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 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP): A Primer on Eligibility and Benefits

Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP): A Primer on Eligibility and Benefits

Date: October 20, 2014
Creator: Aussenberg, Randy A.
Description: This report focuses on Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) eligibility and the form and function of benefits. SNAP, formerly called the Food Stamp Program, is designed primarily to increase the food purchasing power of eligible low-income households to help them buy a nutritionally adequate low-cost diet.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP): A Primer on Eligibility and Benefits

Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP): A Primer on Eligibility and Benefits

Date: December 29, 2014
Creator: Aussenberg, Randy A.
Description: This report focuses on Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) eligibility and the form and function of benefits. SNAP, formerly called the Food Stamp Program, is designed primarily to increase the food purchasing power of eligible low-income households to help them buy a nutritionally adequate low-cost diet.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Domestic Food Assistance: Summary of Programs

Domestic Food Assistance: Summary of Programs

Date: February 4, 2015
Creator: Aussenberg, Randy A. & Colello, Kirsten J.
Description: This report gives an overview of the federal programs that provide food assistance within the United States and the territories, including a discussion of common concepts and themes across the network of domestic food assistance programs.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Budget for Fiscal Year 2008

The Budget for Fiscal Year 2008

Date: January 4, 2008
Creator: Austin, D. Andrew
Description: This report discusses the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) FY2009 budget request of $2.676 billion that would provide a 17.9% increase ($406 million) over FY2008. It includes an overview and breakdowns for specific programs: Foods Program, Human Drugs Program, Biologics program, Animal Drugs and Feed Program, and the Devices and Radiological Health Program.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Ethiopian Food Situation: International Response

Ethiopian Food Situation: International Response

Date: June 28, 1985
Creator: Barnes, Lafayette
Description: The United States has donated the largest share of the world-wide relief effort. Members of Congress nave passed legislation, the African Famine Relief and Recovery Act of 1985 (2.L. 99-8), authorizing emergency relief assistance to Ethiopia and other famine-stricken countries. Some observers favor trying to remove restrictions that prohibit long-term agricultural development assistance and other forms of economic aid to Ethiopia, but many continue to believe that aid to this Marxist-oriented nation should be limited to humanitarian relief. The Ethiopian food situation will probably remain a central issue among U.S. lawmakers and relief officials during the 99th Congress.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Animal Identification and Meat Traceability

Animal Identification and Meat Traceability

Date: March 7, 2006
Creator: Becker, Geoffrey S
Description: U.S. animal agriculture is seeking to improve its ability to trace the movement of livestock from their birthplace to slaughter. The livestock and meat industries are working with the U.S. government to develop a national animal identification (ID) plan for livestock disease tracking purposes. This report focuses on animal ID and, to a lesser extent, on meat traceability.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Animal Identification and Meat Traceability

Animal Identification and Meat Traceability

Date: September 2, 2005
Creator: Becker, Geoffrey S
Description: U.S. animal agriculture is seeking to improve its ability to trace the movement of livestock from their birthplace to slaughter. The livestock and meat industries are working with the U.S. government to develop a national animal identification (ID) plan for livestock disease tracking purposes. This report focuses on animal ID and, to a lesser extent, on meat traceability.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Animal Identification and Meat Traceability

Animal Identification and Meat Traceability

Date: June 28, 2005
Creator: Becker, Geoffrey S
Description: This report focuses on animal ID and meat traceability. However, traceability, and the somewhat different but related concepts of “identity preservation” and “product segregation,” also pertain to other agricultural products (e.g., grains) and issues (e.g., genetically modified, or GM, crops; the labeling of GM foods; and the production and labeling of organic foods)
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Country-of-Origin Labeling for Foods

Country-of-Origin Labeling for Foods

Date: June 3, 2005
Creator: Becker, Geoffrey S
Description: The 2002 farm bill (P.L. 107-171) as modified by the FY2004 USDA appropriation (P.L. 108-199) mandates retail country-of-origin labeling (COOL) for fresh produce, red meats, and peanuts starting September 30, 2006, and for seafood starting September 30, 2004. Some in Congress still strongly support mandatory COOL, especially after discoveries since 2003 of “mad cow” disease in four Canadian-born cattle. Others counter that COOL is a marketing, not an animal or human health, concern and should be voluntary.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Country-of-Origin Labeling for Foods

