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 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
Small Business Disaster Assistance: Responding to the Terrorist Attacks
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Electronic Congress: Proposals and Issues
The events of September 11, 2001, and the subsequent anthrax incidents have prompted some observers to suggest creating a capability for a virtual or electronic Congress (e-Congress) that could function in the event of an emergency. Currently, it is unclear exactly how an e-Congress would be constituted and operated; however, a proposal (H.R. 3481) has been introduced to require the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to investigate the feasibility and costs of implementing a computer system for remote voting and communication for Congress to ensure business continuity for congressional operations. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2307/
Electronic Congress: Proposals and Issues
The events of September 11, 2001, and the subsequent anthrax incidents have prompted some observers to suggest creating a capability for a virtual or electronic Congress (e-Congress) that could function in the event of an emergency. Currently, it is unclear exactly how an e-Congress would be constituted and operated; however, a proposal (H.R. 3481) has been introduced to require the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to investigate the feasibility and costs of implementing a computer system for remote voting and communication for Congress to ensure business continuity for congressional operations. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4039/
Emergency Electronic Communications in Congress: Proposals and Issues
The events of September 11, 2001, and the subsequent anthrax incidents have prompted some observers to suggest creating an emergency electronic communications system for Congress to ensure continuity of its operations. On July 25, 2003, Representative James R. Langevin introduced H.R. 2948. The bill would direct the Comptroller General of the United States to enter into arrangements with the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) and the Librarian of Congress for conducting a study on the feasibility and costs of implementing such a system for Congress to use during an emergency. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4040/
Terrorism and the Military's Role in Domestic Crisis Management: Background and Issues for Congress
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Terrorism and the Military's Role in Domestic Crisis Management: Background and Issues for Congress
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State and Local Preparedness for Terrorism: Policy Issues and Options
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State and Local Preparedness for Terrorism: Policy Issues and Options
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State and Local Preparedness for Terrorism: Selected Policy Issues
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Bioterrorism: Summary of a CRS/National Health Policy Forum Seminar on Federal, State, and Local Public Health Preparedness
The September 11th attack and subsequent intentional release of anthrax spores via the U.S. postal system have focused policymakers’ attention on the preparedness and response capability of the nation’s public health system. The anthrax attacks put a tremendous strain on the U. S. public health infrastructure, an infrastructure that many experts argue has been weakened by years of neglect and under-funding. To better understand the preparedness gaps that exist, as well as the disparate functions and agencies that define public health in this country, the Congressional Research Service (CRS), in conjunction with George Washington University’s National Health Policy Forum (NHPF), convened a seminar on October 26, 2001, entitled, The U.S. Health Care System: Are State and Local Officials Prepared for Bioterrorism? How Should the Federal Government Assist? digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1592/
An Overview of the U.S. Public Health System in the Context of Bioterrorism
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An Overview of the U.S. Public Health System in the Context of Emergency Preparedness
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Homeland Security Advisory System: Possible Issues for Congressional Oversight
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Homeland Security Advisory System: Possible Issues for Congressional Oversight
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Federal Counter-Terrorism Training: Issues for Congressional Oversight
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Homeland Security: Establishment and Implementation of Northern Command
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Homeland Security: Establishment and Implementation of the United States Northern Command
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The National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program: Preparing for the "Big One"
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Farm Disaster Assistance: USDA Programs and Recent Legislative Action
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FEMA and Disaster Relief
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Disaster Mitigation Assistance Bills in the 106th Congress: Comparison of Provisions
The Administration initiative to shift federal emergency management policy away from a "response and recovery" emphasis has generated little congressional controversy, although some have raised concerns about the cost effectiveness of implementing a mitigation strategy. Greater attention, it is generally argued, should be given to mitigation (loss reduction) efforts before disasters occur in order to reduce future losses. Legislation (H.R. 707, S. 1691) pending before the 106th Congress would amend the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (the Stafford Act) which authorizes federal assistance when the President declares that a catastrophe has overwhelmed state and local resources. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1166/
Terrorism: Section by Section Analysis of the USA PATRIOT Act
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Terrorism Preparedness: A Catalog of Federal Assistance Programs
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Terrorism Preparedness: Catalog of Selected Federal Assistance Programs
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Disaster Relief and Response: FY2003 Supplemental Appropriations
On July 7, 2003, President Bush submitted a second supplemental appropriations request to Congress for FY2003. The request seeks $1.889 billion for three disaster relief activities: $289 million for wildfire suppression and rehabilitation carried out by the Departments of Agriculture and the Interior, $1.550 billion for disaster relief administered by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), and $50 million for the investigation and recovery associated with the Space Shuttle Columbia disaster. For the most part, Members of Congress evince support for the disaster relief funding request; however, some debate has occurred on other funding sought, notably funding for AmeriCorps grants. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4423/
Disaster Relief and Response: FY2003 Supplemental Appropriations
On July 7, 2003, President Bush submitted a second supplemental appropriations request to Congress for FY2003. The request seeks $1.889 billion for three disaster relief activities: $289 million for wildfire suppression and rehabilitation carried out by the Departments of Agriculture and the Interior, $1.550 billion for disaster relief administered by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), and $50 million for the investigation and recovery associated with the Space Shuttle Columbia disaster. For the most part, Members of Congress evince support for the disaster relief funding request; however, some debate has occurred on other funding sought, notably funding for AmeriCorps grants. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4424/
Disaster Relief and Response: FY2003 Supplemental Appropriations
On July 25, 2003, the House approved a supplemental appropriations measure (H.R. 2859) that provides $983.6 million for the Disaster Relief Fund administered by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) within the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). During debate Members rejected an amendment to require a rescission from discretionary accounts to compensate for the supplemental. On July 31 the Senate approved the House-passed version of H.R. 2859. The President signed the Emergency Supplemental Appropriation for Disaster Relief Act of 2003 (P.L. 108-69) on August 8, 2003. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4425/
