You limited your search to:

 Decade: 2000-2009
 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
State and Local Homeland Security: Unresolved Issues for the 109th Congress
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs9383/
Immigration: Terrorist Grounds for Exclusion and Removal of Aliens
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs9548/
Drug Control: International Policy and Approaches
Over the past decade, worldwide production of illicit drugs has risen dramatically: opium and marijuana production has roughly doubled and coca production tripled. Street prices of cocaine and heroin have fallen significantly in the past 20 years, reflecting increased availability. Despite apparent national political resolve to deal with the drug problem, inherent contradictions regularly appear between U.S. anti-drug policy and other national policy goals and concerns. The mix of competing domestic and international pressures and priorities has produced an ongoing series of disputes within and between the legislative and executive branches concerning U.S. international drug policy. One contentious issue has been the Congressionally-mandated certification process, an instrument designed to induce specified drug-exporting countries to prioritize or pay more attention to the fight against narcotics businesses. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs8555/
Terrorism and National Security: Issues and Trends
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs8549/
Trafficking in Persons: The U.S. and International Response
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs9751/
Enemy Combatant Detainees: Habeas Corpus Challenges in Federal Court
There have been inconsistent opinions in the District Court for the District of Columbia as to whether detainees who are suspected of connections to terrorist actions have any enforceable rights to challenge their treatment and detention. This report describes issues surrounding the writ of habeas corpus as it relates to detaining and imprisonment in matters of counterterrorism. This report also includes several legal cases and pieces of legislation in regards to this issue. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs10350/
H.R. 5825 (109th Congress): "Electronic Surveillance Modernization Act"
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs9522/
International Small Arms and Light Weapons Transfers: U.S. Policy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs9531/
European Approaches to Homeland Security and Counterterrorism
This report examines homeland security and counterterrorist measures in six selected European countries: Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and the United Kingdom. None of these European countries currently has a single ministry or department equivalent to the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. In most of these countries, responsibility for different aspects of homeland security and counterterrorism is scattered across several ministries or different levels of government. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs9493/
Enemy Combatant Detainees:
In Rasul v. Bush, a divided Supreme Court declared that “a state of war is not a blank check for the president” and ruled that persons deemed “enemy combatants” have the right to challenge their detention before a judge or other “neutral decision-maker.” This report provides an overview of the CSRT procedures, summarizes court cases related to the detentions and the use of military commissions, and summarizes the Detainee Treatment Act, analyzing how it might affect detainee-related litigation in federal court. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs9899/
Selected Procedural Safeguards in Federal, Military, and International Courts
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs9897/
Civil Charges in Corporate Scandals
This report lists civil suites filled by federal regulatory agencies charging individuals and corporations with violations related to these scandals. The list is limited to corporations and their offices or employees that fit within the Enron pattern. That is, these are cases that display one or more of the following: irregular accounting and auditing, management self-dealing, conflicts of interests between firms and financial advisors (or Wall Street firms and their costumers), and manipulation or abusive trading in energy markets. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs9087/
Treatment of "Battlefield Detainees" in the War on Terrorism
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs8644/
Homeland Security: Protecting Airliners from Terrorist Missiles
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs8580/
Homeland Security: Protecting Airliners from Terrorist Missiles
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs8539/
NASA's Space Shuttle Program: The Columbia Tragedy, the Discovery Mission, and the Future of the Shuttle
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs8700/
Extraterritorial Application of American Criminal Law
Crime is ordinarily proscribed, tried and punished according to the laws on the place where it occurs. American criminal law applies beyond the geographical confines of the United States, however, under some limited circumstances. The federal exceptions to the general rule usually involve crimes like drug trafficking, terrorism, or crimes committed aboard a ship or airplane. State prosecution for overseas misconduct is limited almost exclusively to multijurisdictional crimes, i.e., crimes where some elements of the offense are committed within the state and others are committed abroad. The Constitution, Congress, and state law define the circumstances under which American criminal law may be used against crimes occurring, in whole or in part, outside the United States digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs9325/
Selected Procedural Safeguards in Federal, Military, and International Courts
This report provides a brief overview of procedural rules applicable in selected historical and contemporary tribunals for the trials of war crimes suspects. The chart that follows compares selected procedural safeguards employed in criminal trials in federal criminal court with parallel protective measures in military general courts-martial, international military tribunals used after World War II, including the International Military Tribunal (IMT or "Nuremberg Tribunal"), and the International Criminal Courts for the former Yugoslavis (ICTY) and Rwanda (ICTR). digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs10472/
