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 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
The Coalition Provisional Authority (CPA): Origin, Characteristics, and Institutional Authorities
Responsibility for overseeing reconstruction in post-conflict Iraq initially fell to the Office of Reconstruction and Humanitarian Assistance (ORHA). Established in early 2003, ORHA had been replaced by June of that year by the Coalition Provisional Authority (CPA). On June 28, 2004, CPA ceased operations. Whether CPA was a federal agency is unclear. Some executive branch documents supported the notion that it was created by the President. Another possibility is that the authority was created by, or pursuant to, United Nations Security Council Resolution 1483. This report discusses the issue of CPA's status as an agency, including the uncertain circumstances regarding its creation and demise, as well as relevant legislation and subsequent lawsuits. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs10420/
The Coalition Provisional Authority (CPA): Origin, Characteristics, and Institutional Authorities
The Coalition Provisional Authority (CPA or “the authority”) was established approximately one month after United States and coalition forces took control of Baghdad in Iraq on April 9, 2003.1 The authority’s mission was “to restore conditions of security and stability, to create conditions in which the Iraqi people can freely determine their own political future, (including by advancing efforts to restore and establish national and local institutions for representative governance) and facilitating economic recovery, sustainable reconstruction and development. This report discusses two views on how the authority was established, reviews selected characteristics of the authority, identifies statutory reporting requirements concerning the authority and the reconstruction of Iraq, and explores several policy issues. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs9933/
Department of Homeland Security Reorganization: The 2SR Initiative
This report focuses primarily on the conclusions and proposals resulting from 2SR pertaining to organization and managerial lines of authority matters. In one of his first actions as Secretary of Homeland Security Tom Ridge’s successor, Michael Chertoff, on March 2, 2005, announced in testimony before the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Homeland Security that he was “initiating a comprehensive review of the Department’s organization, operations, and policies.” This effort, he said, would begin “within days.” The results of that undertaking, which came to be known as the Second Stage Review or 2SR, were made public in mid-July. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs9942/
Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies: FY2013 Appropriations
This report will track and describe actions taken by the Administration and Congress to provide FY2013 appropriations for Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies (CJS) accounts. It also provides an overview of FY2012 appropriations for agencies and bureaus funded as a part of the annual appropriation for CJS. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc463517/
Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies: FY2013 Appropriations
This report will track and describe actions taken by the Administration and Congress to provide FY2013 appropriations for Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies (CJS) accounts. It also provides an overview of FY2012 appropriations for agencies and bureaus funded as a part of the annual appropriation for CJS. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc86616/
Homeland Security: The Presidential Coordination Office
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5889/
Homeland Security: The Presidential Coordination Office
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1706/
Homeland Security: The Presidential Coordination Office
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2742/
Homeland Security: The Presidential Coordination Office
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2743/
Homeland Security: The Presidential Coordination Office
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5888/
Executive Branch Reorganization
This issue brief views reorganization as involving the alteration and relocation of both programs and the administrative structure of the executive branch for reasons of efficiency, economy, and direction. The underlying issue is who reorganizes--Congress or the President--and by what authority and, also, for what purpose? Some other related administrative and management reforms are tracked as well. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs328/
Executive Branch Reorganization
This issue brief views reorganization as involving the alteration and relocation of both programs and the administrative structure of the executive branch for reasons of efficiency, economy, and direction. The underlying issue is who reorganizes--Congress or the President--and by what authority and, also, for what purpose? Some other related administrative and management reforms are tracked as well. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1195/
Executive Branch Reorganization and Management Initiatives
This issue brief views reorganization and management as involving the alteration of the program administrative structure and operations of the executive branch for reasons of efficiency, economy, and direction. The underlying issue is who reorganizes or sets management policy—Congress or the President— and by what authority and, also, for what purpose? digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2726/
Executive Branch Reorganization and Management Initiatives
This issue brief views reorganization and management as involving the alteration of the program administrative structure and operations of the executive branch for reasons of efficiency, economy, and direction. The underlying issue is who reorganizes or sets management policy—Congress or the President— and by what authority and, also, for what purpose? digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2727/
Executive Branch Reorganization and Management Initiatives
This issue brief views reorganization and management as involving the alteration of the program administrative structure and operations of the executive branch for reasons of efficiency, economy, and direction. The underlying issue is who reorganizes or sets management policy—Congress or the President— and by what authority and, also, for what purpose? digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2728/
Executive Branch Reorganization and Management Initiatives
