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 Country: China
 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
China: Economic Sanctions

China: Economic Sanctions

Date: May 18, 2005
Creator: Rennack, Dianne E
Description: This report discusses a list of economic sanctions that the United States currently maintains against China. The influence of Congress on U.S. policy toward China, once significant because so much hung on the annual possibility that favorable trade terms could be suspended, has more recently been diffused. Sanctions that remain in place today can all be modified, eased, or lifted altogether by the President, without congressional input.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Taiwan's Accession to the WTO and Its Economic Relations with the United States and China

Taiwan's Accession to the WTO and Its Economic Relations with the United States and China

Date: April 14, 2005
Creator: Morrison, Wayne M
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
China's Relations with Central Asian States and Problems with Terrorism

China's Relations with Central Asian States and Problems with Terrorism

Date: October 7, 2002
Creator: McNeal, Dewardric L & Dumbaugh, Kerry
Description: This report provides an overview of the Muslim separatist movement in China’s northwestern Xinjiang Uighur Autonomous Region, China’s attempts to stifle activities which it considers terrorism, and implications for U.S. policy. Some analysts suggest that the U.S.-led campaign against terrorism may make it difficult to pressure the Chinese government on human rights and religious freedoms, particularly as they relate to Uighur Muslims in Xinjiang.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
U.S.-China Counter-Terrorism Cooperation: Issues for U.S. Policy

U.S.-China Counter-Terrorism Cooperation: Issues for U.S. Policy

Date: May 12, 2005
Creator: Kan, Shirley A
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Taiwan's Accession to the WTO and its Economic Relations with the United States and China

Taiwan's Accession to the WTO and its Economic Relations with the United States and China

Date: May 16, 2003
Creator: Morrison, Wayne M
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Agriculture and China's Accession to the World Trade Organization

Agriculture and China's Accession to the World Trade Organization

Date: March 13, 2001
Creator: Hanrahan, Charles E
Description: The prospect of future growth in demand for agricultural products makes China’s accession to the World Trade Organization (WTO) an important issue for the U.S. agricultural sector. Most agricultural interest groups strongly support China’s entry into the WTO, because they think it will increase U.S. agricultural exports and enhance farm income. In the 107th Congress, attention is focused on China’s final WTO accession negotiations where differences over agriculture have become an issue.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
China and the World Trade Organization

China and the World Trade Organization

Date: August 6, 2003
Creator: Morrison, Wayne M
Description: China has sought over the past several years to become a member of the World Trade Organization (WTO), the international agency that administers multilateral trade rules. China’s WTO membership (as well as that of Taiwan’s) was formally approved at the WTO Ministerial Conference in Doha, Qatar in November 2001. On December 11, 2001, China officially became a WTO member. WTO membership will require China to significantly liberalize its trade and investment regimes, which could produce significant new commercial opportunities for U.S. businesses. A main concern for Congress is to ensure that China fully complies with its WTO commitments.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
China and the World Trade Organization

China and the World Trade Organization

Date: February 20, 2003
Creator: Morrison, Wayne M
Description: China has sought over the past several years to become a member of the World Trade Organization (WTO), the international agency that administers multilateral trade rules. China’s WTO membership (as well as that of Taiwan’s) was formally approved at the WTO Ministerial Conference in Doha, Qatar in November 2001. On December 11, 2001, China officially became a WTO member. WTO membership will require China to significantly liberalize its trade and investment regimes, which could produce significant new commercial opportunities for U.S. businesses. A main concern for Congress is to ensure that China fully complies with its WTO commitments.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
China and the World Trade Organization

China and the World Trade Organization

Date: April 2, 2002
Creator: Morrison, Wayne M
Description: China has sought over the past several years to become a member of the World Trade Organization (WTO), the international agency that administers multilateral trade rules. China’s WTO membership (as well as that of Taiwan’s) was formally approved at the WTO Ministerial Conference in Doha, Qatar in November 2001. On December 11, 2001, China officially became a WTO member. WTO membership will require China to significantly liberalize its trade and investment regimes, which could produce significant new commercial opportunities for U.S. businesses. A main concern for Congress is to ensure that China fully complies with its WTO commitments.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
China and the World Trade Organization

China and the World Trade Organization

Date: January 17, 2002
Creator: Morrison, Wayne M
Description: China has sought over the past several years to become a member of the World Trade Organization (WTO), the international agency that administers multilateral trade rules. China’s WTO membership (as well as that of Taiwan’s) was formally approved at the WTO Ministerial Conference in Doha, Qatar in November 2001. On December 11, 2001, China officially became a WTO member. WTO membership will require China to significantly liberalize its trade and investment regimes, which could produce significant new commercial opportunities for U.S. businesses. A main concern for Congress is to ensure that China fully complies with its WTO commitments.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department