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 Country: Iraq
 Decade: 2010-2019
 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
Iraq: Politics, Governance, and Human Rights

Iraq: Politics, Governance, and Human Rights

Date: May 18, 2011
Creator: Katzman, Kenneth.
Description: Iraq's political system is increasingly characterized by peaceful competition and formation of cross-sectarian alliances. However, ethnic and sectarian political and sometimes violent infighting continues, often involving the questionable use of key levers of power and legal institutions. This infighting-and the belief that holding political power may mean the difference between life and death for the various political communities-significantly delayed agreement on a new government that was to be selected following the March 7, 2010, national elections for the Council of Representatives (COR, parliament). With U.S. diplomatic help, on November 10, 2010, major ethnic and sectarian factions agreed on a framework for a new government, breaking the long deadlock. The agreement, under which Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki is serving a second term, was implemented when a broad-based cabinet was confirmed on December 21, 2010.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
U.S.-Iraw Withdrawal/Status of Forces Agreement: Issues for Congressional Oversight

U.S.-Iraw Withdrawal/Status of Forces Agreement: Issues for Congressional Oversight

Date: January 21, 2011
Creator: Mason, Chuck R.
Description: This report begins by discussing the historical legal framework governing U.S. military operations in Iraq. The report then provides a general background as to the contents of agreements traditionally considered Status of Forces Agreements (SOFAs). Finally, the report discusses specific aspects of the SOFA, highlighting issues that may require continued congressional oversight.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Kurds in Post-Saddam Iraq

The Kurds in Post-Saddam Iraq

Date: October 1, 2010
Creator: Katzman, Kenneth
Description: The Kurdish-inhabited region of northern Iraq is relatively peaceful and prospering economically, but the Iraqi Kurds' political autonomy and political strength in post- Saddam Iraq is causing friction with Arab leaders in Iraq, Turkey, and Iran. However, an overall reduction in violence in Iraq, coupled with continued U.S. political influence over the Kurds, is likely to prevent a destabilizing escalation of the Iraqi Kurd-Arab disputes. Also see CRS Report RL31339, Iraq: Post-Saddam Governance and Security, by Kenneth Katzman.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department