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 Decade: 2000-2009
 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
Russian Oil and Gas Challenges
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs10161/
Gasoline Prices: New Legislation and Proposals
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs10165/
Gasoline Prices: New Legislation and Proposals
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs10126/
Gasoline Prices: New Legislation and Proposals
The high price of gasoline was an important consideration during the debate on the Energy Policy Act of 2005, H.R. 6. As prices continued to surge, the continuing crisis renewed attention on some issues that were dropped or compromised in the debate over P.L. 109-58, as well as to a number of initiatives to reduce the impact of high prices on consumers. A large number of factors have combined to put pressure on gasoline prices, including increased world demand for crude oil and limited U.S. refinery capacity to supply gasoline to a growing national economy. Among the issues receiving new attention were vehicle fuel economy standards, leasing on the Outer Continental Shelf, and refinery "revitalization" provisions. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs10318/
Gasoline Prices: New Legislation and Proposals
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Gasoline Prices: Policies and Proposals
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7115/
Energy in 2001: Crisis Again?
This report deals with changes in the national energy picture since the early 1990s, when Congress last dealt at length with energy policy. It reviews the problem areas and discusses differing views on how to deal with the energy situation in the long run. A summary of some current legislative initiatives is also given. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1675/
Energy: Selected Facts and Numbers
Energy supplies and prices are a major economic factor in the United States, and energy markets are volatile and unpredictable. This report represents a statistical view of the supply and consumption of various forms of energy. After an introductory overview of aggregate energy consumption, the report presents detailed analysis of trends and statistics regarding specific energy sources: oil, electricity, natural gas, and coal. A section on trends in energy efficiency is also presented. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs10441/
Energy: Useful Facts and Numbers
Energy supplies and prices are a major economic factor in the United States, and energy markets are volatile and unpredictable. For both these reasons, energy policy is of frequent interest to the Congress. This report presents a statistical view of the supply and consumption of various forms of energy. After an introductory overview of aggregate energy consumption, the report presents detailed analysis of trends and statistics regarding specific energy sources: oil, electricity, natural gas, and coal. A section on trends in energy efficiency is also presented. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs8528/
Energy: Useful Facts and Numbers
Energy supplies and prices are a major economic factor in the United States, and energy markets are volatile and unpredictable. For both these reasons, energy policy is of frequent interest to the Congress. This report presents a statistical view of the supply and consumption of various forms of energy. After an introductory overview of aggregate energy consumption, the report presents detailed analysis of trends and statistics regarding specific energy sources: oil, electricity, natural gas, and coal. A section on trends in energy efficiency is also presented. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs8027/
Energy: Useful Facts and Numbers
Energy supplies and prices are a major economic factor in the United States, and energy markets are volatile and unpredictable. For both these reasons, energy policy is of frequent interest to the Congress. This report presents a statistical view of the supply and consumption of various forms of energy. After an introductory overview of aggregate energy consumption, the report presents detailed analysis of trends and statistics regarding specific energy sources: oil, electricity, natural gas, and coal. A section on trends in energy efficiency is also presented. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs8113/
Energy: Useful Facts and Numbers
Energy supplies and prices are a major economic factor in the United States, and energy markets are volatile and unpredictable. For both these reasons, energy policy is of frequent interest to the Congress. This report presents a statistical view of the supply and consumption of various forms of energy. After an introductory overview of aggregate energy consumption, the report presents detailed analysis of trends and statistics regarding specific energy sources: oil, electricity, natural gas, and coal. A section on trends in energy efficiency is also presented. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4508/
Energy: Useful Facts and Numbers
Energy supplies and prices are a major economic factor in the United States, and energy markets are volatile and unpredictable. For both these reasons, energy policy is of frequent interest to the Congress. This report presents a statistical view of the supply and consumption of various forms of energy. After an introductory overview of aggregate energy consumption, the report presents detailed analysis of trends and statistics regarding specific energy sources: oil, electricity, natural gas, and coal. A section on trends in energy efficiency is also presented. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4506/
Energy: Useful Facts and Numbers
Energy supplies and prices are a major economic factor in the United States, and energy markets are volatile and unpredictable. For both these reasons, energy policy is of frequent interest to the Congress. This report presents a statistical view of the supply and consumption of various forms of energy. After an introductory overview of aggregate energy consumption, the report presents detailed analysis of trends and statistics regarding specific energy sources: oil, electricity, natural gas, and coal. A section on trends in energy efficiency is also presented. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4507/
Energy: Selected Facts and Numbers
Energy supplies and prices are a major economic factor in the United States, and energy markets are volatile and unpredictable. This report represents a statistical view of the supply and consumption of various forms of energy. After an introductory overview of aggregate energy consumption, the report presents detailed analysis of trends and statistics regarding specific energy sources: oil, electricity, natural gas, and coal. A section on trends in energy efficiency is also presented. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs9912/
