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 Resource Type: Report
 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
Lebanon

Lebanon

Date: June 8, 2006
Creator: Prados, Alfred B.
Description: The United States and Lebanon continue to enjoy good relations. Prominent current issues between the United States and Lebanon include progress toward a Lebanon-Israel peace treaty, U.S. aid to Lebanon, and Lebanon's capacity to stop Hizballah militia attacks on Israel. Lebanon's government is based in part on a 1943 agreement that called for a Maronite Christian President, a Sunni Muslim Prime Minister, and a Shi'ite Muslim Speaker of the National Assembly. This report explores the above, as well as the assassination of former Lebanese Prime Minister Rafiq Hariri and the formation of a new Lebanese government following the withdrawal of Syrian forces from Lebanon.
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Taiwan: Recent Developments and U.S. Policy Choices

Taiwan: Recent Developments and U.S. Policy Choices

Date: June 8, 2006
Creator: Dumbaugh, Kerry
Description: Under the Bush Administration, U.S.-China-Taiwan relations have undergone a number of changes. Initially, the new Administration seemed to abandon the long-standing U.S. policy of "strategic ambiguity" on Taiwan in favor of "strategic clarity" that placed more emphasis on Taiwan's interests and less on PRC concerns. President Bush's first term has been a time of increasing complexity and unpredictability in Taiwan's political environment. Political trends in Taiwan have raised anxieties about its future and the implications for U.S. policy.
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Japan-U.S. Relations: Issues for Congress in the 1990s

Japan-U.S. Relations: Issues for Congress in the 1990s

Date: May 25, 1994
Creator: Sutter, Robert G; Cooper, William H; Jackson, James K; McLoughlin, Glenn J; Shinn, Rinn-Sup & Cronin, Richard P
Description: None
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Japan-U.S. Relations: Issues for Congress in the 1990s

Japan-U.S. Relations: Issues for Congress in the 1990s

Date: November 21, 1994
Creator: Sutter, Robert G; Cooper, William H; Jackson, James K; McLoughlin, Glenn J; Shinn, Rinn-Sup & Cronin, Richard P
Description: None
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U.S. Direct Investment Abroad: Trends and Current Issues

U.S. Direct Investment Abroad: Trends and Current Issues

Date: August 15, 2008
Creator: Jackson, James K.
Description: The United States is the largest investor abroad and the largest recipient of direct investment in the world. Some observers believe U.S. firms invest abroad to avoid U.S. labor unions or high U.S. wages, however, 70% of U.S. foreign direct investment is concentrated in high income developed countries. Even more striking is the fact that the share of investment going to developing countries has fallen in recent years. Most economists conclude that direct investment abroad does not lead to fewer jobs or lower incomes overall for Americans and that the majority of jobs lost among U.S. manufacturing firms over the past decade reflect a broad restructuring of U.S. manufacturing industries.
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Cuba: Issues for the 109th Congress

Cuba: Issues for the 109th Congress

Date: August 8, 2006
Creator: Sullivan, Mark P.
Description: Cuba has remained a hard-line communist state under Fidel Castro for more than 47 years, but Fidel's July 31, 2006, announcement that he was ceding political power to his brother Raúl "for several weeks" in order to recover from surgery could be the beginning of a political transition. Since the early 1960s, U.S. policy toward Cuba has consisted largely of isolating the island nation through comprehensive economic sanctions, which have been significantly tightened by the Bush Administration. Another component of U.S. policy consists of support measures for the Cuban people. There are several schools of thought on how to achieve the objective of bringing democracy and respect for human rights to Cuba: some advocate maximum pressure on Cuba until reforms are enacted; others argue for lifting some U.S. sanctions judged to be hurting the Cuban people; and still others call for a swift normalization of U.S.-Cuban relations.
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U.S. Embassy in Iraq

U.S. Embassy in Iraq

Date: August 8, 2008
Creator: Epstein, Susan B.
Description: Construction of the New Embassy Compound (NEC) in Baghdad is completed and, as of early August 2008, about 50% of post staff have moved in. Construction problems and additional requirements, including adding space at the embassy compound for General Patraeus and his staff, as requested in a mid-2007 report by State's then- Director of Management and Planning, delayed the opening by a year and raised the cost from the original $592 million estimate to about $736 million. The Department of State has a goal of having all U.S. government personnel moved in by the end of 2008.
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The Kurds in Post-Saddam Iraq

The Kurds in Post-Saddam Iraq

Date: October 23, 2008
Creator: Katzman, Kenneth
Description: The Kurdish-inhabited region of northern Iraq is relatively peaceful and prospering economically, but the Iraqi Kurds' political autonomy and political strength in post- Saddam Iraq is causing friction with Arab leaders in Iraq, Turkey, and Iran. However, an overall reduction in violence in Iraq, coupled with continued U.S. political influence over the Kurds, is likely to prevent a destabilizing escalation of the Iraqi Kurd-Arab disputes. Also see CRS Report RL31339, Iraq: Post-Saddam Governance and Security, by Kenneth Katzman.
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The Kurds in Post-Saddam Iraq

The Kurds in Post-Saddam Iraq

Date: August 5, 2008
Creator: Katzman, Kenneth
Description: The Kurdish-inhabited region of northern Iraq is relatively peaceful and prospering economically, but the Iraqi Kurds' political autonomy and political strength in post- Saddam Iraq is causing friction with Arab leaders in Iraq, Turkey, and Iran. However, an overall reduction in violence in Iraq, coupled with continued U.S. political influence over the Kurds, is likely to prevent a destabilizing escalation of the Iraqi Kurd-Arab disputes. Also see CRS Report RL31339, Iraq: Post-Saddam Governance and Security, by Kenneth Katzman.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Guam: U.S. Defense Deployments

Guam: U.S. Defense Deployments

Date: October 29, 2008
Creator: Kan, Shirley A. & Niksch, Larry A.
Description: The U.S. military is building up forces on the U.S. territory of Guam to increase deterrence and power projection for possible responses to crises and disasters, counterterrorism, and contingencies in support of South Korea, Japan, the Philippines, Taiwan, or elsewhere in Asia. But the defense buildup on Guam is moderate. Guam's role has increased with plans to withdraw some U.S. forces from Japan and South Korea. The buildup will cost $10.3 billion, with Japan contributing about 60% ($6.1 billion).
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department