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 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
Defense Procurement: Full Funding Policy - Background, Issues, and Options for Congress

Defense Procurement: Full Funding Policy - Background, Issues, and Options for Congress

Date: July 26, 2006
Creator: O'Rourke, Ronald & Daggett, Stephen
Description: The full funding policy is a federal budgeting rule imposed on DOD by Congress in the 1950s that requires the entire procurement cost of a weapon or piece of military equipment to be funded in the year in which the item is procured. Although technical in nature, the policy relates to Congress’ power of the purse and its responsibility for conducting oversight of Department of Defense (DOD) programs. Support for the policy has been periodically reaffirmed over the years by Congress, the Government Accountability Office, and DOD.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Defense Procurement: Full Funding Policy - Background, Issues, and Options for Congress

Defense Procurement: Full Funding Policy - Background, Issues, and Options for Congress

Date: July 26, 2006
Creator: O'Rourke, Ronald & Daggett, Stephen
Description: The full funding policy is a federal budgeting rule imposed on DOD by Congress in the 1950s that requires the entire procurement cost of a weapon or piece of military equipment to be funded in the year in which the item is procured. Although technical in nature, the policy relates to Congress’ power of the purse and its responsibility for conducting oversight of Department of Defense (DOD) programs. Support for the policy has been periodically reaffirmed over the years by Congress, the Government Accountability Office, and DOD.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Defense Procurement: Full Funding Policy -- Background, Issues, and Options for Congress

Defense Procurement: Full Funding Policy -- Background, Issues, and Options for Congress

Date: June 20, 2006
Creator: O'Rourke, Ronald & Daggett, Stephen
Description: The full funding policy is a federal budgeting rule imposed on the Department of Defense (DOD) by Congress in the 1950s that requires the entire procurement cost of a weapon or piece of military equipment to be funded in the year in which the item is procured. This policy relates to Congress's power of the purse and its responsibility for conducting oversight of DOD programs. In recent years, some DOD weapons--specifically, certain Navy ships--have not been procured in accordance with the above policy. The DOD is requesting that certain procurements take place without keeping with the above and precedented policy. The full funding policy helps keeps DOD procurements streamlined so that they can be easily followed and recorded; deviations from this policy would limit and complicate Congress's oversight of DOD procedures.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Defense Procurement: Full Funding Policy -- Background, Issues, and Options for Congress

Defense Procurement: Full Funding Policy -- Background, Issues, and Options for Congress

Date: July 26, 2006
Creator: O'Rourke, Ronald & Daggett, Stephen
Description: The full funding policy is a federal budgeting rule imposed on the Department of Defense (DOD) by Congress in the 1950s that requires the entire procurement cost of a weapon or piece of military equipment to be funded in the year in which the item is procured. A principal effect of the full funding policy is to prevent the use of incremental funding, under which the cost of a weapon is divided into two or more annual portions. Opponents believed incremental funding could make the total procurement costs of weapons and equipment more difficult for Congress to understand and track. Congress has several options for responding to recent proposals for procuring DOD ships and aircraft with funding mechanisms that do not conform to the full funding policy. These options could have the effect of terminating, modifying, maintaining, or strengthening the full funding policy.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Defense Procurement: Full Funding Policy - Background, Issues, and Options for Congress

Defense Procurement: Full Funding Policy - Background, Issues, and Options for Congress

Date: May 25, 2005
Creator: O'Rourke, Ronald & Daggett, Stephen
Description: The full funding policy is a federal budgeting rule imposed on DOD by Congress in the 1950s that requires the entire procurement cost of a weapon or piece of military equipment to be funded in the year in which the item is procured. Although technical in nature, the policy relates to Congress’ power of the purse and its responsibility for conducting oversight of Department of Defense (DOD) programs. Support for the policy has been periodically reaffirmed over the years by Congress, the Government Accountability Office, and DOD.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Defense Procurement: Full Funding Policy - Background, Issues, and Options for Congress

Defense Procurement: Full Funding Policy - Background, Issues, and Options for Congress

Date: June 28, 2005
Creator: O'Rourke, Ronald & Daggett, Stephen
Description: The full funding policy is a federal budgeting rule imposed on DOD by Congress in the 1950s that requires the entire procurement cost of a weapon or piece of military equipment to be funded in the year in which the item is procured. Although technical in nature, the policy relates to Congress’ power of the purse and its responsibility for conducting oversight of Department of Defense (DOD) programs. Support for the policy has been periodically reaffirmed over the years by Congress, the Government Accountability Office, and DOD.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Allied Burdensharing in Transition: Status and Implications for the United States

Allied Burdensharing in Transition: Status and Implications for the United States

Date: October 25, 1991
Creator: Pagliano, Gary J
Description: This report describes recent changes in U.S. burdensharing relationships with NATO, Japan and South Korea and, in the process, identifies some implications for U.S. foreign policy.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Evolutionary Acquisition and Spiral Development in DOD Programs: Policy Issues for Congress

Evolutionary Acquisition and Spiral Development in DOD Programs: Policy Issues for Congress

Date: May 17, 2006
Creator: Pagliano, Gary J & O'Rourke, Ronald
Description: The Department of Defense (DOD) in 2001 adopted a new approach for developing major weapon systems, called evolutionary acquisition with spiral development (EA/SD), as its preferred standard. EA/SD is intended to make DOD’s acquisition system more responsive to rapid changes in military needs. EA/SD poses potentially important challenges for Congress in carrying out its legislative functions, particularly committing to and effectively overseeing DOD weapon acquisition programs.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Department of Homeland Security Appropriations: A Summary of Congressional Action for FY2013

Department of Homeland Security Appropriations: A Summary of Congressional Action for FY2013

Date: October 1, 2012
Creator: Painter, William L.
Description: The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) appropriations bill includes funding for all components and functions of the Department of Homeland Security. This report looks at the requested FY2013 budget for these bills, and programs that the budget would fund.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Department of Homeland Security: FY2013 Appropriations

Department of Homeland Security: FY2013 Appropriations

Date: October 1, 2012
Creator: Painter, William L.
Description: This report describes the FY2013 appropriations for the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). The Administration requested $39.510 billion in adjusted net discretionary budget authority for DHS for FY2013, as part of an overall budget of $59.501 billion (including fees, trust funds, and other funding that is not appropriated or does not score against the budget caps). The request amounts to a $90 million, or a 0.2%, decrease from the $39.600 billion enacted for FY2012 through the consolidated appropriations act (P.L. 112-174).
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department