Energy: Useful Facts and Numbers
Energy supplies and prices are a major economic factor in the United States, and energy markets are volatile and unpredictable. For both these reasons, energy policy is of frequent interest to the Congress. This report presents a statistical view of the supply and consumption of various forms of energy. After an introductory overview of aggregate energy consumption, the report presents detailed analysis of trends and statistics regarding specific energy sources: oil, electricity, natural gas, and coal. A section on trends in energy efficiency is also presented. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7999/
Nuclear Energy Policy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs10128/
Energy Costs and Agriculture
U.S. agriculture is not an especially energy-intensive industry, but energy does account for about 6% of farm production costs. Additionally, farming is a highly mechanized industry and requires timely energy supplies at particular stages of the production cycle in order to achieve optimum yields. A substantial part of energy use by agriculture is indirect —embodied in the chemicals applied and machinery used on farms. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1674/
Nuclear Energy Policy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs10016/
Energy Policy: Conceptual Framework and Continuing Issues
In the spring of 2006, crude oil prices were exceeding $70/barrel (bbl) in response to tight markets and uncertainty over the security of world oil supply. A number of developments have placed additional pressure on world markets, including Hurricanes Katrina and Rita (in late August and late September 2005), the phaseout of the gasoline additive methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) and a renewable fuels mandate, and a continuing high and worldwide demand for oil. Energy policy issues for continuing interest include opening up the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) for leasing; Corporate Average Fuel Economy Standards (CAFE) for passenger vehicles; improving U.S. energy infrastructure, including pipelines and refineries; seeking effective means to promote energy conservation using currently available technologies, and developing new technologies and alternative fuels. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs10448/
Nuclear Energy Policy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs10075/
Energy Efficiency and the Rebound Effect: Does Increasing Efficiency Decrease Demand?
Intuitively it seems obvious to most observers that increasing energy efficiency will ultimately reduce demand for an energy resource such as electricity. Paradoxically, economic theory suggests that this decrease in demand and subsequent decrease in cost of using the resource could cause a rebound in demand. A commonly cited example is an increase in the efficiency of home air conditioning which may reduce the resident’s monetary incentive to conserve. The resident may opt to change the thermostat setting to keep the amount he pays constant, but living at a more comfortable temperature. When actually measured this “Rebound Effect” is generally acknowledged to lower predicted reductions in electricity demand by 10%-40% depending on the device that is made more efficient. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1680/
Russian Oil and Gas Challenges
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs8373/
Nuclear Energy Policy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5877/
Nuclear Energy Policy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5876/
Russian Oil and Gas Challenges
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs8654/
Nuclear Energy Policy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs8018/
Nuclear Energy Policy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2665/
Nuclear Energy Policy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2662/
Nuclear Energy Policy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2667/
Nuclear Energy Policy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2668/
Nuclear Energy Policy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2664/
Nuclear Energy Policy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2666/
Nuclear Energy Policy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2663/
Nuclear Energy Policy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6794/
Nuclear Energy Policy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6550/
Nuclear Energy Policy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6637/
Nuclear Energy Policy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6636/
Nuclear Energy Policy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1664/
Nuclear Energy Policy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1663/
Nuclear Energy Policy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4488/
Nuclear Energy Policy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4489/
Nuclear Energy Policy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4492/
Nuclear Energy Policy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4491/
Nuclear Energy Policy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4490/
Nuclear Energy Policy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4494/
Nuclear Energy Policy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4493/
Energy Policy: The Continuing Debate
On April 11, 2003, the House passed comprehensive energy legislation, H.R. 6 (247-175).Action on comprehensive energy legislation is in progress in the Senate. The Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee began markup of a comprehensive energy bill on April 7, 2003, agreeing by week’s end to provisions regarding hydrogen, hydroelectric relicensing, nuclear and renewable energy. On April 11, 2003, Chairman Domenici pulled a controversial section on climate change from the bill and indicated it would be addressed later. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs10031/
Energy Policy: The Continuing Debate and Omnibus Energy Legislation
The history of omnibus energy legislation in the 108th Congress has been protracted. The House passed the conference version of H.R. 6 on November 18, 2003. On November 21, a cloture motion to limit debate in the Senate on the H.R. 6 conference report failed (57-40). Efforts to bring the bill back to the Senate floor early in the second session were unsuccessful. Some argued that any major changes to the legislation would not be viable because of the careful regional and political compromises that were reached to get a bill out of conference and through the House. The closest consensus was that the cost of the bill had to be reduced. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs10079/
Gasoline Prices: New Legislation and Proposals
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs8751/
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