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 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
Ecstasy: Actions of the 107th Congress to Control MDMA
Legislation has been proposed in the 107th Congress to combat the use and abuse of Ecstasy (MDMA) and other “club drugs.” In a 2001 survey, 12% of 12th graders reported ever having taken the drug. The Ecstasy Anti-Proliferation Act of 2000, enacted by the 106th Congress, directed the U.S. Sentencing Commission to increase penalties for Ecstasy offenses. As of March 2001, MDMA penalties became more severe than for powder cocaine but less severe than for heroin. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2338/
Medicare: Major Prescription Drug Provisions of Selected Bills
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2334/
Military Medical Care Services: Questions and Answers
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2486/
AIDS in Africa
Sub-Saharan Africa has been far more severely affected by AIDS than any other part of the world. The United Nations reports that 25.3 million adults and children are infected with the HIV virus in the region, which has about 10% of the world's population but more than 70% of the worldwide total of infected people. This report discusses this issue in detail, including the cause of the African AIDS epidemic, the social and economic consequences, response and treatment, and U.S. policy. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3256/
Human Cloning
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3265/
Stem Cell Research
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3262/
Importing Prescription Drugs
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2335/
Medicare: Major Prescription Drug Provisions of Selected Bills
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2333/
Medicare: Major Prescription Drug Provisions of Selected Bills
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2332/
Ecstasy: Actions of the 107th Congress to Control MDMA
Legislation has been proposed in the 107th Congress to combat the use and abuse of Ecstasy (MDMA) and other “club drugs.” In a 2001 survey, 12% of 12th graders reported ever having taken the drug. The Ecstasy Anti-Proliferation Act of 2000, enacted by the 106th Congress, directed the U.S. Sentencing Commission to increase penalties for Ecstasy offenses. As of March 2001, MDMA penalties became more severe than for powder cocaine but less severe than for heroin. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2337/
Military Medical Care Services: Questions and Answers
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2485/
President Bush's Proposed Medicare-Endorsed Drug Discount Card Initiative: Status and Issues
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2330/
HIV/AIDS International Programs: FY2003 Request and FY2002 Spending
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3274/
Background and Legal Issues Related to Stem Cell Research
In August 2001, President Bush announced that federal funds, with certain restrictions, may be used to conduct research on human embryonic stem cells. Federal research is limited to “the more than 60” existing stem cell lines that were derived (1) with the informed consent of the donors; (2) from excess embryos created solely for reproductive purposes; and (3) without any financial inducements to the donors. No federal funds may be used for the derivation or use of stem cell lines derived from newly destroyed embryos; the creation of any human embryos for research purposes; or cloning of human embryos for any purposes. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3268/
AIDS in Africa
Sub-Saharan Africa has been far more severely affected by AIDS than any other part of the world. The United Nations reports that 25.3 million adults and children are infected with the HIV virus in the region, which has about 10% of the world's population but more than 70% of the worldwide total of infected people. This report discusses this issue in detail, including the cause of the African AIDS epidemic, the social and economic consequences, response and treatment, and U.S. policy. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3255/
HIV/AIDS International Programs: FY2003 Request and FY2002 Spending
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3273/
AIDS in Africa
Sub-Saharan Africa has been far more severely affected by AIDS than any other part of the world. The United Nations reports that 25.3 million adults and children are infected with the HIV virus in the region, which has about 10% of the world's population but more than 70% of the worldwide total of infected people. This report discusses this issue in detail, including the cause of the African AIDS epidemic, the social and economic consequences, response and treatment, and U.S. policy. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3254/
Genetic Information: Legal Issues Relating to Discrimination and Privacy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3259/
Substantive Due Process and a Right to Clone
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3240/
Ergonomics in the Workplace: Is It Time for an OSHA Standard?
Improper ergonomic design of jobs is one of the leading causes of work-related illness, accounting for perhaps a third of employers’ costs under state workers’ compensation laws. Due to the wide variety of circumstances, however, any comprehensive standard would probably have to be complex and costly, while scientific understanding of the problem is not complete. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3249/
Human Cloning
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3264/
Stem Cell Research
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3261/
Abortion Services and Military Medical Facilities
The purpose of this report is to describe and discuss the provisions for providing abortion services to military personnel, their dependents and other military health care beneficiaries at military medical facilities. The report describes the history of these provisions, with particular emphasis on legislative actions. Finally, this report discusses a number of proposals to modify the Clinton Administration provisions, as well as recently enacted legislation. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2404/
A Brief Summary of the Medical Privacy Rule
On March 27, 2002 the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) published its proposed changes to the medical privacy regulations issued by the Clinton Administration under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (“HIPAA”). HHS is accepting comments on the proposed changes until April 26, 2002. This report provides an overview of the final rule for “Standards for the Privacy of Individually Identifiable Health Information” ( “privacy rule”) that went into effect on April 14, 2001, and an overview of the Bush Administration’s proposed changes to the privacy regulation. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3266/
AIDS in Africa
Sub-Saharan Africa has been far more severely affected by AIDS than any other part of the world. The United Nations reports that 25.3 million adults and children are infected with the HIV virus in the region, which has about 10% of the world's population but more than 70% of the worldwide total of infected people. This report discusses this issue in detail, including the cause of the African AIDS epidemic, the social and economic consequences, response and treatment, and U.S. policy. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3253/
Terrorism: The New Occupational Hazard
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3229/
HIV/AIDS International Programs: FY2003 Request and FY2002 Spending