Country-of-Origin Labeling for Foods

Date: January 28, 2003
Creator: Becker, Geoffrey S
Description: Federal law requires most imports, including many food items, to bear labels informing the “ultimate purchaser” of their country of origin. Meats, produce, and several other raw agricultural products generally have been exempt. The omnibus farm law (P.L. 107-171) signed on May 13, 2002, contains a requirement that many retailers provide, starting on September 30, 2004, country-of-origin labeling (COOL) on fresh fruits and vegetables, red meats, seafood, and peanuts. The program is voluntary until then. USDA on October 8, 2002, issued guidelines for the voluntary labeling program.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Country-of-Origin Labeling for Foods

Country-of-Origin Labeling for Foods

Date: November 8, 2005
Creator: Becker, Geoffrey S
Description: H.R. 2744, USDA’s FY2006 appropriation, again postpones rules requiring many retailers to provide country-of-origin labeling (COOL) for fresh produce, red meats, and peanuts — until September 30, 2008. Mandatory COOL for seafood was finalized on September 30, 2004. Some in Congress still strongly support mandatory COOL, and say they voted against final passage of H.R. 2744 because of the delay. Others counter that COOL should be voluntary. Several pending bills would alter the program including H.R. 2068, H.R. 2744, S. 135, S. 1300, S. 1331, and S. 1333.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Country-of-Origin Labeling for Foods

Country-of-Origin Labeling for Foods

Date: January 28, 2003
Creator: Becker, Geoffrey S
Description: Federal law requires most imports, including many food items, to bear labels informing the “ultimate purchaser” of their country of origin. Meats, produce, and several other raw agricultural products generally have been exempt. The omnibus farm law (P.L. 107-171) signed on May 13, 2002, contains a requirement that many retailers provide, starting on September 30, 2004, country-of-origin labeling (COOL) on fresh fruits and vegetables, red meats, seafood, and peanuts. The program is voluntary until then. USDA on October 8, 2002, issued guidelines for the voluntary labeling program.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Country-of-Origin Labeling for Foods

Country-of-Origin Labeling for Foods

Date: June 18, 2003
Creator: Becker, Geoffrey S
Description: Federal law requires most imports, including many food items, to bear labels informing the “ultimate purchaser” of their country of origin. Meats, produce, and several other raw agricultural products generally have been exempt. The omnibus farm law (P.L. 107-171) signed on May 13, 2002, contains a requirement that many retailers provide, starting on September 30, 2004, country-of-origin labeling (COOL) on fresh fruits and vegetables, red meats, seafood, and peanuts. The program is voluntary until then. USDA on October 8, 2002, issued guidelines for the voluntary labeling program.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Country-of-Origin Labeling for Foods

Country-of-Origin Labeling for Foods

Date: July 30, 2003
Creator: Becker, Geoffrey S
Description: Federal law requires most imports, including many food items, to bear labels informing the “ultimate purchaser” of their country of origin. Meats, produce, and several other raw agricultural products generally have been exempt. The omnibus farm law (P.L. 107-171) signed on May 13, 2002, contains a requirement that many retailers provide, starting on September 30, 2004, country-of-origin labeling (COOL) on fresh fruits and vegetables, red meats, seafood, and peanuts. The program is voluntary until then. USDA on October 8, 2002, issued guidelines for the voluntary labeling program.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Country-of-Origin Labeling for Foods

Country-of-Origin Labeling for Foods

Date: September 26, 2003
Creator: Becker, Geoffrey S
Description: Federal law requires most imports, including many food items, to bear labels informing the “ultimate purchaser” of their country of origin. Meats, produce, and several other raw agricultural products generally have been exempt. The omnibus farm law (P.L. 107-171) signed on May 13, 2002, contains a requirement that many retailers provide, starting on September 30, 2004, country-of-origin labeling (COOL) on fresh fruits and vegetables, red meats, seafood, and peanuts. The program is voluntary until then. USDA on October 8, 2002, issued guidelines for the voluntary labeling program.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Country-of-Origin Labeling for Foods

