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 Decade: 2000-2009
 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
The World Trade Organization: Background and Issues
The World Trade Organization (WTO), which was established on January 1, 1995, is the principal organization for rules governing international trade. This report provides general background on the WTO: its establishment, principles, administrative bodies, and membership. It also includes a brief discussion of policy issues pertaining to the WTO agenda, U.S. sovereignty and membership in the WTO, the congressional role in U.S. participation in the WTO, and pursuit of U.S. trade goals in the WTO compared to other options. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1835/
The World Trade Organization: Background and Issues
The World Trade Organization (WTO) was established on January 1, 1995, under an agreement reached during the Uruguay Round of multilateral trade negotiations. The Uruguay Round was the last of a series of periodic trade negotiations held under the auspices of the WTO’s predecessor, the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT). Among the questions asked during debate on U.S. trade policy and the WTO are: To what extent should the United States meet its trade goals in theWTO versus other options? Can the United States maintain its sovereignty as a member of the WTO? Are U.S. interests served through the WTO dispute process? Should the WTO continue to cover traditional trade issues only, or should it be broadened to include nontraditional issues such as labor and the environment? What is the role of Congress in U.S. participation in the WTO? digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1834/
The World Trade Organization: Background and Issues
The World Trade Organization (WTO) was established on January 1, 1995, under an agreement reached during the Uruguay Round of multilateral trade negotiations. The Uruguay Round was the last of a series of periodic trade negotiations held under the auspices of the WTO’s predecessor, the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT). Among the questions asked during debate on U.S. trade policy and the WTO are: To what extent should the United States meet its trade goals in theWTO versus other options? Can the United States maintain its sovereignty as a member of the WTO? Are U.S. interests served through the WTO dispute process? Should the WTO continue to cover traditional trade issues only, or should it be broadened to include nontraditional issues such as labor and the environment? What is the role of Congress in U.S. participation in the WTO? digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5061/
Foreign Terrorist Organizations
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The European Union in 2006 and Beyond
The European Union (EU) experienced significant changes in 2004 as it enlarged from 15 to 25 members and continued work on a new constitutional treaty to institute internal reforms and further EU political integration. In 2005, the EU is expected to build on these efforts and seek to implement several recent foreign policy and defense initiatives. This report describes the current status of the EU’s “constitution,” EU enlargement, the EU’s evolving foreign and defense policies, and possible implications for U.S.-EU relations. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs9017/
The European Union in 2005 and Beyond
The European Union (EU) experienced significant changes in 2004 as it enlarged from 15 to 25 members and continued work on a new constitutional treaty to institute internal reforms and further EU political integration. In 2005, the EU is expected to build on these efforts and seek to implement several recent foreign policy and defense initiatives. This report describes the current status of the EU’s “constitution,” EU enlargement, the EU’s evolving foreign and defense policies, and possible implications for U.S.-EU relations. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6721/
The European Union in 2005 and Beyond
The European Union (EU) experienced significant changes in 2004 as it enlarged from 15 to 25 members and continued work on a new constitutional treaty to institute internal reforms and further EU political integration. In 2005, the EU is expected to build on these efforts and seek to implement several recent foreign policy and defense initiatives. This report describes the current status of the EU’s “constitution,” EU enlargement, the EU’s evolving foreign and defense policies, and possible implications for U.S.-EU relations. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6720/
The European Union in 2005 and Beyond
The European Union (EU) experienced significant changes in 2004 as it enlarged from 15 to 25 members and continued work on a new constitutional treaty to institute internal reforms and further EU political integration. In 2005, the EU is expected to build on these efforts and seek to implement several recent foreign policy and defense initiatives. This report describes the current status of the EU’s “constitution,” EU enlargement, the EU’s evolving foreign and defense policies, and possible implications for U.S.-EU relations. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6275/
The European Union in 2005 and Beyond
The European Union (EU) experienced significant changes in 2004 as it enlarged from 15 to 25 members and continued work on a new constitutional treaty to institute internal reforms and further EU political integration. In 2005, the EU is expected to build on these efforts and seek to implement several recent foreign policy and defense initiatives. This report describes the current status of the EU’s “constitution,” EU enlargement, the EU’s evolving foreign and defense policies, and possible implications for U.S.-EU relations. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6719/
Northern Ireland: The Peace Process
For years, the British and Irish governments have sought to facilitate a peaceful settlement to the conflict in Northern Ireland. After many ups and downs, the two government and the parties participating in the peace talks announced an agreement on April 10, 1998. The implementation of the resulting Good Friday Agreement continues to be difficult. A political stalemate in Northern Ireland since 2002 has halted the peace process and forced London to suspend the devolved government and to resume governance of the province. British and Irish leaders have set a November 24, 2006, deadline to revive talks on governance in Northern Ireland. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs10256/
Northern Ireland: The Peace Process
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Northern Ireland: The Peace Process
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Extradition To and From the United States: Overview of the Law and Recent Treaties
“Extradition” is the formal surrender of a person by a State to another State for prosecution or punishment. Extradition to or from the United States is a creature of treaty. The United States has extradition treaties with over a hundred of the nations of the world. International terrorism and drug trafficking have made extradition an increasingly important law enforcement tool. This is a brief overview of federal law in the area and of the adjustments in recent treaties to make them more responsive to American law enforcement interests. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7063/
Terrorism: Near Eastern Groups and State Sponsors, 2001
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Terrorism: Near Eastern Groups and State Sponsors, 2002
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3207/
Why Certain Trade Agreements Are Approved as Congressional-Executive Agreements Rather Than as Treaties
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1991/
Terrorist Attack on USS Cole: Background and Issues for Congress
