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 Decade: 2010-2019
 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
Federal Statutes: What They Are and Where to Find Them

Federal Statutes: What They Are and Where to Find Them

Date: March 21, 2012
Creator: Foley, Cassandra L.
Description: After providing an overview on the basics of federal statutes, this report gives guidance on where federal statutes, in their various forms, may be located in print and on the Internet.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
International Law and Agreements: Their Effect upon U.S. Law

International Law and Agreements: Their Effect upon U.S. Law

Date: January 23, 2014
Creator: Garcia, Michael John
Description: This report provides an introduction to the roles that international law and agreements play in the United States. The report discusses forms of international agreements and the effects of international agreements on U.S. law.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Obstruction of Justice: An Abridged Overview of Related Federal Criminal Laws

Obstruction of Justice: An Abridged Overview of Related Federal Criminal Laws

Date: April 17, 2014
Creator: Doyle, Charles
Description: This report briefly discusses obstruction of justice, which is defined as the frustration of governmental purposes by violence, corruption, destruction of evidence, or deceit. This is an abridged version of CRS Report RL34304, Obstruction of Justice: An Overview of Some of the Federal Statutes That Prohibit Interference with Judicial, Executive, or Legislative Activities, by Charles Doyle, without the footnotes, quotations, or citations to authority found in the longer report.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
International Law and Agreements: Their Effect Upon U.S. Law

International Law and Agreements: Their Effect Upon U.S. Law

Date: March 1, 2013
Creator: Garcia, Michael J.
Description: This report provides an introduction to the roles that international law and agreements play in the United States. International law is derived from two primary sources — international agreements and customary practice.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Doctrine of Constitutional Avoidance: A Legal Overview

The Doctrine of Constitutional Avoidance: A Legal Overview

Date: September 2, 2014
Creator: Nolan, Andrew
Description: This report discusses select issues regarding judicial review, and offers some contemporary views on the Ashwander Doctrine, under which the Supreme Court avoids ruling decisively in cases that it deems able to be resolved outside of the court, non-constitutionally (Constitutional Avoidance).
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
International Law and Agreements: Their Effect upon U.S. Law

International Law and Agreements: Their Effect upon U.S. Law

Date: February 18, 2015
Creator: Garcia, Michael J.
Description: This report provides an introduction to the roles that international law and agreements play in the United States. This includes the role of different branches of government play in navigating such laws.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
International Law and Agreements: Their Effect Upon U.S. Law

International Law and Agreements: Their Effect Upon U.S. Law

Date: January 26, 2010
Creator: Garcia, Michael J.
Description: This report provides an introduction to the roles that international law and agreements play in the United States. International law is derived from two primary sources--international agreements and customary practice. Under the U.S. legal system, international agreements can be entered into by means of a treaty or an executive agreement. The Constitution allocates primary responsibility for entering into such agreements to the executive branch, but Congress also plays an essential role.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Independent Counsels, Special Prosecutors, Special Counsels, and the Role of Congress

Independent Counsels, Special Prosecutors, Special Counsels, and the Role of Congress

Date: June 20, 2013
Creator: Maskell, Jack
Description: Report that provides information on the procedure for the appointment of an "independent counsel," a "special prosecutor," or a "special counsel" to investigate and prosecute potential or possible violations of federal criminal law by officials in the executive branch of the federal government and in federal agencies.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Congress's Contempt Power and the Enforcement of Congressional Subpoenas: Law, History, Practice, and Procedure

Congress's Contempt Power and the Enforcement of Congressional Subpoenas: Law, History, Practice, and Procedure

Date: May 8, 2014
Creator: Garvey, Todd & Dolan, Alissa M.
Description: This report examines the source of the contempt power, reviews the historical development of the early case law, outlines the statutory and common law basis for Congress's contempt power, and analyzes the procedures associated with inherent contempt, criminal contempt, and the civil enforcement of subpoenas. It also includes a detailed discussion of two recent information access disputes that led to the approval of contempt citations in the House against then-White House Chief of Staff Joshua Bolten and former White House Counsel Harriet Miers, as well as Attorney General Eric Holder. Finally, the report discusses both non-constitutional and constitutionally-based limitations on the contempt power.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Congress's Contempt Power and the Enforcement of Congressional Subpoenas: Law, History, Practice, and Procedure

Congress's Contempt Power and the Enforcement of Congressional Subpoenas: Law, History, Practice, and Procedure

Date: April 10, 2014
Creator: Garvey, Todd & Dolan, Alissa M.
Description: This report examines the source of the contempt power, reviews the historical development of the early case law, outlines the statutory and common law basis for Congress's contempt power, and analyzes the procedures associated with inherent contempt, criminal contempt, and the civil enforcement of subpoenas. It also includes a detailed discussion of two recent information access disputes that led to the approval of contempt citations in the House against then-White House Chief of Staff Joshua Bolten and former White House Counsel Harriet Miers, as well as Attorney General Eric Holder. Finally, the report discusses both non-constitutional and constitutionally-based limitations on the contempt power.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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