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 Resource Type: Report
 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
The National Institute of Standards and Technology: An Appropriations Overview
The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has a mandate to increase the competitiveness of U.S. firms and provide the measurement, calibration, and quality assurance techniques that underpin U.S. commerce. Congressional debate has focused on the merits of NIST's external R&D programs directed toward increased private sector commercialization, including the now terminated Advanced Technology Program (ATP) and the Manufacturing Extension Partnership (MEP). This report discusses the funding for such programs. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc26080/
The National Institute of Standards and Technology: An Appropriations Overview
This report is a look at the funding for the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), a laboratory of the Department of Commerce. NIST is mandated to provide technical services to facilitate the competitiveness of U.S. industry. In 2007, the Advanced Technology Program (ATP) was terminated and replaced by the Technology Innovation Program (TIP). However, no funding was appropriated for TIP in the FY2012 appropriations legislation and NIST is "...currently taking the necessary actions for an orderly shutdown." In April 2009, the current President stated his decision to double the budget of key science agencies, including NIST, over the next 10 years. While additional funding has been forthcoming, it remains to be seen how support for internal R&D at NIST will evolve and how this might affect financing of extramural efforts such as MEP. The dispensation of funding for NIST programs may influence the way by which the federal government supports technology development for commercial application. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc83822/
Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board: 109th Congress Proposed Refinements
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Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board: 109th Congress Proposed Refinements
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The Peace Corps: Current Issues
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Federal Program Performance Review: Some Recent Developments
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Congressionally Chartered Nonprofit Organizations ("Title 36 Corporations"): What They Are and How Congress Treats Them
This report discusses a category of congressionally chartered nonprofit organizations that have as their purpose the promotion of patriotic, charitable, educational, and other eleemosynary activities . Title 36 of the United States Code, where such corporate organizations are listed with their charters, was re-codified by law in 1998 (EL 105-225). digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7367/
U.S. National Science Foundation: An Overview
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The Civil Works Program of the Army Corps of Engineers: A Primer
This report outlines the agency’s organization, project development process, civil works appropriations, and evolution of its responsibilities. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7314/
CFTC Reauthorization in 2005
This report provides brief summaries of the issues in the 2005 reauthorization legislation, including (1) the market in security futures, or futures contracts based on single stocks, which were authorized by the CFMA, but trade in much lower volumes than their proponents had hoped, (2) regulation of energy derivatives markets, where some see excessive price volatility and a lack of effective regulation, and (3) the legality of futures-like contracts based on foreign currency prices offered to retail investors. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs8072/
CFTC Reauthorization in 2005
This report provides brief summaries of the issues in the 2005 reauthorization legislation, including (1) the market in security futures, or futures contracts based on single stocks, which were authorized by the CFMA, but trade in much lower volumes than their proponents had hoped, (2) regulation of energy derivatives markets, where some see excessive price volatility and a lack of effective regulation, and (3) the legality of futures-like contracts based on foreign currency prices offered to retail investors. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs8071/
CFTC Reauthorization in the 109th Congress
This report provides brief summaries of the issues in the 2005 reauthorization legislation, including (1) the market in security futures, or futures contracts based on single stocks, which were authorized by the CFMA, but trade in much lower volumes than their proponents had hoped, (2) regulation of energy derivatives markets, where some see excessive price volatility and a lack of effective regulation, and (3) the legality of futures-like contracts based on foreign currency prices offered to retail investors. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs8697/
Defense Authorization and Appropriations Bills: FY1970-FY2011
This report is a research aid, which lists the Department Of Defense authorization bills and appropriations bills for FY1970-FY2011. It includes all the pertinent information on the passage of these bills through the legislative process: bill numbers, report numbers, dates reported and passed, recorded vote numbers and vote tallies, dates of passage of the conference reports with their numbers and votes, vetoes, substitutions, dates of final passage, and public law numbers. Key definitions are also included. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc83858/
Border Security: Key Agencies and Their Missions
After the massive reorganization of federal agencies precipitated by the creation of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), there are now four main federal agencies charged with securing the United States’ borders: the Bureau of Customs and Border Protection (CBP), which patrols the border and conducts immigrations, customs, and agricultural inspections at ports of entry; the Bureau of Immigrations and Customs Enforcement (ICE), which investigates immigrations and customs violations in the interior of the country; the United States Coast Guard, which provides maritime and port security; and the Transportation Security Administration (TSA), which is responsible for securing the nation’s land, rail, and air transportation networks. This report is meant to serve as a primer on the key federal agencies charged with border security; as such it will briefly describe each agency’s role in securing our nation’s borders. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs10146/
United States Fire Administration: An Overview
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Creation of Executive Departments: Highlights from the Legislative History of Modern Precedents
This report describes the principal elements of legislative process used to establish these executive branch entities. Legislative histories of the organic acts of these Cabinet departments are set out in narrative form in the body of the report, and in tabular format in the appendix. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6525/
The National Institute of Standards and Technology: An Overview
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The National Institute of Standards and Technology: An Overview
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The National Institute of Standards and Technology: An Overview
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The National Institute of Standards and Technology: An Overview