Country-of-Origin Labeling for Foods

Date: August 3, 2004
Creator: Becker, Geoffrey S
Description: The 2002 farm bill (P.L. 107-171) as modified by the FY2004 USDA appropriation (P.L. 108-199) requires country-of-origin labeling (COOL) for fresh produce, red meats, and peanuts starting September 30, 2006, and for seafood starting September 30, 2004. The House Agriculture Committee approved on July 21, 2004, a bill (H.R. 4576) to make COOL voluntary. Some lawmakers still support a mandatory program, especially after recent discoveries of “mad cow” disease in a Canadian and a U.S. cow (the latter from Canada). Others counter that COOL is a marketing, not an animal or human health, issue and should be voluntary.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Country-of-Origin Labeling for Foods

Country-of-Origin Labeling for Foods

Date: June 14, 2002
Creator: Becker, Geoffrey S
Description: Federal law requires most imports, including many food items, to bear labels informing the “ultimate purchaser” of their country of origin. Meats, produce, and several other raw agricultural products generally have been exempt. The omnibus farm law (P.L. 107-171) signed on May 13, 2002, contains a requirement that many retailers provide, starting on September 30, 2004, country-of-origin labeling (COOL) on fresh fruits and vegetables, red meats, seafood, and peanuts. The program is voluntary until then. USDA on October 8, 2002, issued guidelines for the voluntary labeling program.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Country-of-Origin Labeling for Foods

Country-of-Origin Labeling for Foods

Date: October 11, 2002
Creator: Becker, Geoffrey S
Description: Federal law requires most imports, including many food items, to bear labels informing the “ultimate purchaser” of their country of origin. Meats, produce, and several other raw agricultural products generally have been exempt. The omnibus farm law (P.L. 107-171) signed on May 13, 2002, contains a requirement that many retailers provide, starting on September 30, 2004, country-of-origin labeling (COOL) on fresh fruits and vegetables, red meats, seafood, and peanuts. The program is voluntary until then. USDA on October 8, 2002, issued guidelines for the voluntary labeling program.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Country-of-Origin Labeling for Foods: Current Law and Proposed Changes

Country-of-Origin Labeling for Foods: Current Law and Proposed Changes

Date: March 27, 2001
Creator: Becker, Geoffrey S
Description: Federal law requires most imports, including many food items, to bear labels informing the “ultimate purchaser” of their country of origin. Various bills have been introduced to impose expanded country-of-origin labeling requirements on meats and on several other agricultural products. Such proposals have attracted attention for a number of reasons. One is that they are viewed (by some advocates) as a way to help U.S. producers dealing with low farm prices. Also, some perceive that food products from certain countries might pose greater risks than those from the United States.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Horse Slaughter Prevention Bills and Issues

Horse Slaughter Prevention Bills and Issues

Date: November 7, 2005
Creator: Becker, Geoffrey S
Description: This report discusses the debate in Congress on whether to ban horse slaughter and the acceptability of this practice.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Meat and Poultry Inspection: Background and Selected Issues

Meat and Poultry Inspection: Background and Selected Issues

Date: December 12, 2005
Creator: Becker, Geoffrey S
Description: This report discusses the responsibility of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA’s) Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) for inspecting most meat, poultry, and processed egg products for safety, wholesomeness, and proper labeling.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Meat and Poultry Inspection Issues

Meat and Poultry Inspection Issues

Date: November 4, 2004
Creator: Becker, Geoffrey S
Description: This report discusses the responsibility of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA’s) Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) for inspecting most meat, poultry, and processed egg products for safety, wholesomeness, and proper labeling.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Meat and Poultry Inspection Issues

Meat and Poultry Inspection Issues

Date: January 7, 2005
Creator: Becker, Geoffrey S
Description: This report discusses the responsibility of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA’s) Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) for inspecting most meat, poultry, and processed egg products for safety, wholesomeness, and proper labeling.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Agricultural Biotechnology: Background and Recent Issues

Agricultural Biotechnology: Background and Recent Issues

Date: March 7, 2005
Creator: Becker, Geoffrey S.
Description: Since the first genetically engineered (GE) crops (also called GM [genetically modified] crops, or GMOs, genetically modified organisms) became commercially available in the mid-1990s, U.S. soybean, cotton, and corn farmers have rapidly adopted them. As adoption has spread, there have been policy debates over the costs and benefits of GE products. Issues include the impacts of GE crops on the environment and food safety, and whether GE foods should be specially labeled. Congress generally has been supportive of GE agricultural products, although some Members have expressed wariness about their adoption and regulation. The 109th Congress will likely continue to follow trade developments, particularly the U.S.-EU dispute, as well as U.S. regulatory mechanisms for approving biotech foods.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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