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 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
Results 2421 - 2444 of 4,103
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Cuba: U.S. Restrictions on Travel and Remittances

Cuba: U.S. Restrictions on Travel and Remittances

Date: August 30, 2006
Creator: Sullivan, Mark P.
Description: Restrictions on travel to Cuba have been a key and often contentious component in U.S. efforts to isolate the communist government of Fidel Castro for much of the past 40 years. Under the Bush Administration, enforcement of U.S. restrictions on Cuba travel has increased, and restrictions on travel and on private remittances to Cuba have been tightened. Several legislative initiatives have been introduced in the 109th Congress that would ease restrictions on travel and remittances to Cuba. These bills would, among other things, lift overall restrictions on travel to Cuba, lift the overall embargo, and ease restrictions on exporting agricultural commodities to Cuba.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Iraq: Post-Saddam Governance and Security

Iraq: Post-Saddam Governance and Security

Date: August 30, 2006
Creator: Katzman, Kenneth
Description: Operation Iraqi Freedom succeeded in overthrowing Saddam Hussein, but Iraq remains unstable because of Sunni Arab resentment and a related insurgency, now compounded by Sunni-Shiite violence that some believe is a civil war. According to its November 30, 2005, "Strategy for Victory," the Bush Administration indicates that U.S. forces will remain in Iraq until the country is able to provide for its own security. Mounting U.S. casualties and financial costs -- without clear signs of security progress -- have intensified a debate within the United States over the wisdom of the invasion and whether to wind down U.S. involvement without completely accomplishing U.S. goals.
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Iraq: Post-Saddam Governance and Security

Iraq: Post-Saddam Governance and Security

Date: August 30, 2006
Creator: Katzman, Kenneth
Description: Operation Iraqi Freedom succeeded in overthrowing Saddam Hussein, but Iraq remains unstable because of Sunni Arab resentment and a related insurgency, now compounded by Sunni-Shiite violence that some believe is a civil war. This report discusses the background of the issue and examines several security challenges, response, and other policy options for the U.S.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Iraq: Post-Saddam Governance and Security

Iraq: Post-Saddam Governance and Security

Date: August 30, 2006
Creator: Katzman, Kenneth
Description: Operation Iraqi Freedom succeeded in overthrowing Saddam Hussein, but Iraq remains unstable because of Sunni Arab resentment and a related insurgency, now compounded by Sunni-Shiite violence that some believe is a civil war. According to its November 30, 2005, “Strategy for Victory,” the Bush Administration indicates that U.S. forces will remain in Iraq until the country is able to provide for its own security. This report discusses security challenges, responses, and policy options.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
U.S.-Japan Economic Relations: Significance, Prospects, and Policy Options

U.S.-Japan Economic Relations: Significance, Prospects, and Policy Options

Date: August 30, 2006
Creator: Cooper, William H
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Bolivia: Political and Economic Developments and Relations with the United States

Bolivia: Political and Economic Developments and Relations with the United States

Date: August 29, 2006
Creator: Ribando, Clare
Description: This report includes background information on Bolivia’s political unrest, economic situation, and relations with the United States. In the past few years, Bolivia has experienced extreme political unrest resulting in the country having six presidents since 2001. Under policies of recently-elected leftist-leaning President Evo Morales, Bolivia's relations with neighboring countries, foreign investors, and the United States have been complicated. For some 20 years, U.S. interest in Bolivia has centered on its role as a coca producer and its relationship to Colombia and Peru, the two other major coca- and cocaine-producing countries in the Andes. U.S.-Bolivian relations have become tense in 2006 in the wake of the Morales government's questionable commitment to combating illegal drugs, increasing ties with Venezuela and Cuba, and the nationalization measure.
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Bolivia: Political and Economic Developments and Relations with the United States

Bolivia: Political and Economic Developments and Relations with the United States

Date: August 29, 2006
Creator: Ribando, Clare
Description: This report includes background information on Bolivia’s political unrest, economic situation, and relations with the United States. In the past few years, Bolivia has experienced extreme political unrest resulting in the country having six presidents since 2001. Under policies of recently-elected leftist-leaning President Evo Morales, Bolivia's relations with neighboring countries, foreign investors, and the United States have been complicated. For some 20 years, U.S. interest in Bolivia has centered on its role as a coca producer and its relationship to Colombia and Peru, the two other major coca- and cocaine-producing countries in the Andes. U.S.-Bolivian relations have become tense in 2006 in the wake of the Morales government's questionable commitment to combating illegal drugs, increasing ties with Venezuela and Cuba, and the nationalization measure.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
China Naval Modernization: Implications for U.S. Navy Capabilities - Background and Issues for Congress

