You limited your search to:

 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
Critical Infrastructure Information Disclosure and Homeland Security
This report discusses the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) that was passed to ensure by statute citizen access to government information. Nine categories of information may be exempted from disclosure. Three of the nine exemptions provide possible protection against the release of critical infrastructure information: exemption 1 (national security information); exemption 3 (information exempted by statute); and exemption 4 (confidential business information). Congress has considered several proposals to exempt critical infrastructure information from the FOIA. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3914/
Critical Infrastructure Information Disclosure and Homeland Security
This report discusses the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) that was passed to ensure by statute citizen access to government information. Nine categories of information may be exempted from disclosure. Three of the nine exemptions provide possible protection against the release of critical infrastructure information: exemption 1 (national security information); exemption 3 (information exempted by statute); and exemption 4 (confidential business information). Congress has considered several proposals to exempt critical infrastructure information from the FOIA. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2244/
Freedom of Information Act Amendments: 109th Congress
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6139/
Senate Committee Reports: Required Contents
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3961/
Conference Reports and Joint Explanatory Statements
The conference report presents the formal legislative language on which the conference committee has agreed. The joint explanatory statement explains the various elements of the conferees’ agreement in relation to the positions that the House and Senate had committed to the conference committee. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1479/
Conference Reports and Joint Explanatory Statements
The conference report presents the formal legislative language on which the conference committee has agreed. The joint explanatory statement explains the various elements of the conferees’ agreement in relation to the positions that the House and Senate had committed to the conference committee. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3963/
Floor Consideration of Conference Reports in the House
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs916/
Floor Consideration of Conference Reports in the House
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3977/
Floor Consideration of Conference Reports in the Senate
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3978/
The Department of State's Patterns of Global Terrorism Report: Trends, State Sponsors, and Related Issues
This report highlights trends and data found in the State Department’s annual Patterns of Global Terrorism report, (Patterns 2003) and addresses selected issues relating to its content. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5794/
China: Suspected Acquisition of U.S. Nuclear Weapon Secrets
This CRS Report discusses China’s suspected acquisition of U.S. nuclear weapon secrets, including that on the W88, the newest U.S. nuclear warhead, since the late 1970s. This current controversy, began in early 1999, raises policy issues about whether U.S. security is further threatened by the PRC’s suspected use of U.S. nuclear weapon secrets in its development of nuclear forces, as well as whether the Administration’s response to the security problems is effective or mishandled and whether it fairly used or abused its investigative and prosecuting authority. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1138/
The U.S. Population: A Factsheet
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs225/
Where to Get Publications from The Executive and Independent Agencies: A Directory of Sources for Official Documents
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs453/
Census 2000: The Sampling Debate
Plans by the Bureau of the Census to incorporate data from two new sample surveys into the 2000 decennial census count have had a mixed congressional reception. Three sampling bills in the 105th Congress (H.R. 1220, H.R. 1178, and H.R. 776) have been referred to committee, without further action. Sampling has been debated chiefly in the appropriations process (H.R. 1469, H.R. 1871 [P.L. 105-18; 111 Stat. 158], and H.R. 2267/S. 1022 [P.L. 105-119; 111 Stat. 2440]). The bureau now is a defendant in two anti-sampling suits brought under P.L. 105-119. The law also established a Census Monitoring Board and directed the bureau to prepare for a traditional headcount in 2000, not just to continue with its sampling plans. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs704/
Access to Government Information in the United States
The Constitution of the United States makes no specific allowance for any one of the co-equal branches to have access to information held by the others and contains no provision expressly establishing a procedure for, or a right of, public access to government information. Nonetheless, Congress has legislated various public access laws. These include two records access statutes—the Freedom of Information Act (5 U.S.C. 552) and the Privacy Act (5 U.S.C. 552a)—and two meetings access statutes—the Federal Advisory Committee Act (5 U.S.C. App.) and the Government in the Sunshine Act (5 U.S.C. 552b). Moreover, due to the American separation of powers model of government, interbranch conflicts over the accessibility of information are neither unexpected nor necessarily destructive. The federal courts, historically, have been reluctant to review and resolve “political questions” involving information disputes between Congress and the executive branch. Although there is considerable interbranch cooperation, such conflicts probably will continue to occur on occasion. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4982/
Access to Government Information in the United States
The Constitution of the United States makes no specific allowance for any one of the co-equal branches to have access to information held by the others and contains no provision expressly establishing a procedure for, or a right of, public access to government information. Nonetheless, Congress has legislated various public access laws. These include two records access statutes — the Freedom of Information Act (5 U.S.C. 552) and the Privacy Act (5 U.S.C. 552a) — and two meetings access statutes — the Federal Advisory Committee Act (5 U.S.C. App.) and the Government in the Sunshine Act (5 U.S.C. 552b). Moreover, due to the American separation of powers model of government, interbranch conflicts over the accessibility of information are neither unexpected nor necessarily destructive. The federal courts, historically, have been reluctant to review and resolve “political questions” involving information disputes between Congress and the executive branch. Although there is considerable interbranch cooperation, such conflicts probably will continue to occur on occasion. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6257/
Security Classification Policy and Procedure: E.O. 12958, as Amended
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6258/
Managing Secrecy: Security Classification Reform - The Government Secrecy Act Proposal
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs705/
Census 2000: Sampling as an Appropriations Issue in the 105th Congress
The 105th Congress has debated the decennial census sampling issue mainly in the appropriations process, beginning with FY1997 supplemental appropriations legislation for disaster relief. In FY1998 appropriations for Commerce, Justice, and State, the Judiciary, and Related Agencies (CJS), the Senate (S. 1022) instructed the Bureau of the Census not to make “irreversible” Census 2000 sampling plans, while the House (H.R. 2267) sought a moratorium on these plans, pending expedited judicial review of their constitutionality and legality. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs706/