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4556/
U.S. National Science Foundation: An Overview
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U.S. National Science Foundation: An Overview
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U.S. National Science Foundation: An Overview
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2718/
U.S. National Science Foundation: An Overview
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2719/
U.S. National Science Foundation: An Overview
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5886/
Food and Drug Administration: Selected Funding and Policy Issues for FY2000
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Food and Drug Administration: Selected Funding and Policy Issues
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The Trade and Development Agency
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs56/
Foreign Policy Agency Reorganization in the 105th Congress
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The National Institute of Standards and Technology: An Overview
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U.S. Geological Survey: Its Mission and Its Future
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The National Institute of Standards and Technology: An Overview
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs653/
The National Institute of Standards and Technology: An Overview
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2716/
The National Institute of Standards and Technology: An Overview
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2717/
U.S. National Science Foundation: An Overview
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2720/
FEMA's Mission: Policy Directives for the Federal Emergency Management Agency
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2745/
The National Transportation Safety Board: Background and Issues for Reauthorization and Congressional Oversight
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4639/
The National Transportation Safety Board: Background and Issues for Reauthorization and Congressional Oversight
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4640/
Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board: 109th Congress Proposed Refinements
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6230/
Creation of Executive Departments: Highlights from the Legislative History of Modern Precedents
This report describes the principal elements of legislative process used to establish these executive branch entities. Legislative histories of the organic acts of these Cabinet departments are set out in narrative form in the body of the report, and in tabular format in the appendix. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2784/
Reauthorization of the Federal Aviation Administration
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4570/
Reauthorization of the Federal Aviation Administration
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4571/
Reauthorization of the Federal Aviation Administration
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4569/
Reauthorization of the Federal Aviation Administration
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4572/
Economic Development Administration: Overview and Issues
The Economic Development Administration (EDA), targeted for elimination or major “reinvention” early in the 104th Congress, gained a new lease on life in the waning days of the 105th. Having been kept alive via appropriations bills since its last authorizing legislation expired in 1982, P.L. 105-393 reauthorized the EDA and its programs for 5 years. On October 27, Congress approved a conference agreement recommending $286.7 million for EDAP and $28 million for S&E, for a totalFY2001 appropriation of$411.9 million for EDA. It became part of the Consolidated Appropriations Act (H.R. 4942, P.L. 106-553) signed into law on December 21, 2000. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2559/
Economic Development Administration: Overview and Issues
The Economic Development Administration (EDA), targeted for elimination or major “reinvention” early in the 104th Congress, gained a new lease on life in the waning days of the 105th. Having been kept alive via appropriations bills since its last authorizing legislation expired in 1982, P.L. 105-393 reauthorized the EDA and its programs for 5 years. On October 27, Congress approved a conference agreement recommending $286.7 million for EDAP and $28 million for S&E, for a totalFY2001 appropriation of$411.9 million for EDA. It became part of the Consolidated Appropriations Act (H.R. 4942, P.L. 106-553) signed into law on December 21, 2000. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2560/
Economic Development Administration: Overview and Issues
The Economic Development Administration (EDA), targeted for elimination or major “reinvention” early in the 104th Congress, gained a new lease on life in the waning days of the 105th. Having been kept alive via appropriations bills since its last authorizing legislation expired in 1982, P.L. 105-393 reauthorized the EDA and its programs for 5 years. On October 27, Congress approved a conference agreement recommending $286.7 million for EDAP and $28 million for S&E, for a totalFY2001 appropriation of$411.9 million for EDA. It became part of the Consolidated Appropriations Act (H.R. 4942, P.L. 106-553) signed into law on December 21, 2000. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2561/
Economic Development Administration: Overview and Issues
The Economic Development Administration (EDA), targeted for elimination or major “reinvention” early in the 104th Congress, gained a new lease on life in the waning days of the 105th. Having been kept alive via appropriations bills since its last authorizing legislation expired in 1982, P.L. 105-393 reauthorized the EDA and its programs for 5 years. On October 27, Congress approved a conference agreement recommending $286.7 million for EDAP and $28 million for S&E, for a totalFY2001 appropriation of$411.9 million for EDA. It became part of the Consolidated Appropriations Act (H.R. 4942, P.L. 106-553) signed into law on December 21, 2000. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2562/
Economic Development Administration: Overview and Issues
The Economic Development Administration (EDA), targeted for elimination or major “reinvention” early in the 104th Congress, gained a new lease on life in the waning days of the 105th. Having been kept alive via appropriations bills since its last authorizing legislation expired in 1982, P.L. 105-393 reauthorized the EDA and its programs for 5 years. On October 27, Congress approved a conference agreement recommending $286.7 million for EDAP and $28 million for S&E, for a totalFY2001 appropriation of$411.9 million for EDA. It became part of the Consolidated Appropriations Act (H.R. 4942, P.L. 106-553) signed into law on December 21, 2000. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4348/
Economic Development Administration: Overview and Issues
The Economic Development Administration (EDA), targeted for elimination or major “reinvention” early in the 104th Congress, gained a new lease on life in the waning days of the 105th. Having been kept alive via appropriations bills since its last authorizing legislation expired in 1982, P.L. 105-393 reauthorized the EDA and its programs for 5 years. On October 27, Congress approved a conference agreement recommending $286.7 million for EDAP and $28 million for S&E, for a totalFY2001 appropriation of$411.9 million for EDA. It became part of the Consolidated Appropriations Act (H.R. 4942, P.L. 106-553) signed into law on December 21, 2000. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4349/