Disaster Relief and Response: FY2003 Supplemental Appropriations
Federal departments and agencies are authorized to undertake a range of emergency management activities, including disaster relief and response efforts. The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has primary responsibility, but other departments and agencies provide grants and loans to disaster victims and reimburse state and local governments overwhelmed by costs associated with clearing debris and rebuilding facilities, among other forms of assistance. FY2003 supplemental funding for these activities has been the issue of debate. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4426/
Homeland Security: Federal Assistance Funding and Business Opportunities
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Homeland Security: Federal Assistance Funding and Business Opportunities
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First Responder Grant Formulas: The 9/11 Commission Recommendation and Other Options for Congressional Action
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Emergency Communications: The Emergency Alert System (EAS) and All-Hazard Warnings
The Emergency Alert System (EAS) is one of several federally managed warning systems. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) jointly administers EAS with the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), in cooperation with the National Weather Service (NWS), an organization within the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The NOAA/NWS weather radio system has been upgraded to an all-hazard warning capability. This report summarizes the technology and administration of EAS and the NOAA/NWS all-hazard network, and some of the key proposals for change. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5868/
Emergency Communications: The Emergency Alert System (EAS) and All-Hazard Warnings
The Emergency Alert System (EAS) is one of several federally managed warning systems. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) jointly administers EAS with the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), in cooperation with the National Weather Service (NWS), an organization within the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The NOAA/NWS weather radio system has been upgraded to an all-hazard warning capability. This report summarizes the technology and administration of EAS and the NOAA/NWS all-hazard network, and some of the key proposals for change digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5869/
Indian Ocean Earthquake and Tsunami: Humanitarian Assistance and Relief Operations
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Tsunamis: Monitoring, Detection, and Early Warning Systems
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Disaster Mitigation Bills in the 106th Congress: H.R. 707, S. 1691 Compared
The Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act authorizes the President to declare that an emergency or major disaster exists that overwhelms state and local resources. Legislation before the 106th Congress (H.R. 707 and S. 1691) would, among other matters, amend the Act to: (1) fund hazard mitigation projects designed to reduce future disaster losses; (2) add conditions to assistance; and (3) consolidate provisions governing the distribution of aid to disaster victims. This report compares provisions of the two bills, and will be updated as legislative action occurs. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs957/
Urban Search and Rescue Task Forces: Facts and Issues
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Farm Disaster Assistance
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Farm Disaster Assistance
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Farm Disaster Assistance
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Assistance to Firefighters Program
The Assistance to Firefighters Program,1 also known as the FIRE Act grant program, was established by Title XVII of the FY2001 National Defense Authorization Act (P.L. 106-398). Currently administered by the United States Fire Administration (USFA) within the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), the program provides federal grants directly to local fire departments to help address a variety of equipment, training, and other firefighter-related needs. The FY2004 proposal would place the fire grant program within the Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS) Office for Domestic Preparedness, located within the Border and Transportation Security Directorate. Under this proposal, the Assistance to Firefighters Program would be removed from the USFA, which will remain in the DHS Directorate of Emergency Preparedness and Response. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4430/
Auburn Dam on the American River: Fact Sheet
For more than 30 years, Congress has debated constructing a dam on the American River near Auburn, California. The Army Corps of Engineers recently identified three alternatives for flood control, with the Division office's preferred plan calling for construction of a 508-foot-high detention dam. Currently, two bills address the issue: H.R. 3270 supports construction of the dam, while H.R. 2951 opposes construction of any structure on the North Fork of the American River. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs314/
FEMA's Mission: Policy Directives for the Federal Emergency Management Agency
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Department of Homeland Security: State and Local Preparedness Issues
The Homeland Security Act of 2002 (P.L. 107-296) makes the new Department of Homeland Security (DHS) responsible for providing assistance to state and local governments to ensure adequate preparedness for all disasters, including terrorist attacks. Several federal entities with functions relating to state and local preparedness, ranging from entire independent agencies to units of agencies and departments, will be transferred to the new department. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2782/
Department of Homeland Security: State and Local Preparedness Issues
The Homeland Security Act of 2002 (P.L. 107-296) makes the new Department of Homeland Security (DHS) responsible for providing assistance to state and local governments to ensure adequate preparedness for all disasters, including terrorist attacks. Several federal entities with functions relating to state and local preparedness, ranging from entire independent agencies to units of agencies and departments, will be transferred to the new department. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4600/
Department of Homeland Security: State and Local Preparedness Issues
The Homeland Security Act of 2002 (P.L. 107-296) makes the new Department of Homeland Security (DHS) responsible for providing assistance to state and local governments to ensure adequate preparedness for all disasters, including terrorist attacks. Several federal entities with functions relating to state and local preparedness, ranging from entire independent agencies to units of agencies and departments, will be transferred to the new department. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4601/
The Department of Homeland Security: State and Local Preparedness Issues
Both H.R. 5005 and S. 2452 propose a new Department of Homeland Security (DHS), which would have a number of responsibilities relating to state and local preparedness for potential terrorist attacks. This report discusses selected state and local preparedness issues that specifically pertain to the proposed Emergency Preparedness and Response Division of the new department.1 The report does not, however, discuss certain issues, such as the impact of integrating selected offices from the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) into a new DHS,2 and the degree of authority the DHS would need to effectively evaluate state and local assistance programs. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2783/
Proposed Transfer of FEMA to the Department of Homeland Security
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Transfer of FEMA to the Department of Homeland Security: Issues for Congressional Oversight
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Homeland Security Extramural R&D Funding Opportunities in Federal Agencies
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