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 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
Presidential Claims of Executive Privilege: History, Law, Practice and Recent Developments

Presidential Claims of Executive Privilege: History, Law, Practice and Recent Developments

Date: September 21, 1999
Creator: Rosenberg, Morton
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
President Bush's Judicial Nominations During the 101st and 102nd Congresses

President Bush's Judicial Nominations During the 101st and 102nd Congresses

Date: March 29, 1993
Creator: Rutkus, Denis Steven
Description: There are ten categories of courts (including the local courts of the District of Columbia) to which the President nominates judges. The report provides background and statistics concerning President Bush's judicial nominations in each court category as well as actions taken on those nominations by the United States Senate. Each of the report's ten sections discusses the composition and jurisdiction of the court in question and notes the committee to which nominations to this court were referred when received by the Senate. Also, statistics on judicial nominations received by the Senate during the four years of the Bush Presidency are presented.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Proper Scope of Questioning of Supreme Court Nominees: The Current Debate

Proper Scope of Questioning of Supreme Court Nominees: The Current Debate

Date: September 1, 2005
Creator: Rutkus, Denis Steven
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Supreme Court Appointment Process: Roles of the President, Judiciary Committee, and Senate

Supreme Court Appointment Process: Roles of the President, Judiciary Committee, and Senate

Date: July 6, 2005
Creator: Rutkus, Denis Steven
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Nominations to Article III Lower Courts by President George W. Bush During the 110th Congress

Nominations to Article III Lower Courts by President George W. Bush During the 110th Congress

Date: October 20, 2008
Creator: Rutkus, Denis Steven & Bearden, Maureen
Description: This report tracks nominations made by President George W. Bush to judgeships on the U.S. courts of appeals, the U.S. district courts, and the U.S. Court of International Trade — the lower courts on which, pursuant to Article III of the Constitution, judges serve "during good Behaviour." It lists and keeps count of all nominations made to these courts during the 110th Congress, including pertinent actions taken by the Senate Judiciary Committee and the full Senate. It also tracks the number of judicial vacancies on the courts (including vacancies classified by the federal judiciary as "judicial emergencies"), the number of nominations pending to fill the vacancies, and the names of the pending nominees. It presents the number of persons nominated by President Bush to each category of lower Article III court during his entire presidency (breaking down each total to show the number confirmed, pending, returned and not re-nominated, and withdrawn). Last, it provides tabular and graphical comparisons of President Bush's lower court nominee statistics with those of the four Presidents who immediately preceded him.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Supreme Court Nominations, 1789-2005: Actions by the Senate, Judiciary Committee, and the President

Supreme Court Nominations, 1789-2005: Actions by the Senate, Judiciary Committee, and the President

Date: January 5, 2006
Creator: Rutkus, Denis Steven & Bearden, Maureen
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Supreme Court Nominations, 1789 - 2005: Actions by the Senate, the Judiciary Committee, and the President

Supreme Court Nominations, 1789 - 2005: Actions by the Senate, the Judiciary Committee, and the President

Date: January 5, 2006
Creator: Rutkus, Denis Steven & Bearden, Maureen
Description: The process of appointing Supreme Court Justices has undergone changes over two centuries, but its most basic feature -- the sharing of power between the President and Senate -- has remained unchanged. To receive a lifetime appointment to the Court, a candidate must first be nominated by the President and then confirmed by the Senate. Table 1 of this report lists and describes actions taken by the Senate, the Senate Judiciary Committee, and the President on all Supreme Court nominations, from 1789 to the present. The table provides the name of each person nominated to the Court and the name of the President making the nomination. It also tracks the dates of formal actions taken, and time elapsing between these actions, by the Senate or Senate Judiciary Committee on each nomination, starting with the date that the Senate received the nomination from the President.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Supreme Court Nominations, 1789-2005: Actions by the Senate, the Judiciary Committee, and the President

Supreme Court Nominations, 1789-2005: Actions by the Senate, the Judiciary Committee, and the President

Date: January 5, 2006
Creator: Rutkus, Denis Steven & Bearden, Maureen
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Supreme Court Nominations, 1789 - 2009: Actions by the Senate, the Judiciary Committee, and the President

Supreme Court Nominations, 1789 - 2009: Actions by the Senate, the Judiciary Committee, and the President

Date: May 13, 2009
Creator: Rutkus, Denis Steven & Bearden, Maureen
Description: This report explains in detail the process of appointing Supreme Court Justices, both as it stands currently and how it has changed over the last two centuries. The report includes a table that lists and describes actions taken by the Senate, the Senate Judiciary Committee, and the President on all Supreme Court nominations, from 1789 to the present.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Chief Justice of the United States: Responsibilities of the Office and Process for Appointment

The Chief Justice of the United States: Responsibilities of the Office and Process for Appointment

Date: March 17, 2005
Creator: Rutkus, Denis Steven & Tong, Lorraine H
Description: As part of Senate consideration, the Judiciary Committee holds hearings on the nominee and votes on whether to report the nomination favorably, unfavorably, or without recommendation. Regardless of the outcome of that vote, the reporting of a Supreme Court nomination sends it to the full Senate for debate and a vote. Like the President, Senators may evaluate the nominee by such standards as professional excellence, integrity, and leadership qualities, but may also (again, as the President is free to do) focus on the nominee's judicial philosophy, views on constitutional issues, or how they believe the appointment might affect the Court's future direction on major legal and constitutional issues.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department