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 Resource Type: Report
 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
Defense Acquisition Reform: Status and Current Issues

Defense Acquisition Reform: Status and Current Issues

Date: January 9, 2002
Creator: Grasso, Valerie Bailey
Description: The end of the Cold War and its impact on defense spending has created a strong need to reform Department of Defense’s (DOD) acquisition system. With procurement spending down, DOD expects to depend on savings from acquisition reform to help finance future force modernization. Policymakers believe that DOD should use more commercial products because, in many instances, they cost less and their quality is comparable to products built according to DOD military specifications. Many such reform proposals are based on recognition that DOD regulatory barriers and a Cold War acquisition “culture” have inhibited the introduction of commercial products.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Defense Acquisition Reform: Status and Current Issues

Defense Acquisition Reform: Status and Current Issues

Date: September 5, 2002
Creator: Grasso, Valerie Bailey
Description: The end of the Cold War and its impact on defense spending has created a strong need to reform Department of Defense’s (DOD) acquisition system. With procurement spending down, DOD expects to depend on savings from acquisition reform to help finance future force modernization. Policymakers believe that DOD should use more commercial products because, in many instances, they cost less and their quality is comparable to products built according to DOD military specifications. Many such reform proposals are based on recognition that DOD regulatory barriers and a Cold War acquisition “culture” have inhibited the introduction of commercial products.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Defense Acquisition Reform: Status and Current Issues

Defense Acquisition Reform: Status and Current Issues

Date: October 2, 2002
Creator: Grasso, Valerie Bailey
Description: The end of the Cold War and its impact on defense spending has created a strong need to reform Department of Defense’s (DOD) acquisition system. With procurement spending down, DOD expects to depend on savings from acquisition reform to help finance future force modernization. Policymakers believe that DOD should use more commercial products because, in many instances, they cost less and their quality is comparable to products built according to DOD military specifications. Many such reform proposals are based on recognition that DOD regulatory barriers and a Cold War acquisition “culture” have inhibited the introduction of commercial products.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Defense Acquisition Reform: Status and Current Issues

Defense Acquisition Reform: Status and Current Issues

Date: November 20, 2002
Creator: Grasso, Valerie Bailey
Description: The end of the Cold War and its impact on defense spending has created a strong need to reform Department of Defense’s (DOD) acquisition system. With procurement spending down, DOD expects to depend on savings from acquisition reform to help finance future force modernization. Policymakers believe that DOD should use more commercial products because, in many instances, they cost less and their quality is comparable to products built according to DOD military specifications. Many such reform proposals are based on recognition that DOD regulatory barriers and a Cold War acquisition “culture” have inhibited the introduction of commercial products.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Defense Acquisition Reform: Status and Current Issues

Defense Acquisition Reform: Status and Current Issues

Date: June 24, 2002
Creator: Grasso, Valerie Bailey
Description: The end of the Cold War and its impact on defense spending has created a strong need to reform Department of Defense’s (DOD) acquisition system. With procurement spending down, DOD expects to depend on savings from acquisition reform to help finance future force modernization. Policymakers believe that DOD should use more commercial products because, in many instances, they cost less and their quality is comparable to products built according to DOD military specifications. Many such reform proposals are based on recognition that DOD regulatory barriers and a Cold War acquisition “culture” have inhibited the introduction of commercial products.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Defense Acquisition Reform: Status and Current Issues

Defense Acquisition Reform: Status and Current Issues

Date: January 16, 2003
Creator: Grasso, Valerie Bailey
Description: The end of the Cold War and its impact on defense spending has created a strong need to reform Department of Defense’s (DOD) acquisition system. With procurement spending down, DOD expects to depend on savings from acquisition reform to help finance future force modernization. Policymakers believe that DOD should use more commercial products because, in many instances, they cost less and their quality is comparable to products built according to DOD military specifications. Many such reform proposals are based on recognition that DOD regulatory barriers and a Cold War acquisition “culture” have inhibited the introduction of commercial products.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Defense Acquisition Reform: Status and Current Issues

Defense Acquisition Reform: Status and Current Issues

Date: March 4, 2003
Creator: Grasso, Valerie Bailey
Description: The end of the Cold War and its impact on defense spending has created a strong need to reform Department of Defense’s (DOD) acquisition system. With procurement spending down, DOD expects to depend on savings from acquisition reform to help finance future force modernization. Policymakers believe that DOD should use more commercial products because, in many instances, they cost less and their quality is comparable to products built according to DOD military specifications. Many such reform proposals are based on recognition that DOD regulatory barriers and a Cold War acquisition “culture” have inhibited the introduction of commercial products.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Defense Acquisition Reform: Status and Current Issues

Defense Acquisition Reform: Status and Current Issues

Date: April 8, 2003
Creator: Grasso, Valerie Bailey
Description: The end of the Cold War and its impact on defense spending has created a strong need to reform Department of Defense’s (DOD) acquisition system. With procurement spending down, DOD expects to depend on savings from acquisition reform to help finance future force modernization. Policymakers believe that DOD should use more commercial products because, in many instances, they cost less and their quality is comparable to products built according to DOD military specifications. Many such reform proposals are based on recognition that DOD regulatory barriers and a Cold War acquisition “culture” have inhibited the introduction of commercial products.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Defense Acquisition Reform: Status and Current Issues

Defense Acquisition Reform: Status and Current Issues

Date: May 16, 2003
Creator: Grasso, Valerie Bailey
Description: The end of the Cold War and its impact on defense spending has created a strong need to reform Department of Defense’s (DOD) acquisition system. With procurement spending down, DOD expects to depend on savings from acquisition reform to help finance future force modernization. Policymakers believe that DOD should use more commercial products because, in many instances, they cost less and their quality is comparable to products built according to DOD military specifications. Many such reform proposals are based on recognition that DOD regulatory barriers and a Cold War acquisition “culture” have inhibited the introduction of commercial products.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Defense Acquisition: Use of Lead System Integrators (LSIs) -- Background, Oversight Issues, and Options for Congress

Defense Acquisition: Use of Lead System Integrators (LSIs) -- Background, Oversight Issues, and Options for Congress

Date: June 6, 2008
Creator: Grasso, Valerie Bailey
Description: Some in Congress have expressed concern about the government's use of private-sector lead system integrators (LSIs) for executing large, complex, defense-related acquisition programs. LSIs are large, prime contractors hired to manage such programs. Supporters of the LSI concept argue that it is needed to execute such complex acquisition efforts, and can promote better technical oversight and innovation.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department