security: Summary of Major Changes in the Cash Benefits Program

Date: May 18, 2000
Creator: Kollmann, Geoffrey
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Social Security Reform: The Issue of Individual Versus Collective Investment for Retirement

Social Security Reform: The Issue of Individual Versus Collective Investment for Retirement

Date: June 2, 2000
Creator: Koitz, David Stuart
Description: This report discusses a myriad of issues have been raised in the current Social Security debate, in particular the question of whether and how the nation’s financial markets might be used to reform the system.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Social Security: Raising the Retirement Age Background and Issues

Social Security: Raising the Retirement Age Background and Issues

Date: June 7, 2000
Creator: Kollmann, Geoffrey
Description: The Social Security “full retirement age” — the age at which retired workers, aged spouses, or surviving aged spouses receive benefits that are not reduced for “early” retirement — will gradually rise from 65 to 67 beginning with people who attain age 62 in 2000 (i.e., those born in 1938). Early retirement benefits will still be available beginning at age 62 (age 60 for aged widows and widowers), but at lower levels. This report discusses bills introduced in the last four Congresses that would, among other things, accelerate the phase-in of the increase in the full retirement age to 67, raise the early retirement age to 65 or 67, and raise the full retirement age to 69 or 70.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Social Security Reform: How Much of a Role Could Personal Retirement Accounts Play?

Social Security Reform: How Much of a Role Could Personal Retirement Accounts Play?

Date: June 9, 2000
Creator: Koitz, David S.
Description: This report illustrates the potential accumulations of personal savings accounts intended for retirement savings, given a range of possible contribution amounts and interest rates. It is intended to provide information about how to evaluate the possible role of personal accounts in the debate on Social Security reform.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Social Security and the Federal Budget: What Does Social Security's Being "Off Budget" Mean?

Social Security and the Federal Budget: What Does Social Security's Being "Off Budget" Mean?

Date: July 20, 2000
Creator: Koitz, David Stuart
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Social Security and the Federal Budget: What Does Social Security's Being "Off Budget" Mean?

Social Security and the Federal Budget: What Does Social Security's Being "Off Budget" Mean?

Date: July 20, 2000
Creator: Koitz, David S.
Description: This report discusses social security and its place in the federal budget. As a result of a series of laws enacted in 1983, 1985 and 1990, Social Security is considered to be "off budget" for federal budget purposes. While the meaning of this might seem obvious--that Social Security is not to be considered as part of the federal budget--many people are confused by the continued use of aggregate budget figures that include Social Security's receipts and expenditures.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Social Security: Taxation of Benefits

Social Security: Taxation of Benefits

Date: July 28, 2000
Creator: Kollmann, Geoffrey
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Social Security's Treatment Under the Federal Budget: A Summary

Social Security's Treatment Under the Federal Budget: A Summary

Date: September 21, 2000
Creator: Koitz, David S. & Nuschler, Dawn
Description: This report discusses the treatment of Social Security in the federal budget, which has become a major fiscal policy issue. Congressional views about what to do with budget surpluses are diverse—ranging from buying down the outstanding federal debt to cutting taxes to increasing spending. However, support for the proposition of “protecting” Social Security surpluses is substantial.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Social Security Reform

Social Security Reform

Date: September 25, 2000
Creator: Koitz, David Stuart & Kollmann, Geoffrey
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Social Security Reform

Social Security Reform

Date: January 4, 2001
Creator: Koitz, David Stuart & Kollmann, Geoffrey
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Social Security Reform: Bills in the 106th Congress

Social Security Reform: Bills in the 106th Congress

Date: January 5, 2001
Creator: Koitz, David Stuart & Kollmann, Geoffrey
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Social Security and the Federal Budget: What Does Social Security's Being "Off Budget" Mean?

Social Security and the Federal Budget: What Does Social Security's Being "Off Budget" Mean?

Date: February 2, 2001
Creator: Koitz, David Stuart
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Social Security, Saving, and the Economy

Social Security, Saving, and the Economy

Date: February 15, 2001
Creator: Cashell, Brian W
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Financial Outlook for Social Security and Medicare

The Financial Outlook for Social Security and Medicare

Date: March 19, 2001
Creator: Koitz, David Stuart & Kollmann, Geoffrey
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Social Security Reform

Social Security Reform

Date: March 20, 2001
Creator: Koitz, David Stuart & Kollmann, Geoffrey
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Social Security and Medicare "Lock Boxes"

Social Security and Medicare "Lock Boxes"

Date: March 21, 2001
Creator: Koitz, David Stuart; Kollmann, Geoffrey & Nuschler, Dawn
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Social Security Benefits Are Not Paid for the Month of Death: A Fact Sheet

Social Security Benefits Are Not Paid for the Month of Death: A Fact Sheet

Date: March 21, 2001
Creator: Koitz, David Stuart
Description: Social security benefits are not paid for the month in which a recipient dies. Legislation is routinely introduced that would either pay the full amount of the benefits for the month of death or pro-rate the benefits based on the proportion of the month that the recipient was alive.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Social Security's Treatment Under the Federal Budget: A Summary

Social Security's Treatment Under the Federal Budget: A Summary

Date: March 21, 2001
Creator: Koitz, David Stuart
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department