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3272/
AIDS in Africa
Sub-Saharan Africa has been far more severely affected by AIDS than any other part of the world. The United Nations reports that 25.3 million adults and children are infected with the HIV virus in the region, which has about 10% of the world's population but more than 70% of the worldwide total of infected people. This report discusses this issue in detail, including the cause of the African AIDS epidemic, the social and economic consequences, response and treatment, and U.S. policy. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3252/
Human Cloning
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3263/
AIDS in Africa
Sub-Saharan Africa has been far more severely affected by AIDS than any other part of the world. The United Nations reports that 25.3 million adults and children are infected with the HIV virus in the region, which has about 10% of the world's population but more than 70% of the worldwide total of infected people. This report discusses this issue in detail, including the cause of the African AIDS epidemic, the social and economic consequences, response and treatment, and U.S. policy. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3251/
AIDS in Africa
Sub-Saharan Africa has been far more severely affected by AIDS than any other part of the world. The United Nations reports that 25.3 million adults and children are infected with the HIV virus in the region, which has about 10% of the world's population but more than 70% of the worldwide total of infected people. This report discusses this issue in detail, including the cause of the African AIDS epidemic, the social and economic consequences, response and treatment, and U.S. policy. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3250/
Human Cloning
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1881/
AIDS in Africa
Sub-Saharan Africa has been far more severely affected by AIDS than any other part of the world. The United Nations reports that 25.3 million adults and children are infected with the HIV virus in the region, which has about 10% of the world's population but more than 70% of the worldwide total of infected people. This report discusses this issue in detail, including the cause of the African AIDS epidemic, the social and economic consequences, response and treatment, and U.S. policy. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1868/
Military Medical Care Services: Questions and Answers
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1575/
AIDS in Africa
Sub-Saharan Africa has been far more severely affected by AIDS than any other part of the world. The United Nations reports that 25.3 million adults and children are infected with the HIV virus in the region, which has about 10% of the world's population but more than 70% of the worldwide total of infected people. This report discusses this issue in detail, including the cause of the African AIDS epidemic, the social and economic consequences, response and treatment, and U.S. policy. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1867/
Medical Records Privacy: Questions and Answers on the HIPAA Final Rule
This report discusses the issue facing Congress on whether to continue to support the executive branch’s prosecution of medical marijuana patients and their providers, in accordance with marijuana’s status as a Schedule I drug under the Controlled Substances Act, or whether to relax federal marijuana prohibition enough to permit the medical use of botanical cannabis products by seriously ill persons, especially in states that have created medical marijuana programs under state law. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1458/
Prescription Drugs: Importation for Personal Use
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1522/
ERISA Regulation of Health Plans: Fact Sheet
The Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA, P.L. 93-406) places the regulation of employee benefit plans (including health plans) primarily under federal jurisdiction for about 124 million people. ERISA’s treatment of health plans is both complicated and confusing. ERISA has been interpreted as dividing health plans into two groups regulated differently under the law: about 54 million people are covered by self-insured plans for which the employer, rather than an insurer, assumes the risk for paying for covered services and about 70 million people are covered by purchased insurance (according to 2000 information from the Census Bureau and the Department of Labor). digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1814/
Patient Protection During the 107th Congress: Side-by-Side Comparison of House and Senate Bills
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1873/
Stem Cell Research
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1874/
Genetic Information: Legal Issues Relating to Discrimination and Privacy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1870/
Federal and State Causes of Action Against Health Plans Under S. 1052 and S. 889
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1880/
A Shortage of Registered Nurses: Is It on the Horizon or Already Here?
The largest, traditionally female-dominated health care occupation is registered nurses (RNs). It has been asserted that there are too few RNs available today to meet employers’ needs, that is, there is a shortage of nurses at the present time. It also has been estimated that there could well be a shortage of RNs in the not-too-distant future. This report will analyze the labor market conditions facing RNs and their employers. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1872/
AIDS in Africa
Sub-Saharan Africa has been far more severely affected by AIDS than any other part of the world. The United Nations reports that 25.3 million adults and children are infected with the HIV virus in the region, which has about 10% of the world's population but more than 70% of the worldwide total of infected people. This report discusses this issue in detail, including the cause of the African AIDS epidemic, the social and economic consequences, response and treatment, and U.S. policy. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1866/
Medicare's Skilled Nursing Facility Benefit
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1366/
Health in Developing Countries: The U.S. Response
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1735/
DNA Evidence: Legislative Initiatives in the 106th Congress
DNA evidence is a powerful forensic tool in criminal cases. Its use and capabilities have increased substantially since it was first introduced in the late 1980s. That growth has led to the emergence of the following issues that were considered by the 106th Congress in legislative initiatives: eliminating the nationwide backlog of unanalyzed DNA samples, expanding the kinds of offenders who are profiled, providing opportunities for post-conviction testing of DNA evidence, and continuing development of forensic science capabilities. This report discusses those and related issues and the legislation proposed and enacted to address them. It begins by describing provisions in prior federal law and then discusses issues and the legislation proposed, including the enacted DNA Analysis Backlog Elimination Act of 2000 (H.R. 4640, which became P.L. 106-546). digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1871/
Genetic Information: Legal Issues Relating to Discrimination and Privacy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1869/
Patient Protection and Mandatory External Review: Amending ERISA's Claims Procedure
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1813/
Labeling of Genetically Modified Foods
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1875/