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 Decade: 2000-2009
 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
A Primer on E-Government: Sectors, Stages, Opportunities, and Challenges of Online Governance
Electronic government (e-government) intersects many legislative issues, including privacy, digital divide (the lack of equal access to computers, whether due to a lack of financial resources or necessary skills), public access to government information, service delivery, and information security. E-government solutions are prominently represented in efforts to improve the management and efficiency of government information technology resources. To help policymakers discern e-government initiatives relative to their role in various issues, this report identifies and defines the principal e-government sectors and stages of development. It also outlines some of the opportunities and challenges associated with e-government. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3121/
A Primer on E-Government: Sectors, Stages, Opportunities, and Challenges of Online Governance
Electronic government (e-government) intersects many legislative issues, including privacy, digital divide (the lack of equal access to computers, whether due to a lack of financial resources or necessary skills), public access to government information, service delivery, and information security. E-government solutions are prominently represented in efforts to improve the management and efficiency of government information technology resources. To help policymakers discern e-government initiatives relative to their role in various issues, this report identifies and defines the principal e-government sectors and stages of development. It also outlines some of the opportunities and challenges associated with e-government. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4987/
Access to Government Information in the United States
The Constitution of the United States makes no specific allowance for any one of the co-equal branches to have access to information held by the others and contains no provision expressly establishing a procedure for, or a right of, public access to government information. Nonetheless, Congress has legislated various public access laws. These include two records access statutes — the Freedom of Information Act (5 U.S.C. 552) and the Privacy Act (5 U.S.C. 552a) — and two meetings access statutes — the Federal Advisory Committee Act (5 U.S.C. App.) and the Government in the Sunshine Act (5 U.S.C. 552b). Moreover, due to the American separation of powers model of government, interbranch conflicts over the accessibility of information are neither unexpected nor necessarily destructive. The federal courts, historically, have been reluctant to review and resolve “political questions” involving information disputes between Congress and the executive branch. Although there is considerable interbranch cooperation, such conflicts probably will continue to occur on occasion. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6257/
Access to Government Information in the United States
The Constitution of the United States makes no specific allowance for any one of the co-equal branches to have access to information held by the others and contains no provision expressly establishing a procedure for, or a right of, public access to government information. Nonetheless, Congress has legislated various public access laws. These include two records access statutes—the Freedom of Information Act (5 U.S.C. 552) and the Privacy Act (5 U.S.C. 552a)—and two meetings access statutes—the Federal Advisory Committee Act (5 U.S.C. App.) and the Government in the Sunshine Act (5 U.S.C. 552b). Moreover, due to the American separation of powers model of government, interbranch conflicts over the accessibility of information are neither unexpected nor necessarily destructive. The federal courts, historically, have been reluctant to review and resolve “political questions” involving information disputes between Congress and the executive branch. Although there is considerable interbranch cooperation, such conflicts probably will continue to occur on occasion. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4982/
Executive and Independent Agency Publications: Where to Get Official Documents
This is a directory of telephone numbers and addresses that congressional offices may use to obtain publications from the Executive Office of the President, the executive departments, and the independent agencies and commissions of the federal government. Electronic sources are included for locating copies of government publications on the Internet. The information for each agency was provided by the agency itself. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4988/
Executive and Independent Agency Publications: Where to Get Official Documents
This is a directory of telephone numbers and addresses that congressional offices may use to obtain publications from the Executive Office of the President, the executive departments, and the independent agencies and commissions of the federal government. Electronic sources are included for locating copies of government publications on the Internet. The information for each agency was provided by the agency itself. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3120/
Executive and Independent Agency Publications: Where to Get Official Documents
This is a directory of telephone numbers and addresses that congressional offices may use to obtain publications from the Executive Office of the President, the executive departments, and the independent agencies and commissions of the federal government. Electronic sources are included for locating copies of government publications on the Internet. The information for each agency was provided by the agency itself. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3119/
Executive and Independent Agency Publications: Where to Get Official Documents