This issue brief views reorganization and management as involving the alteration of the program administrative structure and operations of the executive branch for reasons of efficiency, economy, and direction. The underlying issue is who reorganizes or sets management policy—Congress or the President— and by what authority and, also, for what purpose? digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2729/
Executive Branch Reorganization and Management Initiatives
This issue brief views reorganization and management as involving the alteration of the program administrative structure and operations of the executive branch for reasons of efficiency, economy, and direction. The underlying issue is who reorganizes or sets management policy—Congress or the President— and by what authority and, also, for what purpose? digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2730/
Executive Branch Reorganization and Management Initiatives
This issue brief views reorganization and management as involving the alteration of the program administrative structure and operations of the executive branch for reasons of efficiency, economy, and direction. The underlying issue is who reorganizes or sets management policy—Congress or the President— and by what authority and, also, for what purpose? digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2731/
Executive Branch Reorganization and Management Initiatives
This issue brief views reorganization and management as involving the alteration of the program administrative structure and operations of the executive branch for reasons of efficiency, economy, and direction. The underlying issue is who reorganizes or sets management policy—Congress or the President— and by what authority and, also, for what purpose? digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4573/
Executive Branch Reorganization and Management Initiatives
This issue brief views reorganization and management as involving the alteration of the program administrative structure and operations of the executive branch for reasons of efficiency, economy, and direction. The underlying issue is who reorganizes or sets management policy—Congress or the President— and by what authority and, also, for what purpose? digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4574/
Executive Branch Reorganization and Management Initiatives
This issue brief views reorganization and management as involving the alteration of the program administrative structure and operations of the executive branch for reasons of efficiency, economy, and direction. The underlying issue is who reorganizes or sets management policy—Congress or the President— and by what authority and, also, for what purpose? digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4575/
Executive Branch Reorganization and Management Initiatives
This issue brief views reorganization and management as involving the alteration of the program administrative structure and operations of the executive branch for reasons of efficiency, economy, and direction. The underlying issue is who reorganizes or sets management policy—Congress or the President— and by what authority and, also, for what purpose? digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4576/
Executive Branch Reorganization and Management Initiatives
This issue brief views reorganization and management as involving the alteration of the program administrative structure and operations of the executive branch for reasons of efficiency, economy, and direction. The underlying issue is who reorganizes or sets management policy—Congress or the President— and by what authority and, also, for what purpose? digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4577/
Executive Branch Reorganization and Management Initiatives
This issue brief views reorganization and management as involving the alteration of the program administrative structure and operations of the executive branch for reasons of efficiency, economy, and direction. The underlying issue is who reorganizes or sets management policy—Congress or the President— and by what authority and, also, for what purpose? digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4578/
Executive Branch Reorganization and Management Initiatives
This issue brief views reorganization and management as involving the alteration of the program administrative structure and operations of the executive branch for reasons of efficiency, economy, and direction. The underlying issue is who reorganizes or sets management policy—Congress or the President— and by what authority and, also, for what purpose? digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4579/
Homeland Security Office: Issues and Options
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2779/
Peer Review: OMB's Proposed, Revised, and Final Bulletins
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7779/
State Department and Related Agencies: FY2006 Appropriations and FY2007 Request
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs10132/
Government Performance and Results Act and the Appropriations Process
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs975/
Government Performance and Results Act and the Appropriations Process
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs678/
Government Performance and Results Act: Implementation and Issues of Possible Concern, 106th Congress
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs974/
Government Performance and Results Act: Implementation During 1997 and Issues of Possible Concern, 105th Congress, Second Session
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs658/
Government Performance and Results Act: Proposed Amendments (H.R. 2883)
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs672/
Continuity of Operations (COOP) in the Executive Branch: Issues in the 109th Congress
Spurred in part by occasional warnings of potential terrorist threats in the post- 9/11 era, some policymakers have intensified their focus on continuity of operations (COOP) issues. COOP planning is a segment of federal government contingency planning linked to continuity of government (COG). Together, COOP and COG are designed to ensure survival of a constitutional form of government and the continuity of essential federal functions. This report focuses primarily on executive branch COOP activities. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6223/
Continuity of Operations (COOP) in the Executive Branch: Background and Issues for Congress
This report discusses the background of COOP planning, discusses elements of an effective COOP plan, and reviews the current policies governing COOP planning in the executive branch. The final two sections address issues and policy questions, including, among other matters, the status of agency preparedness, maintaining COOP preparedness, congressional committee oversight of COOP activity, and funding for contingency planning. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4620/
