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 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
Syria: U.S. Relations and Bilateral Issues

Syria: U.S. Relations and Bilateral Issues

Date: September 14, 2006
Creator: Prados, Alfred B.
Description: An array of bilateral issues continues to affect relations between the United States and Syria: the course of Arab-Israeli talks; questions of arms proliferation; Syrian connections with terrorist activity; Syria's role in Lebanon; and Syria's opposition to the U.S. occupation in Iraq. U.S. officials and Members of Congress have blamed Syria for helping transfer rockets and other arms to Hezbollah units. This report outlines the current political situation in Syria, as well as Syria's political relationship with the United States and related legislation.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Syria: U.S. Relations and Bilateral Issues

Syria: U.S. Relations and Bilateral Issues

Date: July 27, 2006
Creator: Prados, Alfred B.
Description: An array of bilateral issues continue to affect relations between the United States and Syria: the course of Arab-Israeli talks; questions of arms proliferation; Syrian connections with terrorist activity; Syria's role in Lebanon; and Syria's opposition to the U.S. occupation in Iraq. A variety of U.S. legislative provisions and executive directives prohibit direct aid to Syria and restrict bilateral trade relations between the two countries, due largely to Syria's designation by the U.S. State Department as a sponsor of international terrorism. This report outlines in detail U.S.-Syrian relations, including discussion of the assassination of former Lebanese Prime Minister Rafiq Hariri, the outbreak of Hezballah-related violence, and related legislation.
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Israel: Background and Relations with the United States

Israel: Background and Relations with the United States

Date: September 21, 2006
Creator: Migdalovitz, Carol
Description: Armed conflict has marked every decade of Israel's existence. Despite its unstable regional environment, Israel has developed a vibrant parliamentary democracy, albeit with relatively fragile governments. Israel has an advanced industrial, market economy in which the government plays a substantial role. Israel's foreign policy is focused largely on its region, Europe, and the United States. Since 1948, the United States and Israel have developed a close friendship based on common democratic values, religious affinities, and security interests. The two countries have close security relations. Other issues in U.S.-Israeli relations include Israel's military sales to China, inadequate Israeli protection of U.S. intellectual property, and espionage-related cases.
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Israel: Background and Relations with the United States

Israel: Background and Relations with the United States

Date: July 26, 2006
Creator: Migdalovitz, Carol
Description: On May 14, 1948, the State of Israel declared its independence and was immediately engaged in a war with all of its neighbors. Despite the fact that armed conflict has marked every decade of Israel's existence, Israel has developed a vibrant parliamentary democracy and an advanced industrial, market economy. Since 1948, the United States and Israel have developed a close friendship based on common democratic values, religious affinities, and security interests. This report outlines the current state of Israeli government and economy, as well as general relations between the U.S. and Israel.
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Israel: Background and Relations with the United States

Israel: Background and Relations with the United States

Date: June 14, 2006
Creator: Migdalovitz, Carol
Description: Armed conflict has marked every decade of Israel's existence. Despite its unstable regional environment, Israel has developed a vibrant parliamentary democracy, albeit with relatively fragile governments. Israel has an advanced industrial, market economy in which the government plays a substantial role. The economy is now doing very well, and increased social spending is expected. Israel's foreign policy is focused largely on its region, Europe, and the United States. European countries collectively are Israel's second largest trading partner, and the EU participates in the peace process. Since 1948, the United States and Israel have developed a close friendship based on common democratic values, religious affinities, and security interests. Current issues in U.S.-Israeli relations include Israel's military sales to China, inadequate Israeli protection of U.S. intellectual property, and espionage-related cases.
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Israel: Background and Relations with the United States

Israel: Background and Relations with the United States

Date: August 31, 2006
Creator: Migdalovitz, Carol
Description: On May 14, 1948, the State of Israel declared its independence and was immediately engaged in a war with all of its neighbors. Despite the fact that armed conflict has marked every decade of Israel's existence, Israel has developed a vibrant parliamentary democracy and an advanced industrial, market economy. Since 1948, the United States and Israel have developed a close friendship based on common democratic values, religious affinities, and security interests. This report outlines the current state of Israeli government and economy, as well as general relations between the U.S. and Israel.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Central Asia: Regional Developments and Implications for U.S. Interests

