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 Decade: 1990-1999
 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
Organic Foods and the Proposed Federal Certification and Labeling Program
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs691/
Food Additive Regulations: A Chronology
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs203/
Science Behind the Regulation of Food Safety: Risk Assessment and the Precautionary Principle
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs990/
The World Food Summit
Governments participating in the 1996 World Food Summit will examine how to deal with world hunger and malnutrition and achieve the goal of food security for all. There is broad agreement on the desirability of the Summit's goal, but controversy has developed over such issues as the relationship of trade liberalization and food security, the advisability of declaring a legal right to food, the link between population stabilization and reproductive health and food security, and responsibility within the UN system for Summit follow-up. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs331/
Food Stamp Benefits for Legal Immigrants in P.L. 105-185
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The Delaney Clause: The Dilemma of Regulating Health Risk for Pesticide Residues
Under the authority of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FFDCA), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is responsible for establishing tolerances for pesticide residues in or on foods and feeds. Tolerances are legal limits to the amount of pesticide residues that can be found on a raw agricultural commodity at the farm gate or in a processed food. The FFDCA has two sections, 408 and 409, which set up different and inconsistent criteria for setting tolerances for pesticide residues in foods. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs27/
The Delaney Dilemma: Regulating Pesticide Residues in Foods -- Seminar Proceedings, March 16, 1993
A provision in the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, the Delaney Clause, appears to lower risks in the setting of tolerances for pesticide residues. It prohibits any substance from being added to processed foods if it induces cancer in man or animals. In reality, the provision created a dilemma because the zero-risk statute makes it difficult to regulate pesticides. Because of the prescription of Delaney, tolerances (legal limits) are established differently for carcinogens and non-carcinogens and in raw and processed foods. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs60/
Food and Drug Administration: Selected Funding and Policy Issues
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Food and Agriculture: Prospective Issues in the 105th Congress
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs448/
Pesticide Legislation: Food Quality Protection Act of 1996
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs282/
Food Safety Agencies and Authorities: A Primer
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs694/
U.S.-European Agricultural Trade: Food Safety and Biotechnology Issues
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs518/
Federal Regulatory Structure for Egg Safety: Fact Sheet
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Child Nutrition Issues in the 105th Congress
This report covers proposed and enacted legislative initiatives to change child nutrition programs (including the WIC program) during 1997 and 1998. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs533/
Food and Agriculture Provisions in the FY1997 Supplemental Appropriations Act
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FY1998 USDA Budget and Appropriations: Domestic Food Programs
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World Health Organization: A Fact Sheet
The World Health organization (WHO), established in 1948, is the United Nations system's authority on international public health issues. It assists governments in improving national health services and in establishing worldwide standards for foods, chemicals, and biological and pharmaceutical products. WHO concentrates on preventive rather than curative programs, including efforts to eradicate endemic and other widespread diseases, stabilize population growth, improve nutrition, sanitation, and maternal and child care. WHO is not an operational agency. It works through contracts with other agencies and private voluntary organizations. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc26072/