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 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
Results 1471 - 1480 of 2,254
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Cuba and the State Sponsors of Terrorism List

Cuba and the State Sponsors of Terrorism List

Date: May 12, 2005
Creator: Sullivan, Mark P
Description: Cuba was first added to the State Department's list of states sponsoring international terrorism in 1982. At the time, numerous U.S. government reports and statements under the Reagan Administration alleged Cuba's ties to international terrorism and its support for terrorist groups in Latin America. Cuba remains on the state-sponsored terrorism list with four other countries: Iran, Syria, Sudan, and North Korea. Cuba's retention on the terrorism list has received more attention in recent years in light of increased support for legislative initiatives to lift some U.S. sanctions under the current economic embargo. Supporters of keeping Cuba on the terrorism list argue that there is ample evidence that Cuba supports terrorism. Critics of retaining Cuba on the terrorism list maintain that the policy is a holdover from the Cold War and that Cuba no longer supports terrorism abroad.
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U.S.-China Counter-Terrorism Cooperation: Issues for U.S. Policy

U.S.-China Counter-Terrorism Cooperation: Issues for U.S. Policy

Date: May 12, 2005
Creator: Kan, Shirley A
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Agriculture in the WTO: Limits on Domestic Support

Agriculture in the WTO: Limits on Domestic Support

Date: May 10, 2005
Creator: Schnepf, Randy
Description: Most provisions of the current “farm bill,” the Farm Security and Rural Investment Act (FSRIA) of 2002 (P.L. 107-171), do not expire until 2007. However, hearings on a 2007 farm bill could begin in late 2005. At that time, Congress will begin to examine farm income and commodity price support proposals that might succeed the programs due to expire in 2007. A key question likely to be asked of virtually every new proposal is how it will affect U.S. commitments under the WTO’s Agreement on Agriculture (AA), which commits the United States to spend no more than $19.1 billion annually on domestic farm support programs most likely to distort trade. The AA spells out the rules for countries to determine whether their policies are potentially trade distorting, and to calculate the costs. This report describes the steps for making these determinations.
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Border Security:  The Role of the U.S. Border Patrol

Border Security: The Role of the U.S. Border Patrol

Date: May 10, 2005
Creator: Nuñez-Neto, Blas
Description: This report includes some issues for Congress to consider which could include the slow rate of integration between the USBP’s biometric database of illegal aliens and the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s (FBI) biometric database of criminals and terrorists; the number of unauthorized aliens who die attempting to enter the country each year; the organized human smuggling rings that have proliferated as entering the country has become more difficult; and the threat posed by terrorists along the sparsely defended Northern border as well as the more porous Southwest border.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Middle East Peace Talks

The Middle East Peace Talks

Date: May 10, 2005
Creator: Migdalovitz, Carol
Description: None
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Border Security:  Key Agencies and Their Missions

Border Security: Key Agencies and Their Missions

Date: May 9, 2005
Creator: Nuñez-Neto, Blas
Description: After the massive reorganization of federal agencies precipitated by the creation of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), there are now four main federal agencies charged with securing the United States’ borders: the Bureau of Customs and Border Protection (CBP), which patrols the border and conducts immigrations, customs, and agricultural inspections at ports of entry; the Bureau of Immigrations and Customs Enforcement (ICE), which investigates immigrations and customs violations in the interior of the country; the United States Coast Guard, which provides maritime and port security; and the Transportation Security Administration (TSA), which is responsible for securing the nation’s land, rail, and air transportation networks. This report is meant to serve as a primer on the key federal agencies charged with border security; as such it will briefly describe each agency’s role in securing our nation’s borders.
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North Korea's Nuclear Weapons Program

North Korea's Nuclear Weapons Program

Date: May 6, 2005
Creator: Niksch, Larry A
Description: None
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East Timor: Potential Issues for Congress

East Timor: Potential Issues for Congress

Date: May 4, 2005
Creator: Margesson, Rhoda & Vaughn, Bruce
Description: This report discusses congressional concerns, which focus on security and the role of the United Nations (U.N.), human rights, and East Timor's boundary disputes with Australia and Indonesia. East Timor emerged in 2002 as an independent state after a long history of Portugese colonialism and later, Indonesian rule. Under several different mandates, the United Nations has provided peacekeeping, humanitarian and reconstruction assistance, and capacity building to establish a functioning government. Many challenges remain, including the need for economic development and sustained support by the international community.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
International Financial Institutions:  Funding U.S. Participation

International Financial Institutions: Funding U.S. Participation

Date: May 3, 2005
Creator: Sanford, Jonathan E
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The European Union in 2005 and Beyond

The European Union in 2005 and Beyond

Date: May 2, 2005
Creator: Archick, Kristin
Description: The European Union (EU) experienced significant changes in 2004 as it enlarged from 15 to 25 members and continued work on a new constitutional treaty to institute internal reforms and further EU political integration. In 2005, the EU is expected to build on these efforts and seek to implement several recent foreign policy and defense initiatives. This report describes the current status of the EU’s “constitution,” EU enlargement, the EU’s evolving foreign and defense policies, and possible implications for U.S.-EU relations.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department