Continuity of Operations (COOP) in the Executive Branch: Background and Issues for Congress
This report discusses the background of COOP planning, discusses elements of an effective COOP plan, and reviews the current policies governing COOP planning in the executive branch. The final two sections address issues and policy questions, including, among other matters, the status of agency preparedness, maintaining COOP preparedness, congressional committee oversight of COOP activity, and funding for contingency planning. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5890/
Polygraph Use by the Department of Energy: Issues for Congress
This report examines how the Department of Energy's (DOE) polygraph testing program has evolved and reviews certain scientific findings with regard to the polygraph's scientific validity. Several issues include whether: DOE's new screening program is focused on an appropriate number of individuals occupying only the most sensitive positions; the program should be expanded in order to adequately safeguard certain classified information; further research into the polygraph's scientific validity is needed; there are possible alternatives to the polygraph; and whether DOE should continue polygraph screening. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc462298/
Congressional Liaison Offices of Selected Federal Agencies
This report is a list of about 200 congressional liaison offices is intended to help congressional offices in placing telephone calls and addressing correspondence to government agencies. In each case, the information was supplied by the agency itself and is current as of the date of publication. Entries are arranged alphabetically in four sections: legislative branch; judicial branch; executive branch; and agencies, boards, and commissions. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc503375/
Federal Spending by Agency and Budget Function, FY2001-FY2005
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs8127/
Federal Government Corporations: An Overview
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs9156/
The FY2007 Budget Request for the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs10153/
Defense Authorization and Appropriations Bills: FY1970-FY2006
This report is a research aid, which lists the DOD authorization bills (Table 1) and appropriations bills (Table 2). This report includes all the pertinent information on the passage of these bills through the legislative process: bill numbers, report numbers, dates reported and passed, recorded vote numbers and vote tallies, dates of passage of the conference reports with their numbers and votes, vetoes, substitutions, dates of final passage, and public law numbers. Table 3 shows real growth or decline in national defense funding for FY1940-FY2009. Table 4 gives a more detailed picture of both regular and supplemental defense appropriations from the 103rd Congress to the present (FY1993-FY2005). Table 5 shows the President’s DOD appropriations budget requests for FY1950-FY2005 vs. final amount enacted. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs10518/
Defense Authorization and Appropriations Bills: FY1970-FY2006
This report is a research aid, which lists the DOD authorization bills (Table 1) and appropriations bills (Table 2). This report includes all the pertinent information on the passage of these bills through the legislative process: bill numbers, report numbers, dates reported and passed, recorded vote numbers and vote tallies, dates of passage of the conference reports with their numbers and votes, vetoes, substitutions, dates of final passage, and public law numbers. Table 3 shows real growth or decline in national defense funding for FY1940-FY2009. Table 4 gives a more detailed picture of both regular and supplemental defense appropriations from the 103rd Congress to the present (FY1993-FY2005). Table 5 shows the President’s DOD appropriations budget requests for FY1950-FY2005 vs. final amount enacted. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs9737/
Defense Authorization and Appropriations Bills: FY1970-FY2010
The passage of the Department of Defense (DOD) authorization and appropriations bills through Congress often does not follow the course laid out in textbooks on legislative procedure. Tracking DOD authorization or appropriations bills can often be confusing and time-consuming. This report is a research aid, which lists the DOD authorization bills (Table 1) and appropriations bills (Table 2) for FY1970-FY2010. This report includes all the pertinent information on the passage of these bills through the legislative process: bill numbers, report numbers, dates reported and passed, recorded vote numbers and vote tallies, dates of passage of the conference reports with their numbers and votes, vetoes, substitutions, dates of final passage, and public law numbers. Key definitions are also included. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc29555/
Congressional Oversight of Agency Public Communications: Implications of Agency New Media Use
This report intends to assist Congress in its oversight of executive branch agencies' public communications. Here, "public communications" refers to agency communications that are directed to the public. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc86606/
The Coalition Provisional Authority (CPA): Origin, Characteristics, and Institutional Authorities
The Coalition Provisional Authority (CPA or “the authority”) was established approximately one month after United States and coalition forces took control of Baghdad in Iraq on April 9, 2003.1 The authority’s mission was “to restore conditions of security and stability, to create conditions in which the Iraqi people can freely determine their own political future, (including by advancing efforts to restore and establish national and local institutions for representative governance) and facilitating economic recovery, sustainable reconstruction and development. This report discusses two views on how the authority was established, reviews selected characteristics of the authority, identifies statutory reporting requirements concerning the authority and the reconstruction of Iraq, and explores several policy issues. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6482/
The National Institutes of Health: An Overview
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs972/
The National Institutes of Health: An Overview
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs656/
Small Business Administration: Overview and Issues
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs657/
Small Business Administration: Overview and Issues
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1193/
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