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 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
Endangered Species: Difficult Choices

Endangered Species: Difficult Choices

Date: April 3, 2002
Creator: Buck, Eugene H; Corn, M. Lynne & Baldwin, Pamela
Description: This report discusses issues debated in the 107th Congress while is considering various proposals to amend the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA). Major issues in recent years have included changing the role of science in decision-making, changing the role of critical habitat, reducing conflicts with Department of Defense activities, incorporating further protection for property owners, and increasing protection of listed species, among others. In addition, many have advocated including significant changes to ESA regulations made during the Clinton Administration in the law itself.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Endangered Species: Difficult Choices

Endangered Species: Difficult Choices

Date: September 5, 2001
Creator: Buck, Eugene H; Corn, M. Lynne & Baldwin, Pamela
Description: This report discusses issues debated in the 108th Congress while is considering various proposals to amend the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA). Major issues in recent years have included changing the role of science in decision-making, changing the role of critical habitat, reducing conflicts with Department of Defense activities, incorporating further protection for property owners, and increasing protection of listed species, among others. In addition, many have advocated including significant changes to ESA regulations made during the Clinton Administration in the law itself.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Endangered Species: Continuing Controversy

Endangered Species: Continuing Controversy

Date: November 21, 2000
Creator: Corn, M. Lynne
Description: The Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA) has been one of the most controversial of all environmental laws. Undoubtedly, the controversy stems from the strict substantive provisions of this law compared to many other environmental laws which tend to be more procedurally oriented or to permit greater administrative discretion. As a result of the ESA’s standards, the Act often plays a role in disputes in which all sides agree that a given species is not the center of the debate.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Pacific Salmon and Anadromous Trout: Management Under the Endangered Species Act

Pacific Salmon and Anadromous Trout: Management Under the Endangered Species Act

Date: October 27, 1999
Creator: Buck, Eugene H & Dandelski, John R
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Endangered Species List Revisions: A Summary of Delisting and Downlisting

Endangered Species List Revisions: A Summary of Delisting and Downlisting

Date: January 5, 1998
Creator: Noecker, Robert J
Description: This report outlines the process and reasons for delisting or downlisting, and summarizes the 27 species delisted due to extinction, recovery, or data revision, and the 22 species that have been downlisted from endangered to threatened status due to stabilized or improving populations.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Endangered Species Act Amendments: An Analysis of S. 1180 and H.R. 2351

Endangered Species Act Amendments: An Analysis of S. 1180 and H.R. 2351

Date: March 2, 1998
Creator: Baldwin, Pamela & Corn, M. Lynne
Description: Because of wide-spread interest in possible amendments to the Endangered Species Act (ESA), CRS has received numerous requests for an analysis and critique of S.1180 and H.R. 2351. This report analyzes those bills. HR. 2351 was introduced on July 31, 1997 and S. 1180 on September 16, 1997. Each bill is discussed under various topic headings. The Senate bill will be described first, since it has been reported.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
African Elephant Issues: CITES and CAMPFIRE

African Elephant Issues: CITES and CAMPFIRE

Date: August 5, 1997
Creator: Corn, M. Lynne & Fletcher, Susan R.
Description: The conservation of African elephants has been controversial recently on two fronts: the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES, to which the United States is a party), and a Zimbabwean program for sustainable development called CAMPFIRE, which is partially funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID). Two controversies have sprung up recently about the African elephant. One is the changing status of this species under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES), of which the United States is a signatory. The other is over a program in Zimbabwe called "CAMPFIRE." The partial funding of this program by the U.S. Agency for International Development has been criticized by animal welfare groups and some conservation groups, though it has been supported by other conservation groups as well as many hunting organizations.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Wildlife Restoration Projects Fund

Wildlife Restoration Projects Fund

Date: May 2, 1997
Creator: Talley, Louis Alan
Description: Since 1937, a cooperative program between the federal and state governments has existed for wildlife restoration. This program provides federal grants-in-aid to state agencies for conservation through land and water management for wild birds and mammals. While up to 8% of the collected revenues from excise taxes dedicated to the program may be retained by the federal government for administration, all remaining funds are apportioned to the states and territories for use either in wildlife restoration or hunter safety and education programs. Wildlife restoration programs receive all funds generated from the excise tax on firearms other than pistols and revolvers and all funds collected from shells and cartridges. Additionally, one-half of the excise taxes collected from pistols, revolvers, and archery equipment goes for wildlife restoration purposes. Hunter safety and education programs are funded from the remaining half of excise taxes collected on pistols, revolvers, and archery equipment. The states have been authorized by law to use hunter safety and education funds for wildlife restoration projects.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Non-Indigenous Species: Government Response to the Brown Tree Snake and Issues for Congress

Non-Indigenous Species: Government Response to the Brown Tree Snake and Issues for Congress

Date: May 2, 1997
Creator: Corn, M. Lynne
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Habitat Modification and the Endangered Species Act: The

Habitat Modification and the Endangered Species Act: The

Date: July 6, 1995
Creator: Baldwin, Pamela
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department