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 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
The Department of Defense Rules for Military Commissions: Analysis of Procedural Rules and Comparison with Proposed Legislation and the Uniform Code of Military Justice
This report provides a background and analysis comparing military commissions as envisioned under M.C.O. No. 1 to general military courts-martial conducted under the UCMJ. The report notes some of the criticism directed at the President’s M.O., and explains how those concerns are addressed by the military commission orders and instructions. The report provides two charts to compare the regulations issued by the Department of Defense and standard procedures for general courts-martial under the Manual for Courts-Martial. The second chart, which compares procedural safeguards incorporated in the regulations with established procedures in courts martial, follows the same order and format used in CRS Report RL31262, Selected Procedural Safeguards in Federal, Military, and International Courts, in order to facilitate comparison with safeguards provided in federal court and the International Criminal Court. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs9774/
Singapore-U.S. Free Trade Agreement
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5595/
Balkan Cooperation on War Crimes Issues
From late 2004 through early 2005, a combination of intensified international pressure and deadlines associated with Euro- Atlantic integration processes prompted a spate of transfers of indicted persons to the tribunal. Full cooperation with ICTY is a key prerequisite to further progress toward a shared long-term goal for the western Balkan countries: closer association with and eventual membership in the European Union (EU) and NATO. As of March 2006, six persons indicted by the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) remained at large, including wartime Bosnian Serb leaders Radovan Karadzic and Gen. Ratko Mladic. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs8783/
India and Pakistan: U.S. Economic Sanctions
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5088/
Saudi Arabia: Terrorist Financing Issues
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5995/
The U.N. Convention Against Torture: Overview of U.S. Implementation Policy Concerning the Removal of Aliens
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5990/
Saudi Arabia: Terrorist Financing Issues
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5994/
Port and Maritime Security: Potential for Terrorist Nuclear Attack Using Oil Tankers
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5955/
North Korea: Chronology of Provocations, 1950-2003
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5079/
Weapons of Mass Destruction Counterproliferation: Legal Issues for Ships and Aircraft
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5698/
U.S.-China Counter-Terrorism Cooperation: Issues for U.S. Policy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5840/
Africa: Trade and Development Initiatives by the Clinton Administration and Congress
In February 1997, the Clinton Administration submitted the second of five annual reports on the Administration's Comprehensive Trade and Development Policy for Africa as required by section 134 of the Uruguay Round Agreements Act (House Document 103-3415, Vol. 1.). On April 24, 1997, members of the African Trade and Investment Caucus introduced a bill, H.R. 1432, on U.S.-Africa trade and investment issues. In his State of the Union address in January 1998, President Clinton called on Congress to pass the trade legislation. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs813/
South Africa: U.S. Policy After Sanctions
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs8877/
Sanctions against South Africa: Activities of the 99th Congress
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs8876/
Transnational Organized Crime: Principal Threats and U.S. Responses
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs9996/
Iraqi Compliance with Cease-Fire Agreements
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1571/
The Department of Defense Rules for Military Commissions: Analysis of Procedural Rules and Comparison with Proposed Legislation and the Uniform Code of Military Justice
This report provides a background and analysis comparing military commissions as envisioned under Military Commission Order (M.C.O.) No. 1 and general military courts-martial conducted under the Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ). The report notes some of the criticism directed at the President's Military Order (M.O.), and explains how those concerns are addressed by the military commission orders and instructions. The report concludes by summarizing legislation introduced to authorize and regulate military tribunals to try suspected Al Qaeda and Taliban members, and provides two charts to compare the proposed military tribunals under proposed legislation, the regulations issued by the Department of Defense, and standard procedures for general courts-martial under the Manual for Courts-Martial. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs10202/
Nuclear Arms Control: The U.S.-Russian Agenda
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2495/
Nuclear Arms Control: The U.S.-Russian Agenda
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2497/
Nuclear Arms Control: The U.S.-Russian Agenda
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2498/
Nuclear Arms Control: The U.S.-Russian Agenda
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2494/
Nuclear Arms Control: The U.S.-Russian Agenda
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2499/
Nuclear Arms Control: The U.S.-Russian Agenda
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2496/
Nuclear Arms Control: The U.S.-Russian Agenda
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2493/
Nuclear Arms Control: The Strategic Offensive Reductions Treaty
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs8365/
Nuclear Arms Control: The U.S.-Russian Agenda
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs8366/
Balkan Cooperation on War Crimes Issues: 2005 Update
A combination of intensified international pressure and deadlines associated with Euro-Atlantic integration processes has prompted a spate of transfers of persons indicted for war crimes to the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) in The Hague in late 2004-early 2005. Full cooperation with The Hague tribunal has been established as a key prerequisite to further progress toward a shared long-term goal for the western Balkan countries: closer association with and eventual membership in the European Union (EU) and NATO. This report is updated as the number of individuals indicted for war crimes have been transferred to The Hague from Serbia, Kosovo, and Bosnia. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6280/