Central Asia: Regional Developments and Implications for U.S. Interests

Date: June 5, 2006
Creator: Nichol, Jim
Description: After the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, the United States recognized the independence of all the former Central Asian republics, supported their admission into Western organizations, and elicited Turkish support to counter Iranian influence in the region. Soon after the terrorist attacks on America on September 11, 2001, all the Central Asia states offered overflight and other support to coalition anti-terrorist efforts in Afghanistan. After September 11, 2001, U.S. policy emphasized bolstering the security of the Central Asian states to help them combat terrorism, proliferation, and arms trafficking. Other U.S. objectives include promoting democratization, free markets, human rights, and energy development, as well as integrating these states into the international community.
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Central Asia: Regional Developments and Implications for U.S. Interests

Central Asia: Regional Developments and Implications for U.S. Interests

Date: June 29, 2006
Creator: Nichol, Jim
Description: After the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, the United States recognized the independence of all the former Central Asian republics, supported their admission into Western organizations, and elicited Turkish support to counter Iranian influence in the region. The Administration's diverse goals in Central Asia reflect the different characteristics of these states. U.S. interests in Kazakhstan include securing and eliminating Soviet-era nuclear and biological weapons materials and facilities. In Tajikistan, U.S. aid focuses on economic reconstruction. U.S. energy firms have invested in oil and natural gas development in Kazakhstan and Turkmenistan. This report outlines the above, as well as several ongoing debates regarding general relations between the U.S. and Central Asia.
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Central Asia: Regional Developments and Implications for U.S. Interests

Central Asia: Regional Developments and Implications for U.S. Interests

Date: August 4, 2006
Creator: Nichol, Jim
Description: After the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, the United States recognized the independence of all the former Central Asian republics, supported their admission into Western organizations, and elicited Turkish support to counter Iranian influence in the region. The Administration's diverse goals in Central Asia reflect the different characteristics of these states. U.S. interests in Kazakhstan include securing and eliminating Soviet-era nuclear and biological weapons materials and facilities. In Tajikistan, U.S. aid focuses on economic reconstruction. U.S. energy firms have invested in oil and natural gas development in Kazakhstan and Turkmenistan. This report outlines the above, as well as several ongoing debates regarding general relations between the U.S. and Central Asia.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Japan-U.S. Relations: Issues for Congress

Japan-U.S. Relations: Issues for Congress

Date: June 30, 2006
Creator: Chanlett-Avery, Emma; Manyin, Mark E. & Cooper, William H.
Description: The post-World War II U.S.-Japan alliance has long been an anchor of the U.S. security role in East Asia. The alliance, with its access to bases in Japan, where about 53,000 U.S. troops are stationed, facilitates the forward deployment of U.S. military forces in the Asia-Pacific, thereby undergirding U.S. national security strategy. For Japan, the alliance and the U.S. nuclear umbrella provide maneuvering room in dealing with its neighbors, particularly China and North Korea. The Bush Administration has made significant strides in its goals of broadening U.S.-Japan strategic cooperation and encouraging Japan to assume a more active international role. Most of these developments have been viewed warily by South Korea and opposed outright by China. Japan is one of the United States' most important economic partners. Outside of North America, it is the United States' largest export market and second-largest source of imports.
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Japan-U.S. Relations

Japan-U.S. Relations

Date: August 7, 2006
Creator: Chanlett-Avery, Emma; Manyin, Mark E. & Cooper, William H.
Description: The post-World War II U.S.-Japan alliance has long been an anchor of the U.S. security role in East Asia. The alliance facilitates, for the U.S., the forward deployment of U.S. military forces in the Asia-Pacific, and provides, for Japan, maneuvering room in dealing with its neighbors, particularly China and North Korea. This report outlines and explains in detail several aspects of the developing U.S.-Japan relationship. Most of said developing relationship has been viewed warily by South Korea and China. Japan is one of the United States' most important economic partners. It is the United States' largest export market outside of North America and second-largest source of imports. This report also describes in detail the economic relationship between the U.S. and Japan.
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Libya: Background and U.S. Relations

Libya: Background and U.S. Relations

Date: June 13, 2006
Creator: Blanchard, Christopher M.
Description: On May 15, 2006, the Bush Administration announced its intention to restore full diplomatic relations with Libya and to rescind Libya's listing as a state sponsor of terrorism and a country not fully cooperating with U.S. counterterrorism efforts. The announcements mark the culmination of a period of improvement and rapprochement in U.S.-Libyan relations that begin in December 2003. Observers expect that these changes will usher in a new era in the U.S.-Libyan relationship, which has been strained and hostile for much of the last 35 years. This report provides background information on Libya and U.S.-Libyan relations; profile Libyan leader Muammar Al Qadhafi; discusses Libya's political and economic reform efforts; and reviews current issues of potential congressional interest.
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U.S. Nuclear Cooperation with India: Issues for Congress

