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 Resource Type: Report
 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
Ethiopian Food Situation: International Response

Ethiopian Food Situation: International Response

Date: June 28, 1985
Creator: Barnes, Lafayette
Description: The United States has donated the largest share of the world-wide relief effort. Members of Congress nave passed legislation, the African Famine Relief and Recovery Act of 1985 (2.L. 99-8), authorizing emergency relief assistance to Ethiopia and other famine-stricken countries. Some observers favor trying to remove restrictions that prohibit long-term agricultural development assistance and other forms of economic aid to Ethiopia, but many continue to believe that aid to this Marxist-oriented nation should be limited to humanitarian relief. The Ethiopian food situation will probably remain a central issue among U.S. lawmakers and relief officials during the 99th Congress.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Animal Identification and Meat Traceability

Animal Identification and Meat Traceability

Date: March 7, 2006
Creator: Becker, Geoffrey S
Description: U.S. animal agriculture is seeking to improve its ability to trace the movement of livestock from their birthplace to slaughter. The livestock and meat industries are working with the U.S. government to develop a national animal identification (ID) plan for livestock disease tracking purposes. This report focuses on animal ID and, to a lesser extent, on meat traceability.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Animal Identification and Meat Traceability

Animal Identification and Meat Traceability

Date: September 2, 2005
Creator: Becker, Geoffrey S
Description: U.S. animal agriculture is seeking to improve its ability to trace the movement of livestock from their birthplace to slaughter. The livestock and meat industries are working with the U.S. government to develop a national animal identification (ID) plan for livestock disease tracking purposes. This report focuses on animal ID and, to a lesser extent, on meat traceability.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Country-of-Origin Labeling for Foods

Country-of-Origin Labeling for Foods

Date: November 8, 2005
Creator: Becker, Geoffrey S
Description: H.R. 2744, USDA’s FY2006 appropriation, again postpones rules requiring many retailers to provide country-of-origin labeling (COOL) for fresh produce, red meats, and peanuts — until September 30, 2008. Mandatory COOL for seafood was finalized on September 30, 2004. Some in Congress still strongly support mandatory COOL, and say they voted against final passage of H.R. 2744 because of the delay. Others counter that COOL should be voluntary. Several pending bills would alter the program including H.R. 2068, H.R. 2744, S. 135, S. 1300, S. 1331, and S. 1333.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Country-of-Origin Labeling for Foods

Country-of-Origin Labeling for Foods

Date: January 28, 2003
Creator: Becker, Geoffrey S
Description: Federal law requires most imports, including many food items, to bear labels informing the “ultimate purchaser” of their country of origin. Meats, produce, and several other raw agricultural products generally have been exempt. The omnibus farm law (P.L. 107-171) signed on May 13, 2002, contains a requirement that many retailers provide, starting on September 30, 2004, country-of-origin labeling (COOL) on fresh fruits and vegetables, red meats, seafood, and peanuts. The program is voluntary until then. USDA on October 8, 2002, issued guidelines for the voluntary labeling program.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Country-of-Origin Labeling for Foods

Country-of-Origin Labeling for Foods

Date: June 3, 2005
Creator: Becker, Geoffrey S
Description: The 2002 farm bill (P.L. 107-171) as modified by the FY2004 USDA appropriation (P.L. 108-199) mandates retail country-of-origin labeling (COOL) for fresh produce, red meats, and peanuts starting September 30, 2006, and for seafood starting September 30, 2004. Some in Congress still strongly support mandatory COOL, especially after discoveries since 2003 of “mad cow” disease in four Canadian-born cattle. Others counter that COOL is a marketing, not an animal or human health, concern and should be voluntary.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Country-of-Origin Labeling for Foods

Country-of-Origin Labeling for Foods

Date: June 14, 2002
Creator: Becker, Geoffrey S
Description: Federal law requires most imports, including many food items, to bear labels informing the “ultimate purchaser” of their country of origin. Meats, produce, and several other raw agricultural products generally have been exempt. The omnibus farm law (P.L. 107-171) signed on May 13, 2002, contains a requirement that many retailers provide, starting on September 30, 2004, country-of-origin labeling (COOL) on fresh fruits and vegetables, red meats, seafood, and peanuts. The program is voluntary until then. USDA on October 8, 2002, issued guidelines for the voluntary labeling program.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Country-of-Origin Labeling for Foods

Country-of-Origin Labeling for Foods

Date: August 3, 2004
Creator: Becker, Geoffrey S
Description: The 2002 farm bill (P.L. 107-171) as modified by the FY2004 USDA appropriation (P.L. 108-199) requires country-of-origin labeling (COOL) for fresh produce, red meats, and peanuts starting September 30, 2006, and for seafood starting September 30, 2004. The House Agriculture Committee approved on July 21, 2004, a bill (H.R. 4576) to make COOL voluntary. Some lawmakers still support a mandatory program, especially after recent discoveries of “mad cow” disease in a Canadian and a U.S. cow (the latter from Canada). Others counter that COOL is a marketing, not an animal or human health, issue and should be voluntary.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Country-of-Origin Labeling for Foods

Country-of-Origin Labeling for Foods

Date: September 26, 2003
Creator: Becker, Geoffrey S
Description: Federal law requires most imports, including many food items, to bear labels informing the “ultimate purchaser” of their country of origin. Meats, produce, and several other raw agricultural products generally have been exempt. The omnibus farm law (P.L. 107-171) signed on May 13, 2002, contains a requirement that many retailers provide, starting on September 30, 2004, country-of-origin labeling (COOL) on fresh fruits and vegetables, red meats, seafood, and peanuts. The program is voluntary until then. USDA on October 8, 2002, issued guidelines for the voluntary labeling program.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Country-of-Origin Labeling for Foods

Country-of-Origin Labeling for Foods

Date: July 30, 2003
Creator: Becker, Geoffrey S
Description: Federal law requires most imports, including many food items, to bear labels informing the “ultimate purchaser” of their country of origin. Meats, produce, and several other raw agricultural products generally have been exempt. The omnibus farm law (P.L. 107-171) signed on May 13, 2002, contains a requirement that many retailers provide, starting on September 30, 2004, country-of-origin labeling (COOL) on fresh fruits and vegetables, red meats, seafood, and peanuts. The program is voluntary until then. USDA on October 8, 2002, issued guidelines for the voluntary labeling program.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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