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 Decade: 2000-2009
 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
U.S. Direct Investment Abroad:  Trends and Current Issues

U.S. Direct Investment Abroad: Trends and Current Issues

Date: April 29, 2005
Creator: Jackson, James K
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Electronic Banking: The Check Truncation Issue

Electronic Banking: The Check Truncation Issue

Date: July 3, 2003
Creator: Eubanks, Walter W
Description: If all checks were replaced by electronic transactions, the exact cost savings would still be unknown, because estimates of the cost of using a check and the number of checks written each year remain in dispute. Consequently, estimates of cost savings range from $1.4 billion annually for truncation alone to $68 billion for replacing checks with electronic payments. A significant part of the savings comes from eliminating the handling, sorting, and physically transporting of checks to the paying bank. To clear checks electronically, banks must negotiate processing agreements thatmake it unnecessary to physically present the paper check. Since the benefits are not uniformly dispersed among the participants, banks have found it difficult to obtain these agreements, thus constraining the widespread adoption of electronic check clearing.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Mergers and Consolidation Between Banking and Financial Services Firms: Trends and Prospects

Mergers and Consolidation Between Banking and Financial Services Firms: Trends and Prospects

Date: August 8, 2003
Creator: Jackson, William D
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Mergers and Consolidation Between Banking and Financial Services Firms: Trends and Prospects

Mergers and Consolidation Between Banking and Financial Services Firms: Trends and Prospects

Date: May 15, 2003
Creator: Jackson, William D
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Bankruptcy Reform in the 108th Congress

Bankruptcy Reform in the 108th Congress

Date: March 13, 2003
Creator: Welborn, Angie A
Description: On February 27, 2003, House Judiciary Chairman James Sensenbrenner introduced H.R. 975, the Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention and Consumer Protection Act of 2003. Subcommittee hearings were held on March 4, and the legislation was marked-up and ordered to be reported by the full committee on March 12. This report provides an overview of selected major provisions of the legislation.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Bankruptcy Reform in the 108th Congress

Bankruptcy Reform in the 108th Congress

Date: March 24, 2003
Creator: Welborn, Angie A
Description: On March 19, 2003, the House of Representatives passed H.R. 975, the Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention and Consumer Protection Act of 2003. H.R. 975, as introduced, was substantially similar to the legislation (H.R. 333) approved by both the House and the Senate during the 107th Congress, but omitted the Schumer Amendment which would have prevented the discharge of liability for willful violation of protective orders and violent protests against providers of “lawful services,” including reproductive health services. As passed by the House, H.R. 975 was amended to add sections to, among other things, increase the cap on wage and employee benefit claims. The Senate did not consider H.R. 975 during the first session of the 108th Congress. This report provides an overview of selected major provisions of the legislation.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Bankruptcy Reform in the 108th Congress

Bankruptcy Reform in the 108th Congress

Date: May 12, 2003
Creator: Welborn, Angie A
Description: On March 19, 2003, the House of Representatives passed H.R. 975, the Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention and Consumer Protection Act of 2003. H.R. 975, as introduced, was substantially similar to the legislation (H.R. 333) approved by both the House and the Senate during the 107th Congress, but omitted the Schumer Amendment which would have prevented the discharge of liability for willful violation of protective orders and violent protests against providers of “lawful services,” including reproductive health services. As passed by the House, H.R. 975 was amended to add sections to, among other things, increase the cap on wage and employee benefit claims. The Senate did not consider H.R. 975 during the first session of the 108th Congress. This report provides an overview of selected major provisions of the legislation.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Electronic Banking: The Check Truncation Issue

Electronic Banking: The Check Truncation Issue

Date: October 3, 2003
Creator: Eubanks, Walter W
Description: If all checks were replaced by electronic transactions, the exact cost savings would still be unknown, because estimates of the cost of using a check and the number of checks written each year remain in dispute. Consequently, estimates of cost savings range from $1.4 billion annually for truncation alone to $68 billion for replacing checks with electronic payments. A significant part of the savings comes from eliminating the handling, sorting, and physically transporting of checks to the paying bank. To clear checks electronically, banks must negotiate processing agreements thatmake it unnecessary to physically present the paper check. Since the benefits are not uniformly dispersed among the participants, banks have found it difficult to obtain these agreements, thus constraining the widespread adoption of electronic check clearing.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Electronic Banking: The Check Truncation Issue

Electronic Banking: The Check Truncation Issue

Date: May 30, 2003
Creator: Eubanks, Walter W
Description: If all checks were replaced by electronic transactions, the exact cost savings would still be unknown, because estimates of the cost of using a check and the number of checks written each year remain in dispute. Consequently, estimates of cost savings range from $1.4 billion annually for truncation alone to $68 billion for replacing checks with electronic payments. A significant part of the savings comes from eliminating the handling, sorting, and physically transporting of checks to the paying bank. To clear checks electronically, banks must negotiate processing agreements thatmake it unnecessary to physically present the paper check. Since the benefits are not uniformly dispersed among the participants, banks have found it difficult to obtain these agreements, thus constraining the widespread adoption of electronic check clearing.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Campaign Finance Reform: A Legal Analysis of Issue and Express Advocacy

Campaign Finance Reform: A Legal Analysis of Issue and Express Advocacy

Date: July 10, 2001
Creator: Whitaker, L. Paige
Description: Issue advocacy communications have become increasingly popular over the federal election cycles. Often these advertisements could be interpreted to favor or disfavor certain candidates, while also serving to inform the public about a policy issue. However, unlike communications that expressly advocate the election or defeat of a clearly identified candidate, the Supreme Court has ruled that issue ads are constitutionally protected First Amendment speech and cannot be regulated in any manner. According to most lower court rulings, only speech containing express words of advocacy of election or defeat, also known as “express advocacy” or “magic words” can be regulated as election-related communications and therefore be subject to the requirements of the Federal Election Campaign Act (FECA). Unlike express advocacy communications, therefore, issue ads may be paid for with funds unregulated by federal law, i.e., soft money
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department