U.S.-China Counter-Terrorism Cooperation: Issues for U.S. Policy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6505/
The Department of Defense Rules for Military Commissions: Analysis of Procedural Rules and Comparison with Proposed Legislation and the Uniform Code of Military Justice
This report provides a background and analysis comparing military commissions as envisioned under M.C.O. No. 1 to general military courts-martial conducted under the UCMJ. The report notes some of the criticism directed at the President’s M.O., and explains how those concerns are addressed by the military commission orders and instructions. The report provides two charts to compare the regulations issued by the Department of Defense and standard procedures for general courts-martial under the Manual for Courts-Martial. The second chart, which compares procedural safeguards incorporated in the regulations with established procedures in courts martial, follows the same order and format used in CRS Report RL31262, Selected Procedural Safeguards in Federal, Military, and International Courts, in order to facilitate comparison with safeguards provided in federal court and the International Criminal Court. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6166/
Nuclear Arms Control: The Strategic Offensive Reductions Treaty
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6182/
Nuclear Arms Control: The U.S.-Russian Agenda
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6181/
Iraq: Weapons Threat, Compliance, Sanctions, and U.S. Policy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2475/
Iraq: Compliance, Sanctions, and U.S. Policy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2472/
Iraq: Compliance, Sanctions, and U.S. Policy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2471/
Iraq: Weapons Threat, Compliance, Sanctions, and U.S. Policy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2477/
Iraq: Compliance, Sanctions, and U.S. Policy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2470/
Iraq: Weapons Threat, Compliance, Sanctions, and U.S. Policy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2478/
Iraq: Compliance, Sanctions, and U.S. Policy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2474/
Iraq: Weapons Threat, Compliance, Sanctions, and U.S. Policy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2479/
Iraq: Weapons Threat, Compliance, Sanctions, and U.S. Policy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2476/
Iraq: Compliance, Sanctions, and U.S. Policy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2473/
Africa and the War on Terrorism
African countries overwhelmingly expressed their support for the U.S.-led efforts on the war against terrorism shortly after the September 11 attacks on New York and Washington. Some African countries are reportedly sharing intelligence and are coordinating with Washington to fight terrorism in Africa. Administration officials believe that Africa is a potential breeding ground for terrorism. Some African officials are concerned that despite the strong support African governments have provided to the anti-terror campaign, they are not seen as real coalition partners in the fight against terrorism. African officials note that cooperation between the United States and Africa in the fight against terrorism should also include extraditing and apprehending members of African terrorist and extremist groups active in Europe and the United States. They argue that these groups are raising funds and organizing in the west, often unhindered by western governments. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2378/
Iraq: Compliance, Sanctions, and U.S. Policy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2468/
Iraq: Compliance, Sanctions, and U.S. Policy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2469/
Saudi Arabia: Terrorist Financing Issues
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6685/
Nuclear Arms Control: The U.S.-Russian Agenda
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6661/
Balkan Cooperation on War Crimes Issues
In early May 2006, assessments of insufficient Serbian cooperation with the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) led the European Union (EU) to suspend association talks with Serbia. Later that month, the U.S. Secretary of State withheld certification of full Serbian cooperation with ICTY, leading to a partial suspension of U.S. bilateral assistance to Serbia. From late 2004 through early 2005, a combination of intensified international pressure and deadlines associated with Euro-Atlantic integration processes prompted a spate of transfers of indicted persons to the tribunal. Full cooperation with ICTY is a key prerequisite to further progress toward a shared long-term goal for the western Balkan countries: closer association with and eventual membership in the European Union and NATO. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs10225/
The Department of Defense Rules for Military Commissions: Analysis of Procedural Rules and Comparison with Proposed Legislation and the Uniform Code of Military Justice
This report provides a background and analysis comparing military commissions as envisioned under M.C.O. (Military Commission Order) No. 1 to general military courts-martial conducted under the UCMJ. The report notes some of the criticism directed at the President's M.O., and explains how those concerns are addressed by the military commission orders and instructions. A summary of the Hamdan case follows, as well as an overview of relevant legislation. Finally, the report provides two charts to compare the regulations issued by the Department of Defense to standard procedures for general courts-martial under the Manual for Courts-Martial and to proposed legislation. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs10212/
Current U.S. Sanctions Against China
In the months following China's 1989 Tiananmen Square crackdown, both the President and the Congress took a number of initiatives protesting Beijing's actions. These initiatives centered around U.S. concerns related to trade, human rights, and non-proliferation. In intervening years, the United States has periodically imposed, lifted, or waived other sanctions and concluded several trade-related agreements with China relating to these concerns. Those measures that remain in place in 1994 are detailed in the accompanying tables. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs121/
Saudi Arabia: Terrorist Financing Issues
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs8672/