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 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
Privacy Protection for Customer Financial Information

Privacy Protection for Customer Financial Information

Date: February 28, 2003
Creator: Murphy, M. Maureen
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Privacy Protection for Customer Financial Information

Privacy Protection for Customer Financial Information

Date: April 16, 2003
Creator: Murphy, M. Maureen
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Privacy Protection for Customer Financial Information

Privacy Protection for Customer Financial Information

Date: May 2, 2003
Creator: Murphy, M. Maureen
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Privacy Protection for Customer Financial Information

Privacy Protection for Customer Financial Information

Date: June 13, 2003
Creator: Murphy, M. Maureen
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Privacy Protection for Customer Financial Information

Privacy Protection for Customer Financial Information

Date: June 30, 2003
Creator: Murphy, M. Maureen
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Out-of-State Money in the Congressional Elections of 1992, 1994, and 1996: Trends and Policy Issues

Out-of-State Money in the Congressional Elections of 1992, 1994, and 1996: Trends and Policy Issues

Date: September 26, 1997
Creator: Cantor, Joseph E
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Consumer Bankruptcy Reform: Proposals Before the 105th Congress

Consumer Bankruptcy Reform: Proposals Before the 105th Congress

Date: March 20, 1998
Creator: Jeweler, Robin
Description: This report examines current consumer bankruptcy practice and the proposals set forth in the reform bills. Also considered are the legislative history of the current consumer bankruptcy scheme, and topics likely to be debated as Congress proceeds to consider consumer bankruptcy reform.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Cost-Benefit Analysis: Issues in Its Use in Regulation

Cost-Benefit Analysis: Issues in Its Use in Regulation

Date: June 28, 1995
Creator: Moore, John L
Description: This report sketches issues underlying broader use of cost-benefit analysis. It focuses on cost-benefit as one of several related frameworks for assessing regulatory actions or policies. Cost-benefit is the broadest of these frameworks, which also include impact assessment, risk assessment, and cost-effectiveness. Which analytical framework is appropriate depends on the regulatory context.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Banking's Proposed "Know Your Customer" Rules

Banking's Proposed "Know Your Customer" Rules

Date: August 31, 2001
Creator: Murphy, M. Maureen
Description: On December 7, 1998, federal banking regulators proposed regulations that would have required banks and thrifts to develop formal policies and procedures to identify unusual transactions in customers’ accounts to report as suspicious activity in conjunction with the federal laws outlawing money laundering. Although there were varied proposals before the 106th Congress on the issue, no legislation was enacted. The issue likeliest to command attention in the 107th Congress is international money laundering. There have been recent instances in which banking regulators imposed corrective action, comparable to the Know Your Customer requirements, on several international banking institutions after unearthing potential money laundering activity.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Campaign Finance Reform: A Legal Analysis of Issue and Express Advocacy

Campaign Finance Reform: A Legal Analysis of Issue and Express Advocacy

Date: March 12, 2001
Creator: Whitaker, L. Paige
Description: Issue advocacy communications have become increasingly popular in recent federal election cycles. These advertisements are often interpreted to favor or disfavor certain candidates, while also serving to inform the public about a policy issue. However, unlike communications that expressly advocate the election or defeat of a clearly identified candidate, the Supreme Court has determined that issue ads are constitutionally protected First Amendment speech that cannot be regulated in any manner. According to most lower court rulings, only speech containing express words of advocacy of election or defeat, also known as "express advocacy" or "magic words" can be regulated and therefore be subject to the requirements of the Federal Election Campaign Act (FECA). Unlike express advocacy communications, therefore, issue ads may be paid for with funds unregulated by federal law, i.e., soft money.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department