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 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
Environmental Protection: Defense-Related Programs

Environmental Protection: Defense-Related Programs

Date: July 28, 1998
Creator: Bearden, David M
Description: The Department of Defense (DOD) operates six environmental programs that address cleanup of past contamination at military facilities, compliance with environmental laws and regulations that apply to current activities, cleanup at military bases being closed, pollution prevention, natural resource conservation, and environmental technology. In addition, the Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for managing defense nuclear waste generated from the past production of atomic materials used to construct nuclear weapons and for remediating contaminated sites. For FY1999, the Administration has requested a total of $10. 14 billion for DOD and DOE's defense-related environmental activities, which represents about 3.7% of the total request of $271.6 billion for national defense and is roughly 1.6% below the FY1998 funding level of $l0.30 billion.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Environmental Streamlining Provisions in the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century: Status of Implementation

Environmental Streamlining Provisions in the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century: Status of Implementation

Date: May 30, 2003
Creator: Luther, Linda G & Bearden, David M
Description: At the state and local level, many observers have expressed long-standing concerns over delays, duplication of effort, and additional costs frequently associated with the environmental review process for highway projects that must be completed under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA, P.L. 91-190). To address these concerns, the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century (TEA21, P.L. 105-178), enacted in 1998, requires the Federal Highway Administration(FHWA) to streamline the environmental review process for highway projects.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Environmental Streamlining Provisions in the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century: Status of Implementation

Environmental Streamlining Provisions in the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century: Status of Implementation

Date: March 13, 2003
Creator: Bearden, David M & Luther, Linda G
Description: This report describes the environmental documents required for highway projects, discusses the average amount of time to complete this documentation, summarizes the environmental streamlining provisions under TEA-21, and examines administrative and legislative actions taken to implement these requirements.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Environmental Streamlining Provisions in the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century: Status of Implementation

Environmental Streamlining Provisions in the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century: Status of Implementation

Date: February 6, 2003
Creator: Bearden, David M & Luther, Linda G
Description: This report describes the environmental documents required for highway projects, discusses the average amount of time to complete this documentation, summarizes the environmental streamlining provisions under TEA-21, and examines administrative and legislative actions taken to implement these requirements.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Environmental Streamlining Provisions in the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century: Status of Implementation

Environmental Streamlining Provisions in the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century: Status of Implementation

Date: September 30, 2002
Creator: Bearden, David M
Description: At the state and local level, many observers have expressed long-standing concerns over delays, duplication of effort, and additional costs frequently associated with the environmental review process for highway projects that must be completed under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA, P.L. 91-190). To address these concerns, the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century (TEA21, P.L. 105-178), enacted in 1998, requires the Federal Highway Administration(FHWA) to streamline the environmental review process for highway projects.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Environmental Streamlining Provisions in the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century: Status of Implementation

Environmental Streamlining Provisions in the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century: Status of Implementation

Date: August 6, 2002
Creator: Bearden, David M
Description: At the state and local level, many observers have expressed long-standing concerns over delays, duplication of effort, and additional costs frequently associated with the environmental review process for highway projects that must be completed under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA, P.L. 91-190). To address these concerns, the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century (TEA21, P.L. 105-178), enacted in 1998, requires the Federal Highway Administration(FHWA) to streamline the environmental review process for highway projects.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Environmental Streamlining Provisions in the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century: Status of Implementation

Environmental Streamlining Provisions in the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century: Status of Implementation

Date: March 5, 2002
Creator: Bearden, David M
Description: At the state and local level, many observers have expressed long-standing concerns over delays, duplication of effort, and additional costs frequently associated with the environmental review process for highway projects that must be completed under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA, P.L. 91-190). To address these concerns, the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century (TEA21, P.L. 105-178), enacted in 1998, requires the Federal Highway Administration(FHWA) to streamline the environmental review process for highway projects.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Clean Air Standards: The Supreme Court Agrees to Review

Clean Air Standards: The Supreme Court Agrees to Review

Date: December 5, 2000
Creator: Meltz, Robert & McCarthy, James E
Description: In May, 2000, the Supreme Court agreed to review this decision, raising the prospect of a major pronouncement on the non-delegation doctrine, the enforceability of the revised ozone standard, and the role of compliance costs in setting nationwide air quality standards.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The D.C. Circuit Remands the Ozone and Particulate Matter Clean-Air Standards:

The D.C. Circuit Remands the Ozone and Particulate Matter Clean-Air Standards:

Date: June 10, 1999
Creator: Meltz, Robert & McCarthy, James E
Description: On May 14, 1999, in American Trucking Ass'ns v. EPA, a U.S. court of Appeals ruled that deficiencies in EPA's promulgation of new primary and secondary air quality standards required that they be remanded to the agency for further consideration. The decision is controversial, in part because the two-judge majority opinion relied principally on a long-moribund legal doctrine known as the nondelegation doctrine. The decision, if it survives appeal, will thus have implications for all delegations of congressional authority to agencies. In addition, its holding that the revised ozone ambient standard cannot be enforced has sparkled debate. By itself, however, the decision is unlikely to have major short-term effects on the ozone and particulate matter control programs
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
EPA's Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) Program: Highlights of the Final Revised Rule

EPA's Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) Program: Highlights of the Final Revised Rule

Date: July 18, 2000
Creator: Copeland, Claudia
Description: This report discusses the final rule and the key modifications of the August 1999 proposal. The final rule builds on the current TMDL regulatory program and adds details, specific requirements, and deadlines. It retains the basic elements of the 1999 proposal for more comprehensive identification of impaired waters, schedules and minimum elements for TMDLs, and new public participation requirements. At the same time, dropped from the final rule are several provisions that were most controversial in the proposal, including some potentially affecting agriculture and forestry, one that would have required pollutant discharge offsets in some circumstances, and one that would have required states to identify waters threatened but not yet impaired by pollution
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department