China Naval Modernization: Implications for U.S. Navy Capabilities - Background and Issues for Congress

Date: August 29, 2006
Creator: O'Rourke, Ronald
Description: This report focuses on the implications that certain elements of China’s military modernization may have for future required U.S. Navy capabilities. The issue for Congress addressed in this report is: How should China’s military modernization be factored into decisions about U.S. Navy programs? Congress’s decisions on this issue could significantly affect future U.S. Navy capabilities, U.S. Navy funding requirements, and the U.S. defense industrial base, including the shipbuilding industry.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Democracy in Russia: Trends and Implications for U.S. Interests

Democracy in Russia: Trends and Implications for U.S. Interests

Date: August 29, 2006
Creator: Nichol, Jim
Description: U.S. attention has focused on Russia's fitful democratization since Russia emerged in 1991 from the collapse of the Soviet Union. Many observers have argued that a democratic Russia with free markets would be a cooperative bilateral and multilateral partner rather than an insular and hostile national security threat. President Putin's 2004 proposal to restructure the government has been supported by international observers. The U.S. Administration and Congress have welcomed some cooperation with Russia on vital U.S. national security concerns, including the non-proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, among other issues.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Democracy in Russia: Trends and Implications for U.S. Interests

Democracy in Russia: Trends and Implications for U.S. Interests

Date: August 29, 2006
Creator: Nichol, Jim
Description: U.S. attention has focused on Russia's fitful democratization since Russia emerged in 1991 from the collapse of the Soviet Union. Many observers have argued that a democratic Russia with free markets would be a cooperative bilateral and multilateral partner rather than an insular and hostile national security threat. President Putin's 2004 proposal to restructure the government has been supported by international observers. The U.S. Administration and Congress have welcomed some cooperation with Russia on vital U.S. national security concerns, including the non-proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, among other issues.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Democracy in Russia: Trends and Implications for U.S. Interests

Democracy in Russia: Trends and Implications for U.S. Interests

Date: August 29, 2006
Creator: Nichol, Jim
Description: U.S. attention has focused on Russia's fitful democratization since Russia emerged in 1991 from the collapse of the Soviet Union. Many observers have argued that a democratic Russia with free markets would be a cooperative bilateral and multilateral partner rather than an insular and hostile national security threat. President Putin's 2004 proposal to restructure the government has been supported by international observers. The U.S. Administration and Congress have welcomed some cooperation with Russia on vital U.S. national security concerns, including the non-proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, among other issues.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Iran: U.S. Concerns and Policy Options

Iran: U.S. Concerns and Policy Options

Date: August 25, 2006
Creator: Katzman, Kenneth
Description: This report discusses issues for Congress regarding foreign policy toward Iran. According to the Administration’s “National Security Strategy” document released on March 16, 2006, the United States “may face no greater challenge from a single country than Iran.”
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Iran: U.S. Concerns and Policy Options

Iran: U.S. Concerns and Policy Options

Date: August 25, 2006
Creator: Katzman, Kenneth
Description: This report discusses the debate over U.S. policy toward Iran, much of which has centered on the nature of the current regime. Some experts believe that Iran, a country of almost 70 million people, is a threat to U.S. interests because hardliners in Iran’s regime dominate and set a policy direction intended to challenge U.S. influence and allies in the region. President Bush, in his January 29, 2002, State of the Union message, labeled Iran part of an “axis of evil” along with Iraq and North Korea.
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Iran: U.S. Concerns and Policy Responses

Iran: U.S. Concerns and Policy Responses

Date: August 25, 2006
Creator: Katzman, Kenneth
Description: According to an Administration national security strategy document released on March 16, 2006, the United States "may face no greater challenge from a single country than Iran." The Bush Administration announced May 31, 2006, that it would negotiate with Iran in concert with U.S. allies. If diplomacy and sanctions do not succeed, some advocate military action against Iran's nuclear infrastructure rather than acquiescence to a nuclear-armed Iran. U.S. concerns regarding Iran include Iran's nuclear program, Iran's influence on Iraq by way of providing arms and other material assistance to Shiite Islamist militias, and Iran's human rights practices, which include strict limits on free expression and repression of ethnic and religious minorities.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Legal Developments in International Civil Aviation

Legal Developments in International Civil Aviation

Date: August 25, 2006
Creator: Tatelman, Todd B
Description: This report provides background on U.S. civil aviation agreements, updates the current status of U.S. “Open Skies” negotiations with the EU, and addresses the status of the legal debate concerning both the foreign ownership and control rules and the cabotage laws.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Afghanistan: Post-War Governance, Security, and U.S. Policy

