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 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
Basic Questions on U.S. Citizenship and Naturalization

Basic Questions on U.S. Citizenship and Naturalization

Date: March 3, 1992
Creator: Eig, Larry M.
Description: U.S. citizenship is conferred at birth under the principle of jus soli (nationality of place of birth) and the principle of jus sanguinis (nationality of parents). The U.S. Constitution states as a fundamental rule of jus soli citizenship that "all persons born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the State wherein they reside." The exceptions to universal citizenship comprehended by the requirement that a person be born "subject to the jurisdiction thereof" include: (1) children born to a foreign sovereign or accredited diplomatic official; (2) children born on a foreign public vessel, such as a warship; (3) children born to an alien enemy in hostile occupation; and (4) native Indians.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Alien Tort Statute: Legislative History and Executive Branch Views

The Alien Tort Statute: Legislative History and Executive Branch Views

Date: October 2, 2003
Creator: Elsea, Jennifer K
Description: The report provides a historical overview of court decisions interpreting the Alien Tort Statute (ATS), also known as the Alien Tort Claims Act (ACTA). The report then provides an overview of the positions taken by the U.S. government in published opinions of the Attorney General and in court briefs related to ATS claims.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Selected Procedural Safeguards in Federal, Military, and International Courts

Selected Procedural Safeguards in Federal, Military, and International Courts

Date: January 30, 2002
Creator: Elsea, Jennifer K
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Selected Procedural Safeguards in Federal, Military, and International Courts

Selected Procedural Safeguards in Federal, Military, and International Courts

Date: September 18, 2006
Creator: Elsea, Jennifer K
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Selected Procedural Safeguards in Federal, Military, and International Courts

Selected Procedural Safeguards in Federal, Military, and International Courts

Date: September 18, 2006
Creator: Elsea, Jennifer K.
Description: This report provides a brief overview of procedural rules applicable in selected historical and contemporary tribunals for the trials of war crimes suspects. The chart that follows compares selected procedural safeguards employed in criminal trials in federal criminal court with parallel protective measures in military general courts-martial, international military tribunals used after World War II, including the International Military Tribunal (IMT or "Nuremberg Tribunal"), and the International Criminal Courts for the former Yugoslavis (ICTY) and Rwanda (ICTR).
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Passports: Current Regulations

Passports: Current Regulations

Date: April 30, 2009
Creator: Epstein, Susan B.
Description: This report details changes made to travel between the United States and other countries in the Western Hemisphere, including Canada, Mexico, Bermuda, and the Caribbean island nations. Such changes include the expansion of time necessary to get a passport, as well as additional passport and proof-of-identity documentation requirements.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Foreign Medical Graduates: A Brief Overview of the J-1 Visa Waiver Program

Foreign Medical Graduates: A Brief Overview of the J-1 Visa Waiver Program

Date: June 5, 2008
Creator: Ester, Karma
Description: The Educational and Cultural Exchange Visitor program has become a gateway for foreign medical graduates (FMGs) to gain admission to the United States as nonimmigrants for the purpose of graduate medical education and training. These FMGs either enter under the J-1 nonimmigrant visa or receive waivers that require them to work in a designated healthcare professional shortage area for a minimum of three years. The ability of states to request such waivers is known as the "Conrad State Program," and was added temporarily to the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) in 1994. It has been extended by the last several Congresses. Legislation has been introduced in the 110th Congress to address the program's expiration.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Immigration: S Visas for Criminal and Terrorist Informants

Immigration: S Visas for Criminal and Terrorist Informants

Date: May 17, 2006
Creator: Ester, Karma
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Immigration: S Visas for Criminal and Terrorist Informants

Immigration: S Visas for Criminal and Terrorist Informants

Date: December 3, 2001
Creator: Ester, Karma
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Immigration: S Visas for Criminal and Terrorist Informants

Immigration: S Visas for Criminal and Terrorist Informants

Date: May 17, 2006
Creator: Ester, Karma
Description: In response to the terrorist acts of September 11, 2001, Congress passed legislation making permanent a provision that allows aliens with critical information on criminal or terrorist organizations to come into the United States to provide information to law enforcement officials. The law (S. 1424, and then P.L. 107-45) amended the Immigration and Nationality Act to provide permanent authority for the administration of the "S" visa, which was scheduled to expire on September 13, 2001. On November 29, 2001, then-Attorney General John Ashcroft announced the "Responsible Cooperators Program" to reach out to persons who may be eligible for the S visa. Up to 200 criminal informants and 50 terrorist informants may be admitted annually. Since FY2005, more than 500 informants and their accompanying family members have entered on S visas. No terrorist informants have been admitted into the U.S. since 1996.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department