Fax-on-Demand Services Available from Federal Government Agencies
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs707/
Fax-on-Demand Services Available from Federal Government Agencies
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3114/
Fax-on-Demand Services Available from Federal Government Agencies
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4983/
The Constitution of the United States, the Bill of Rights, and the Declaration of Independence: A Guide to Obtaining Copies
Copies of the Constitution of the United States and the Declaration of Independence are available from many sources, including the Internet. This report provides information on selected sources, both governmental and private, and is not intended to be all inclusive. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4984/
Public Printing Reform: Issues and Actions
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1803/
Public Printing Reform: Issues and Actions
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3115/
Public Printing Reform: Issues and Actions
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3116/
Public Printing Reform: Issues and Actions
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4985/
Public Printing Reform: Issues and Actions
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4986/
Executive and Independent Agency Publications: Where to Get Official Documents
This is a directory of telephone numbers and addresses that congressional offices may use to obtain publications from the Executive Office of the President, the executive departments, and the independent agencies and commissions of the federal government. Electronic sources are included for locating copies of government publications on the Internet. The information for each agency was provided by the agency itself. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1243/
Executive and Independent Agency Publications: Where to Get Official Documents
This is a directory of sources that congressional offices may use to obtain publications from the Executive Office of the President, the executive departments, and the independent agencies and commissions of the federal government. Also included is information on the Superintendent of Documents, the U.S. Government Printing Office, and the federal government’s printing policies; suggestions on what to do when a publication is out of print; and information on where copies of government publications may be obtained on the Internet. The information for each agency includes address, telephone number, fax number, and Internet e-mail address and Website, where available digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1805/
Executive and Independent Agency Publications: Where to Get Official Documents
This is a directory of telephone numbers and addresses that congressional offices may use to obtain publications from the Executive Office of the President, the executive departments, and the independent agencies and commissions of the federal government. Electronic sources are included for locating copies of government publications on the Internet. The information for each agency was provided by the agency itself. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3118/
Executive and Independent Agency Publications: Where to Get Official Documents
This is a directory of telephone numbers and addresses that congressional offices may use to obtain publications from the Executive Office of the President, the executive departments, and the independent agencies and commissions of the federal government. Electronic sources are included for locating copies of government publications on the Internet. The information for each agency was provided by the agency itself. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3119/
Executive and Independent Agency Publications: Where to Get Official Documents
This is a directory of telephone numbers and addresses that congressional offices may use to obtain publications from the Executive Office of the President, the executive departments, and the independent agencies and commissions of the federal government. Electronic sources are included for locating copies of government publications on the Internet. The information for each agency was provided by the agency itself. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3120/
Executive and Independent Agency Publications: Where to Get Official Documents
This is a directory of telephone numbers and addresses that congressional offices may use to obtain publications from the Executive Office of the President, the executive departments, and the independent agencies and commissions of the federal government. Electronic sources are included for locating copies of government publications on the Internet. The information for each agency was provided by the agency itself. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4988/
Federal Chief Information Officer (CIO): Opportunities and Challenges
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3117/
A Primer on E-Government: Sectors, Stages, Opportunities, and Challenges of Online Governance
Electronic government (e-government) intersects many legislative issues, including privacy, digital divide (the lack of equal access to computers, whether due to a lack of financial resources or necessary skills), public access to government information, service delivery, and information security. E-government solutions are prominently represented in efforts to improve the management and efficiency of government information technology resources. To help policymakers discern e-government initiatives relative to their role in various issues, this report identifies and defines the principal e-government sectors and stages of development. It also outlines some of the opportunities and challenges associated with e-government. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3121/
A Primer on E-Government: Sectors, Stages, Opportunities, and Challenges of Online Governance
Electronic government (e-government) intersects many legislative issues, including privacy, digital divide (the lack of equal access to computers, whether due to a lack of financial resources or necessary skills), public access to government information, service delivery, and information security. E-government solutions are prominently represented in efforts to improve the management and efficiency of government information technology resources. To help policymakers discern e-government initiatives relative to their role in various issues, this report identifies and defines the principal e-government sectors and stages of development. It also outlines some of the opportunities and challenges associated with e-government. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4987/
Sensitive Security Information and Transportation Security: Issues and Congressional Options
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5929/
The Information Quality Act: OMB's Guidance and Initial Implementation
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5930/
Protection of Classified Information by Congress: Practices and Proposals
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6259/
Iraq: Map Sources
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4989/
Iraq: Map Sources
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4990/
Iraq: Map Sources
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4991/
Iraq: Map Sources
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4992/
Sensitive Security Information (SSI) and Transportation Security: Background and Controversies
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5931/
Secrecy Versus Openness: New Proposed Arrangements for Balancing Competing Needs
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5932/
Secrecy Versus Openness: New Proposed Arrangements for Balancing Competing Needs
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5933/
The Protection of Classified Information: The Legal Framework
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5934/
Toxics Release Inventory: Do Communities Have a Right to Know More?
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs454/
Intelligence Identities Protection Act
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5060/
FIRST PREV 1 2 3 NEXT LAST