This is a directory of telephone numbers and addresses that congressional offices may use to obtain publications from the Executive Office of the President, the executive departments, and the independent agencies and commissions of the federal government. Electronic sources are included for locating copies of government publications on the Internet. The information for each agency was provided by the agency itself. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3118/
Executive and Independent Agency Publications: Where to Get Official Documents
This is a directory of sources that congressional offices may use to obtain publications from the Executive Office of the President, the executive departments, and the independent agencies and commissions of the federal government. Also included is information on the Superintendent of Documents, the U.S. Government Printing Office, and the federal government’s printing policies; suggestions on what to do when a publication is out of print; and information on where copies of government publications may be obtained on the Internet. The information for each agency includes address, telephone number, fax number, and Internet e-mail address and Website, where available digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1805/
Executive and Independent Agency Publications: Where to Get Official Documents
This is a directory of telephone numbers and addresses that congressional offices may use to obtain publications from the Executive Office of the President, the executive departments, and the independent agencies and commissions of the federal government. Electronic sources are included for locating copies of government publications on the Internet. The information for each agency was provided by the agency itself. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1243/
The Constitution of the United States, the Bill of Rights, and the Declaration of Independence: A Guide to Obtaining Copies
Copies of the Constitution of the United States and the Declaration of Independence are available from many sources, including the Internet. This report provides information on selected sources, both governmental and private, and is not intended to be all inclusive. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4984/
Fax-on-Demand Services Available from Federal Government Agencies
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4983/
Fax-on-Demand Services Available from Federal Government Agencies
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3114/
The Information Quality Act: OMB's Guidance and Initial Implementation
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5930/
Critical Infrastructure Information Disclosure and Homeland Security
This report discusses the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) that was passed to ensure by statute citizen access to government information. Nine categories of information may be exempted from disclosure. Three of the nine exemptions provide possible protection against the release of critical infrastructure information: exemption 1 (national security information); exemption 3 (information exempted by statute); and exemption 4 (confidential business information). Congress has considered several proposals to exempt critical infrastructure information from the FOIA. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2244/
Critical Infrastructure Information Disclosure and Homeland Security
This report discusses the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) that was passed to ensure by statute citizen access to government information. Nine categories of information may be exempted from disclosure. Three of the nine exemptions provide possible protection against the release of critical infrastructure information: exemption 1 (national security information); exemption 3 (information exempted by statute); and exemption 4 (confidential business information). Congress has considered several proposals to exempt critical infrastructure information from the FOIA. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3914/
Federal Chief Information Officer (CIO): Opportunities and Challenges
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3117/
Public Printing Reform: Issues and Actions
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4986/
Public Printing Reform: Issues and Actions
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4985/
Public Printing Reform: Issues and Actions
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3116/
Public Printing Reform: Issues and Actions
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3115/
Public Printing Reform: Issues and Actions
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1803/
Iraq: Map Sources
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4992/
Iraq: Map Sources
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4991/
Iraq: Map Sources
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4990/
Iraq: Map Sources
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4989/
Iraq: Map Sources
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs9709/
The Federal Funding Accountability and Transparency Act (S. 2590): Overview and Comparison with H.R. 5060
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs9523/
Federal Rulemaking: The Role of the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs
This report discusses the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1980, which created the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA) within the Office of Management and Budget (OMB). This report addresses OIRA's responsibilities, controversies related to OIRA, and possible legislative issues involving OIRA, including increasing or decreasing the office's funding and staffing, and improvements in the transparency of OIRA's review process. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc26217/
Iraq: Map Sources
This report identifies selected websites for maps of Iraq, including government, library, and organizational websites. Maps of the Middle East, Iraq, facilities used by U.S. forces in the Gulf, and U.S. government humanitarian assistance and reconstruction activities in Iraq are also provided. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs10253/
FY2005 Budget Documents: Internet Access and GPO Availability
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs8197/