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Terrorism: Automated Lookout Systems and Border Security Options and Issues
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1826/
United Nations System Funding: Congressional Issues
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs9863/
Al Qaeda: Statements and Evolving Ideology
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs8269/
Al Qaeda After the Iraq Conflict
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5089/
Al Qaeda: Statements and Evolving Ideology
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5999/
Industry Trade Effects Related to NAFTA
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5580/
International Terrorism in South Asia
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5091/
Why Certain Trade Agreements Are Approved as Congressional-Executive Agreements Rather Than as Treaties
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5545/
Civilian Patrols Along the Border: Legal and Policy Issues
This report opens with a discussion on the federal authority to enforce immigration law at the border and some U.S. Border Patrol operations that have affected illegal migration patterns along the southwest border. Next, the report provides a history of civilian border patrol groups, with a particular focus on the “Minuteman Project” and other groups operating along the southwest border. It then highlights issues of authority that might arise, and includes, as an appendix, a table that sets forth various state laws that may be useful to civilians performing immigration-related enforcement activities. The report also addresses some of the legal and policy issues, as mentioned above, that have surfaced from civilian involvement in immigration enforcement at the border. The report concludes with summaries of legislation introduced in the 109th Congress that address the use of civilian border patrols. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs9015/
Interrogation of Detainees: Overview of the McCain Amendment
Controversy has arisen regarding U.S. treatment of enemy combatants and terrorist suspects detained in Iraq, Afghanistan, and other locations, and whether such treatment complies with related U.S. statutes and treaties. Certain provisions of the Detainee Treatment Act (DTA), first introduced by Senator John McCain, have popularly been referred to as the "McCain Amendment." This report discusses the McCain amendment and the application of the McCain amendment by the Department of Defense (DOD) in the updated 2006 version of the Army Field Manual. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs10291/
Why Certain Trade Agreements Are Approved as Congressional-Executive Agreements Rather Than as Treaties
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Al Qaeda: Statements and Evolving Ideology
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6692/
Palestinian Factions
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6954/
Al Qaeda: Profile and Threat Assessment
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6277/
Al Qaeda: Statements and Evolving Ideology
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6273/
United Nations System Funding: Congressional Issues
This report tracks the process by which Congress provides the funding for U.S. assessed contributions to the regular budgets of the United Nations, its agencies, and U.N. peacekeeping operation accounts, as well as for U.S. voluntary contributions to U.N. system programs and funds. It includes information on the President's request and the congressional response, as well as congressional initiatives during this legislative process. Basic information is provided to help the reader understand this process. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs10295/
NATO in Afghanistan: A Test of the Transatlantic Alliance
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International Terrorism: Threat, Policy, and Response
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International Terrorism: Threat, Policy, and Response
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Why Certain Trade Agreements Are Approved as Congressional-Executive Agreements Rather Than as Treaties
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3510/
Why Certain Trade Agreements Are Approved as Congressional-Executive Agreements Rather Than as Treaties
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3507/
Why Certain Trade Agreements Are Approved as Congressional-Executive Agreements Rather Than as Treaties
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3509/
The PLO and Its Factions
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3211/
Industry Trade Effects Related to NAFTA
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3546/
State, Foreign Operations, and Related Programs: FY2010 Budget and Appropriations
The annual State, Foreign Operations, and Related Agencies appropriations bill is the primary legislative vehicle through which Congress reviews the U.S. international affairs budget and influences executive branch foreign policy making in general. On May 7, 2009, President Obama submitted a budget proposal for FY2010 that requests $53.9 billion for the international affairs budget. This report analyzes the FY2010 request, recent-year funding trends, and congressional action for FY2010. To date, this includes the introduction and committee approval of H.R. 3081, the House State-Foreign Operations Appropriations bill for FY2010. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc26181/
State, Foreign Operations, and Related Programs: FY2009 Appropriations
This report analyzes the FY2009 request and recent-year funding trends; it will track major foreign policy issues Congress may consider and will highlight congressional action throughout the appropriations process including the congressional report. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc462532/
State, Foreign Operations, and Related Programs: FY2010 Budget and Appropriations
This report analyzes the FY2010 request, recent-year funding trends, and congressional action for FY2010, which includes the July 9 House approval of H.R. 3081, the State-Foreign Operations Appropriations bill for FY2010, and July 9 Senate Appropriations Committee passage of its bill (S. 1434). digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc627176/
Border Security: Key Agencies and Their Missions
After the massive reorganization of federal agencies precipitated by the creation of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), there are now four main federal agencies charged with securing the United States’ borders: the Bureau of Customs and Border Protection (CBP), which patrols the border and conducts immigrations, customs, and agricultural inspections at ports of entry; the Bureau of Immigrations and Customs Enforcement (ICE), which investigates immigrations and customs violations in the interior of the country; the United States Coast Guard, which provides maritime and port security; and the Transportation Security Administration (TSA), which is responsible for securing the nation’s land, rail, and air transportation networks. This report is meant to serve as a primer on the key federal agencies charged with border security; as such it will briefly describe each agency’s role in securing our nation’s borders. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs10146/
Terrorist Capabilities for Cyberattack: Overview and Policy Issues
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Latin America: Terrorism Issues
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs10147/
The Law of the Sea Convention and U.S. Policy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1838/
The Shib'a Farms Dispute and Its Implications
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7570/
Terrorism and the Law of War: Trying Terrorists as War Criminals before Military Commissions
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1842/
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