U.S. Nuclear Cooperation with India: Issues for Congress

Date: June 27, 2006
Creator: Squassoni, Sharon
Description: On July 18, 2005, President Bush announced he would "work to achieve full civil nuclear energy cooperation with India" and would "also seek agreement from Congress to adjust U.S. laws and policies," in the context of a broader, global partnership with India to promote stability, democracy, prosperity and peace. Administration officials have promoted nuclear cooperation with India as a way to reduce India's carbon dioxide emissions and its dependence on oil, bring India into the "nonproliferation mainstream" and create jobs for U.S. industry. Nonproliferation experts have suggested that potential costs to U.S. and global nonproliferation policy of nuclear cooperation with India may far exceed the benefits.
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Egypt: Background and U.S. Relations

Egypt: Background and U.S. Relations

Date: June 14, 2006
Creator: Sharp, Jeremy M.
Description: This report provides an overview of Egyptian politics and current issues in U.S.-Egyptian relations. It briefly provides a political history of modern Egypt, an overview of its political institutions, and a discussion of the prospects for democratization in Egypt. U.S.-Egyptian relations are complex and multi-faceted, and this report addresses the following current topics: the Arab-Israeli peace process, Iraq, terrorism, democratization and reform, human rights, trade, and military cooperation. For more information on Egypt, see CRS Report RS22274, Egypt: 2005 Presidential and Parliamentary Elections.
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U.S. Nuclear Cooperation with India: Issues for Congress

U.S. Nuclear Cooperation with India: Issues for Congress

Date: July 21, 2006
Creator: Squassoni, Sharon
Description: On July 18, 2005, President Bush announced he would "work to achieve full civil nuclear energy cooperation with India" and would "also seek agreement from Congress to adjust U.S. laws and policies," in the context of a broader, global partnership with India to promote stability, democracy, prosperity and peace. Administration officials have promoted nuclear cooperation with India as a way to reduce India's carbon dioxide emissions and its dependence on oil, bring India into the "nonproliferation mainstream" and create jobs for U.S. industry. Nonproliferation experts have suggested that potential costs to U.S. and global nonproliferation policy of nuclear cooperation with India may far exceed the benefits.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Egypt: Background and U.S. Relations

Egypt: Background and U.S. Relations

Date: October 4, 2006
Creator: Sharp, Jeremy M.
Description: This report provides an overview of Egyptian politics and current issues in U.S.-Egyptian relations. It briefly provides a political history of modern Egypt, an overview of its political institutions, and a discussion of the prospects for democratization in Egypt, U.S.-Egyptian relations are complex and multi-faceted, and this report addresses the following current topics: the Arab-Israeli peace process, Iraq, terrorism, democratization and reform, human rights, trade, and military cooperation.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Egypt: Background and U.S. Relations

Egypt: Background and U.S. Relations

Date: July 26, 2006
Creator: Sharp, Jeremy M.
Description: This report provides an overview of Egyptian politics and current issues in U.S.-Egyptian relations. It briefly provides a political history of modern Egypt, an overview of its political institutions, and a discussion of the prospects for democratization in Egypt, U.S.-Egyptian relations are complex and multi-faceted, and this report addresses the following current topics: the Arab-Israeli peace process, Iraq, terrorism, democratization and reform, human rights, trade, and military cooperation.
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U.S.-China Counterterrorism Cooperation: Issues for U.S. Policy

U.S.-China Counterterrorism Cooperation: Issues for U.S. Policy

Date: June 27, 2006
Creator: Kan, Shirley A.
Description: After the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001, the United States faced a challenge in enlisting the full support of the People's Republic of China (PRC) in counterterrorism. This effort raised short-term policy issues about how to elicit cooperation and how to address China's concerns about military action (Operation Enduring Freedom). Longer-term questions have concerned whether counterterrorism has strategically transformed bilateral relations and whether China's support has been valuable and not obtained at the expense of other U.S. interests.
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Peacekeeping and Conflict Transitions: Background and Congressional Action on Civilian Capabilities

Peacekeeping and Conflict Transitions: Background and Congressional Action on Civilian Capabilities