Afghanistan: Post-War Governance, Security, and U.S. Policy

Date: August 23, 2006
Creator: Katzman, Kenneth
Description: The United States and its allies are helping Afghanistan emerging from more than 22 years of warfare, although substantial risk to Afghan stability remains. Before the U.S. military campaign against the orthodox Islamist Taliban movement began on October 7, 2001, Afghanistan had been mired in conflict since the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan in 1979. The defeat of the Taliban has enabled the United States and its coalition partners to send forces throughout Afghanistan to search for Taliban and Al Qaeda fighters and leaders that remain at large, including Osama bin Laden. As the war against remaining Al Qaeda and Taliban elements winds down, the United States is shifting its military focus toward stabilizing the interim government, including training a new Afghan national army, and supporting the international security force (ISAF) that is helping the new government provide security.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Afghanistan: Post-War Governance, Security, and U.S. Policy

Afghanistan: Post-War Governance, Security, and U.S. Policy

Date: August 23, 2006
Creator: Katzman, Kenneth
Description: The United States and its allies are helping Afghanistan emerging from more than 22 years of warfare, although substantial risk to Afghan stability remains. Before the U.S. military campaign against the orthodox Islamist Taliban movement began on October 7, 2001, Afghanistan had been mired in conflict since the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan in 1979. The defeat of the Taliban has enabled the United States and its coalition partners to send forces throughout Afghanistan to search for Taliban and Al Qaeda fighters and leaders that remain at large, including Osama bin Laden. As the war against remaining Al Qaeda and Taliban elements winds down, the United States is shifting its military focus toward stabilizing the interim government, including training a new Afghan national army, and supporting the international security force (ISAF) that is helping the new government provide security.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Afghanistan: Post-War Governance, Security, and U.S. Policy

Afghanistan: Post-War Governance, Security, and U.S. Policy

Date: August 23, 2006
Creator: Katzman, Kenneth
Description: Afghanistan's political transition was completed with the convening of a parliament in December 2005, but since then insurgent threats to Afghanistan's government have escalated to the point that some experts are questioning the future of U.S. stabilization efforts. Afghan citizens are enjoying new personal freedoms that were forbidden under the Taliban. Women are participating in economic and political life. U.S. stabilization measures focus on strengthening the central government and its security forces and on promoting reconstructing while combating the renewed insurgent challenge.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Cuba After Fidel Castro: U.S. Policy Implications and Approaches

Cuba After Fidel Castro: U.S. Policy Implications and Approaches

Date: August 23, 2006
Creator: Sullivan, Mark P
Description: In the new context of Fidel’s transfer of power, there are two broad policy approaches to contend with political change in Cuba: a stay-the-course or status-quo approach that would maintain the U.S. dual-track policy of isolating the Cuban government while providing support to the Cuban people; and an approach aimed at influencing the Cuban government and Cuban society through increased contact and engagement.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Ukraine: Current Issues and U.S. Policy

Ukraine: Current Issues and U.S. Policy

Date: August 23, 2006
Creator: Woehrel, Steven
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Persian Gulf States: Issues for U.S. Policy, 2006

The Persian Gulf States: Issues for U.S. Policy, 2006

Date: August 21, 2006
Creator: Katzman, Kenneth
Description: The U.S.-led war to overthrow Saddam Hussein virtually ended Iraq's ability to militarily threaten the region, but it has produced new and unanticipated security challenges for the Persian Gulf states (Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Bahrain, Qatar, Oman, and the United Arab Emirates). The Gulf states, which are all led by Sunni Muslim regimes, fear that Shiite Iran is unchecked now that Iraq is strategically weak. Most Gulf states, particularly Saudi Arabia, have provided only halting support to the fledgling government in Baghdad and revived the focus on U.S.-Gulf defense cooperation as existed in the 1990s. The Bush Administration advocates more rapid and sweeping political and economic liberalization as key to long-term Gulf stability and to reducing support in the Gulf states for terrorist groups such as Al Qaeda.
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The Persian Gulf States: Issues for U.S. Policy, 2006

The Persian Gulf States: Issues for U.S. Policy, 2006

Date: August 21, 2006
Creator: Katzman, Kenneth
Description: None
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The Persian Gulf States: Issues for U.S. Policy, 2006

The Persian Gulf States: Issues for U.S. Policy, 2006

Date: August 21, 2006
Creator: Katzman, Kenneth
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Sanchez-Llamas v. Oregon:

Sanchez-Llamas v. Oregon:

Date: August 14, 2006
Creator: Garcia, Michael John & Vieux, Anthony
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department