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 Country: China
 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
Taiwan-Mainland China Relations: Status, Prospects, U.S. Interests, and Options

Taiwan-Mainland China Relations: Status, Prospects, U.S. Interests, and Options

Date: September 8, 1995
Creator: Sutter, Robert G
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
China-U.S. Relations: Current Issues and Implications for U.S. Policy

China-U.S. Relations: Current Issues and Implications for U.S. Policy

Date: February 14, 2007
Creator: Dumbaugh, Kerry
Description: The bilateral relationship between the U.S. and the People's Republic of China (PRC) is vitally important, touching on a wide range of areas including, among others, economic policy, security, foreign relations, and human rights. This report addresses relevant policy questions in current U.S.-China relations, discusses trends and key legislation in the current Congress, and provides a chronology of developments and high-level exchanges.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
China-U.S. Relations: Current Issues and Implications for U.S. Policy

China-U.S. Relations: Current Issues and Implications for U.S. Policy

Date: July 14, 2006
Creator: Dumbaugh, Kerry
Description: The bilateral relationship between the U.S. and the People's Republic of China (PRC) is vitally important, touching on a wide range of areas including, among others, economic policy, security, foreign relations, and human rights. This report addresses relevant policy questions in current U.S.-China relations, discusses trends and key legislation in the current Congress, and provides a chronology of developments and high-level exchanges.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
China-U.S. Relations: Current Issues and Implications for U.S. Policy

China-U.S. Relations: Current Issues and Implications for U.S. Policy

Date: September 22, 2006
Creator: Dumbaugh, Kerry
Description: The bilateral relationship between the U.S. and the People's Republic of China (PRC) is vitally important, touching on a wide range of areas including, among others, economic policy, security, foreign relations, and human rights. This report addresses relevant policy questions in current U.S.-China relations, discusses trends and key legislation in the current Congress, and provides a chronology of developments and high-level exchanges.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Internet Development and Information Control in the People's Republic of China

Internet Development and Information Control in the People's Republic of China

Date: February 10, 2006
Creator: Lum, Thomas
Description: Since its founding in 1949, the People’s Republic of China (PRC) has exerted great effort in manipulating the flow of information and prohibiting the dissemination of viewpoints that criticize the government or stray from the official Communist party view. The introduction of Internet technology in the mid-1990’s presented a challenge to government control over news sources, and by extension, over public opinion. While the Internet has developed rapidly, broadened access to news, and facilitated mass communications in China, many forms of expression online, as in other mass media, are still significantly stifled. This report discusses the history of this issue and examines the U.S.'s response.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Internet Development and Information Control in the People's Republic of China

Internet Development and Information Control in the People's Republic of China

Date: November 22, 2005
Creator: Lau, Michelle W.
Description: Since its founding in 1949, the People’s Republic of China (PRC) has exerted great effort in manipulating the flow of information and prohibiting the dissemination of viewpoints that criticize the government or stray from the official Communist party view. The introduction of Internet technology in the mid-1990’s presented a challenge to government control over news sources, and by extension, over public opinion. While the Internet has developed rapidly, broadened access to news, and facilitated mass communications in China, many forms of expression online, as in other mass media, are still significantly stifled. This report discusses the history of this issue and examines the U.S.'s response.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
China and "Falun Gong"

China and "Falun Gong"

Date: February 12, 2003
Creator: Lum, Thomas
Description: “Falun Gong,” also known as “Falun Dafa,”1 combines an exercise regimen with meditation and moral tenets. The “Falun Gong” movement has led to the largest and most protracted public demonstrations in China since the democracy movement of 1989. On April 25, 1999, an estimated 10,000 to 30,000 adherents assembled in front of Zhongnanhai, the Chinese Communist Party leadership compound, and participated in a silent protest against state repression of their activities. On July 21, 1999, the People’s Republic of China (PRC) government, fearful of the spread of social unrest, outlawed the movement and began to arrest Falun Gong protesters.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
China and "Falun Gong"

China and "Falun Gong"

Date: August 3, 2001
Creator: Lum, Thomas
Description: The “Falun Gong” movement has led to the largest and most protracted public demonstrations in China since the democracy movement of 1989. On April 25, 1999, an estimated 10,000 to 30,000 adherents assembled in front of Zhongnanhai, the Chinese Communist Party leadership compound, and participated in a silent protest against state repression of their activities. On July 21, 1999, the People’s Republic of China (PRC) government, fearful of the spread of social unrest, outlawed the movement and began to arrest Falun Gong protesters.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
China and Falun Gong

China and Falun Gong

Date: May 25, 2006
Creator: Lum, Thomas
Description: “Falun Gong,” also known as “Falun Dafa,”1 combines an exercise regimen with meditation and moral tenets. The “Falun Gong” movement has led to the largest and most protracted public demonstrations in China since the democracy movement of 1989. On April 25, 1999, an estimated 10,000 to 30,000 adherents assembled in front of Zhongnanhai, the Chinese Communist Party leadership compound, and participated in a silent protest against state repression of their activities. On July 21, 1999, the People’s Republic of China (PRC) government, fearful of the spread of social unrest, outlawed the movement and began to arrest Falun Gong protesters.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
China and "Falun Gong"

China and "Falun Gong"

Date: May 1, 2002
Creator: Lum, Thomas
Description: “Falun Gong,” also known as “Falun Dafa,”1 combines an exercise regimen with meditation and moral tenets. The “Falun Gong” movement has led to the largest and most protracted public demonstrations in China since the democracy movement of 1989. On April 25, 1999, an estimated 10,000 to 30,000 adherents assembled in front of Zhongnanhai, the Chinese Communist Party leadership compound, and participated in a silent protest against state repression of their activities. On July 21, 1999, the People’s Republic of China (PRC) government, fearful of the spread of social unrest, outlawed the movement and began to arrest Falun Gong protesters.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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