U.S. Merchandise Trade Statistics: 1948-2001
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3512/
U.S. Merchandise Trade Statistics: 1948-2000
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1993/
U.S. Merchandise Trade Data: 1948-2002
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5546/
U.S. Merchandise Trade Data: 1948-2002
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3511/
Access to Government Information in the United States
The U.S. Constitution makes no specific allowance for any one of the three branches of the federal government to have access to information held by the others. No provision in the U.S. Constitution expressly establishes a procedure for public access to government information. Congress has legislated various public access laws. Among these laws are two records access statutes, The Freedom of Information Act, the Privacy Act, and two meetings access statutes, the Federal Advisory Committee Act, and the Government in the Sunshine Act. This report offers an overview of the four information access laws noted above, and provides citations to additional resources related to these tools. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc29513/
Secrecy Versus Openness: New Proposed Arrangements for Balancing Competing Needs
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5933/
Secrecy Versus Openness: New Proposed Arrangements for Balancing Competing Needs
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5932/
Sensitive Security Information (SSI) and Transportation Security: Background and Controversies
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5931/
Sensitive Security Information and Transportation Security: Issues and Congressional Options
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5929/
Appropriations Bills: What is Report Language?
When the Senate or House Appropriations Committee reports an appropriations bill to the full Senate or House, respectively, the committee typically publishes a committee report explaining the bill. This fact sheet provides a brief overview of what these reports entail and the language used within them. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7624/
Security Classification Policy and Procedure: E.O. 12958, as Amended
This report describes security classification policy and procedure, largely prescribed in a series of successive presidential executive orders issued over the past 50 years. This policy provides the rationale and arrangements for designating information officially secret for reasons of national security, and for its declassification as well. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc29519/
Security Classification Policy and Procedure: E.O. 12958, as Amended
This report describes security classification policy and procedure, largely prescribed in a series of successive presidential executive orders issued over the past 50 years. This policy provides the rationale and arrangements for designating information officially secret for reasons of national security, and for its declassification as well. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc29518/
"Gang of Four" Congressional Intelligence Notifications
"Gang of Four" intelligence notifications generally are oral briefings of certain particularly sensitive non-covert action intelligence activities, including principally, but not exclusively, intelligence collection programs, that the Intelligence Community typically limits to the chairmen and ranking members of the two congressional intelligence committees, and at times, but not always, to their respective staff directors. This report reviews the history of Gang of Four notification process and compares this procedure with that of the "Gang of Eight" notification procedure. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc26184/
Security Classification Policy and Procedure: E.O. 12958, as Amended
This report describes security classification policy and procedure, largely prescribed in a series of successive presidential executive orders issued over the past 50 years. This policy provides the rationale and arrangements for designating information officially secret for reasons of national security, and for its declassification as well. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc29520/
Conference Reports and Joint Explanatory Statements
The conference report presents the formal legislative language on which the conference committee has agreed. The joint explanatory statement explains the various elements of the conferees’ agreement in relation to the positions that the House and Senate had committed to the conference committee. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3963/
Conference Reports and Joint Explanatory Statements
The conference report presents the formal legislative language on which the conference committee has agreed. The joint explanatory statement explains the various elements of the conferees’ agreement in relation to the positions that the House and Senate had committed to the conference committee. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1479/
The Changing Demographic Profile of the United States
As noted by the Population Reference Bureau, “The U.S. is getting bigger, older, and more diverse.” The objective of this report is to highlight some of the demographic changes that have already occurred since 1950 and to illustrate how these and future trends will reshape the nation in the decades to come (through 2050). This report discusses the current and projected demographic changes if policymakers accelerate efforts to address and adapt to the changing population profile as it relates to a number of essential domains, such as work, retirement, and pensions, private wealth and income security, and the health and well-being of the aging population. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs9276/
Intelligence Identities Protection Act
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5060/
Security Classification Policy and Procedure: E.O. 12958, as Amended
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6258/
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