Date: September 18, 2006
Creator: Serafino, Nina M.
Description: The State Department's new Office of the Coordinator for Reconstruction and Stabilization (S/CRS) is intended to address longstanding concerns, both within Congress and the broader foreign policy community, over the perceived lack of the appropriate capabilities and processes to deal with transitions from conflict to sustainable stability. Effectively distributing resources among the various executive branch actors, maintaining clear lines of authority and jurisdiction, and balancing short- and long-term objectives are major challenges for designing, planning, and conducting post-conflict operations. This report outlines the functions of S/CRS, as well as funding of S/CRS and relevant legislation.
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China-U.S. Relations: Current Issues and Implications for U.S. Policy

China-U.S. Relations: Current Issues and Implications for U.S. Policy

Date: June 8, 2006
Creator: Dumbaugh, Kerry
Description: Throughout much of the George W. Bush Administration, U.S.-China relations have remained unusually smooth and stable. But U.S. policy toward China now appears to be subject to competing reassessments. State Department officials late in 2005 unveiled what they described as a new policy framework for the relationship -- one in which the United States was willing to work cooperatively with a non-democratic China while encouraging Beijing to become a "responsible stakeholder" in the global system. Other U.S. policymakers appear to be adopting somewhat tougher stances on issues involving China and U.S.-China relations, expressing their concerns about strong PRC economic growth and a more assertive and influential PRC diplomacy in the international arena.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
China-U.S. Relations: Current Issues and Implications for U.S. Policy

China-U.S. Relations: Current Issues and Implications for U.S. Policy

Date: July 14, 2006
Creator: Dumbaugh, Kerry
Description: Throughout much of the George W. Bush Administration, U.S.-China relations have remained unusually smooth and stable. But U.S. policy toward China now appears to be subject to competing reassessments. While some U.S. policymakers appear to be willing to work cooperatively with a non-democratic China, others appear to be adopting somewhat tougher stances on issues involving China and U.S.-China relations, expressing their concerns about strong PRC economic growth and a more assertive and influential PRC diplomacy in the international arena. Another matter of growing U.S. concern is China's increasing global "reach" and the consequences that PRC expanding economic and political influence have for U.S. interests. Much of current concern about China appears driven by security calculations at the Pentagon and in Congress.
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China-U.S. Relations: Current Issues and Implications for U.S. Policy

China-U.S. Relations: Current Issues and Implications for U.S. Policy

Date: September 22, 2006
Creator: Dumbaugh, Kerry
Description: Throughout much of the George W. Bush Administration, U.S.-China relations have remained unusually smooth and stable. But U.S. policy toward China now appears to be subject to competing reassessments. State Department officials late in 2005 unveiled what they described as a new policy framework for the relationship -- one in which the United States was willing to work cooperatively with a non-democratic China while encouraging Beijing to become a "responsible stakeholder" in the global system. Other U.S. policymakers appear to be adopting somewhat tougher stances on issues involving China and U.S.-China relations, expressing their concerns about strong PRC economic growth and a more assertive and influential PRC diplomacy in the international arena.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Mexico-United States Dialogue on Migration and Border Issues, 2001-2006

Mexico-United States Dialogue on Migration and Border Issues, 2001-2006

Date: February 16, 2006
Creator: Cook, Colleen W.
Description: This report, which will be updated periodically, focuses on the interactions between Mexico and the United States on migration and border issues during the administrations of President George W. Bush and President Vicente Fox of Mexico. These interactions are increasingly tense in 2006 due to violence in the border region and debate over U.S. immigration reform. The discussions and agreements fall into four areas: (1) the bilateral migration talks, (2) the Partnership for Prosperity, (3) the Border Partnership Agreement, and (4) the trilateral "Security and Prosperity Partnership (SPP) of North America."
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Latin America and the Caribbean: Issues for the 109th Congress

Latin America and the Caribbean: Issues for the 109th Congress

Date: September 12, 2006
Creator: Sullivan, Mark P.; Cook, Colleen W.; Hornbeck, J. F.; Ribando, Clare M.; Taft-Morales, Maureen; Veillette, Connie et al.
Description: Over the past two decades, the Latin America and Caribbean region has made enormous strides in terms of political and economic development. Legislative and oversight attention to Latin America and the Caribbean in the 109th Congress has focused on continued counternarcotics efforts; trade issues; challenges to democracy, especially in Venezuela; efforts to bring political stability and ameliorate poverty in Haiti; efforts to foster political change in Cuba; and cooperation on migration and border security, especially with Mexico. This report provides an overview of U.S. relations with Latin America and the Caribbean, focusing on the role of Congress and congressional concerns.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department