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 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
Syria: U.S. Relations and Bilateral Issues

Syria: U.S. Relations and Bilateral Issues

Date: September 14, 2006
Creator: Prados, Alfred B.
Description: An array of bilateral issues continues to affect relations between the United States and Syria: the course of Arab-Israeli talks; questions of arms proliferation; Syrian connections with terrorist activity; Syria's role in Lebanon; and Syria's opposition to the U.S. occupation in Iraq. U.S. officials and Members of Congress have blamed Syria for helping transfer rockets and other arms to Hezbollah units. This report outlines the current political situation in Syria, as well as Syria's political relationship with the United States and related legislation.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Syria: U.S. Relations and Bilateral Issues

Syria: U.S. Relations and Bilateral Issues

Date: July 27, 2006
Creator: Prados, Alfred B.
Description: An array of bilateral issues continue to affect relations between the United States and Syria: the course of Arab-Israeli talks; questions of arms proliferation; Syrian connections with terrorist activity; Syria's role in Lebanon; and Syria's opposition to the U.S. occupation in Iraq. A variety of U.S. legislative provisions and executive directives prohibit direct aid to Syria and restrict bilateral trade relations between the two countries, due largely to Syria's designation by the U.S. State Department as a sponsor of international terrorism. This report outlines in detail U.S.-Syrian relations, including discussion of the assassination of former Lebanese Prime Minister Rafiq Hariri, the outbreak of Hezballah-related violence, and related legislation.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Israel: Background and Relations with the United States

Israel: Background and Relations with the United States

Date: September 21, 2006
Creator: Migdalovitz, Carol
Description: Armed conflict has marked every decade of Israel's existence. Despite its unstable regional environment, Israel has developed a vibrant parliamentary democracy, albeit with relatively fragile governments. Israel has an advanced industrial, market economy in which the government plays a substantial role. Israel's foreign policy is focused largely on its region, Europe, and the United States. Since 1948, the United States and Israel have developed a close friendship based on common democratic values, religious affinities, and security interests. The two countries have close security relations. Other issues in U.S.-Israeli relations include Israel's military sales to China, inadequate Israeli protection of U.S. intellectual property, and espionage-related cases.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Israel: Background and Relations with the United States

Israel: Background and Relations with the United States

Date: July 26, 2006
Creator: Migdalovitz, Carol
Description: On May 14, 1948, the State of Israel declared its independence and was immediately engaged in a war with all of its neighbors. Despite the fact that armed conflict has marked every decade of Israel's existence, Israel has developed a vibrant parliamentary democracy and an advanced industrial, market economy. Since 1948, the United States and Israel have developed a close friendship based on common democratic values, religious affinities, and security interests. This report outlines the current state of Israeli government and economy, as well as general relations between the U.S. and Israel.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Israel: Background and Relations with the United States

Israel: Background and Relations with the United States

Date: June 14, 2006
Creator: Migdalovitz, Carol
Description: Armed conflict has marked every decade of Israel's existence. Despite its unstable regional environment, Israel has developed a vibrant parliamentary democracy, albeit with relatively fragile governments. Israel has an advanced industrial, market economy in which the government plays a substantial role. The economy is now doing very well, and increased social spending is expected. Israel's foreign policy is focused largely on its region, Europe, and the United States. European countries collectively are Israel's second largest trading partner, and the EU participates in the peace process. Since 1948, the United States and Israel have developed a close friendship based on common democratic values, religious affinities, and security interests. Current issues in U.S.-Israeli relations include Israel's military sales to China, inadequate Israeli protection of U.S. intellectual property, and espionage-related cases.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Israel: Background and Relations with the United States

Israel: Background and Relations with the United States

Date: August 31, 2006
Creator: Migdalovitz, Carol
Description: On May 14, 1948, the State of Israel declared its independence and was immediately engaged in a war with all of its neighbors. Despite the fact that armed conflict has marked every decade of Israel's existence, Israel has developed a vibrant parliamentary democracy and an advanced industrial, market economy. Since 1948, the United States and Israel have developed a close friendship based on common democratic values, religious affinities, and security interests. This report outlines the current state of Israeli government and economy, as well as general relations between the U.S. and Israel.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Central Asia: Regional Developments and Implications for U.S. Interests

Central Asia: Regional Developments and Implications for U.S. Interests

Date: June 5, 2006
Creator: Nichol, Jim
Description: After the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, the United States recognized the independence of all the former Central Asian republics, supported their admission into Western organizations, and elicited Turkish support to counter Iranian influence in the region. Soon after the terrorist attacks on America on September 11, 2001, all the Central Asia states offered overflight and other support to coalition anti-terrorist efforts in Afghanistan. After September 11, 2001, U.S. policy emphasized bolstering the security of the Central Asian states to help them combat terrorism, proliferation, and arms trafficking. Other U.S. objectives include promoting democratization, free markets, human rights, and energy development, as well as integrating these states into the international community.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Central Asia: Regional Developments and Implications for U.S. Interests

Central Asia: Regional Developments and Implications for U.S. Interests

Date: June 29, 2006
Creator: Nichol, Jim
Description: After the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, the United States recognized the independence of all the former Central Asian republics, supported their admission into Western organizations, and elicited Turkish support to counter Iranian influence in the region. The Administration's diverse goals in Central Asia reflect the different characteristics of these states. U.S. interests in Kazakhstan include securing and eliminating Soviet-era nuclear and biological weapons materials and facilities. In Tajikistan, U.S. aid focuses on economic reconstruction. U.S. energy firms have invested in oil and natural gas development in Kazakhstan and Turkmenistan. This report outlines the above, as well as several ongoing debates regarding general relations between the U.S. and Central Asia.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Central Asia: Regional Developments and Implications for U.S. Interests

Central Asia: Regional Developments and Implications for U.S. Interests

Date: August 4, 2006
Creator: Nichol, Jim
Description: After the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, the United States recognized the independence of all the former Central Asian republics, supported their admission into Western organizations, and elicited Turkish support to counter Iranian influence in the region. The Administration's diverse goals in Central Asia reflect the different characteristics of these states. U.S. interests in Kazakhstan include securing and eliminating Soviet-era nuclear and biological weapons materials and facilities. In Tajikistan, U.S. aid focuses on economic reconstruction. U.S. energy firms have invested in oil and natural gas development in Kazakhstan and Turkmenistan. This report outlines the above, as well as several ongoing debates regarding general relations between the U.S. and Central Asia.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Japan-U.S. Relations: Issues for Congress

Japan-U.S. Relations: Issues for Congress

Date: June 30, 2006
Creator: Chanlett-Avery, Emma; Manyin, Mark E. & Cooper, William H.
Description: The post-World War II U.S.-Japan alliance has long been an anchor of the U.S. security role in East Asia. The alliance, with its access to bases in Japan, where about 53,000 U.S. troops are stationed, facilitates the forward deployment of U.S. military forces in the Asia-Pacific, thereby undergirding U.S. national security strategy. For Japan, the alliance and the U.S. nuclear umbrella provide maneuvering room in dealing with its neighbors, particularly China and North Korea. The Bush Administration has made significant strides in its goals of broadening U.S.-Japan strategic cooperation and encouraging Japan to assume a more active international role. Most of these developments have been viewed warily by South Korea and opposed outright by China. Japan is one of the United States' most important economic partners. Outside of North America, it is the United States' largest export market and second-largest source of imports.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department