Trafficking in Persons: The U.S. and International Response
Trafficking in people for prostitution and forced labor is one of the most prolific areas of international criminal activity and is of significant concern to the United States and the international community. The overwhelming majority of those trafficked are women and children. In December 2005, Congress adopted the Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act of 2005. The State Department, on June 5, 2006, issued a mandate that categorized countries into four groups according to the efforts they were making to combat trafficking. Those countries (Tier Three) that do not cooperate in the fight against trafficking have been made subject to U.S. sanctions since 2003. In the second session of the 109th Congress, both chambers are expected to continue to address the human trafficking issue as part of their authorization, appropriations, and oversight activities. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs10488/
The False Claims Act, the Allison Engine Decision, and Possible Effects on Health Care Fraud Enforcement
The False Claims Act (FCA), an important tool for combating fraud against the U.S. government, generally provides that a person who knowingly submits, or causes to be submitted, a false or fraudulent claim for payment to the U.S. government may be subject to civil penalties and damages. This report provides an overview of the FCA and the Allison Engine decision, analyzes how this decision could affect certain FCA health care claims, and discusses the proposed False Claims Correction Acts (S. 2041 and H.R. 4854), which, if enacted, could limit the application of the Allison Engine decision. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs10818/
Cybercrime: The Council of Europe Convention
Forty-three countries, including the United States, have signed the Council of Europe’s Convention on Cybercrime of November 2001. The U.S. Senate ratified the Convention on August 3, 2006. The Convention seeks to better combat cybercrime by harmonizing national laws, improving investigative abilities, and boosting international cooperation. Supporters argue that the Convention will enhance deterrence, while critics counter it will have little effect without participation by countries in which cybercriminals operate freely. Others warn it will endanger privacy and civil liberties. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs10144/
Terrorism and National Security: Issues and Trends
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs10145/
Navy Role in Global War on Terrorism (GWOT) -- Background and Issues for Congress
The Navy for several years has carried out a variety of activities related to what the Administration refers to as the Global War on Terrorism (GWOT). The Navy states that as of February 2008, more than 11,300 Navy sailors (including Individual Augmentees) were ashore supporting ground forces in the U.S. Central Command region (including Iraq and Afghanistan). The Navy's role in the GWOT raises several potential oversight issues for Congress. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs10659/
Navy Role in Global War on Terrorism (GWOT) -- Background and Issues for Congress
The Navy for several years has carried out a variety of activities related to what the Administration refers to as the Global War on Terrorism (GWOT). The Navy states that as of February 2008, more than 11,300 Navy sailors (including Individual Augmentees) were ashore supporting ground forces in the U.S. Central Command region (including Iraq and Afghanistan). The Navy's role in the GWOT raises several potential oversight issues for Congress. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs10660/
Small-Scale Terrorist Attacks Using Chemical and Biological Agents: An Assessment Framework and Preliminary Comparisons
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs10059/
The Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act: An Overview of the Statutory Framework and Recent Judicial Decisions
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs8022/
United States Sentencing Guidelines and the Supreme Court: Booker, Fanfan, Blakely Apprendi, and Mistretta
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7277/
Race-Based Civil Dentention for Security Purposes
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6995/
"Terrorism" and Related Terms in Statute and Regulation: Selected Language
Congress is considering revised definitions of “terrorism” and related terms in the context of the proposed “Anti-Terrorism Act of 2001.” While the proposed definitions relate to criminal law and immigration law, hundreds of other federal statutes and regulations already define “terrorism” and related terms in a variety of other contexts. However, these statutes and regulations ultimately refer to an extremely small set of statutory definitions, current criminal law and immigration definitions being among them. This report provides the current text of these fundamental definitions. The report will be updated as action on new antiterrorism law proceeds. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6992/
Detainees at Guantànamo Bay
After the U.S. Supreme Court held that U.S. courts have jurisdiction to hear legal challenges on behalf of more than 500 persons detained at the U.S. Naval Station in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba in connection with the war against terrorism, the Pentagon established administrative hearings, called “Combatant Status Review Tribunals” (CSRTs), to allow the detainees to contest their status as enemy combatants. This report provides an overview of the CSRT procedures and summarizes court cases related to the detentions. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7669/
Detainees at Guantànamo Bay
After the U.S. Supreme Court held that U.S. courts have jurisdiction to hear legal challenges on behalf of more than 500 persons detained at the U.S. Naval Station in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba in connection with the war against terrorism, the Pentagon established administrative hearings, called “Combatant Status Review Tribunals” (CSRTs), to allow the detainees to contest their status as enemy combatants. This report provides an overview of the CSRT procedures and summarizes court cases related to the detentions. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7668/
Terrorist Capabilities for Cyberattack: Overview and Policy Issues
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7633/
State Statutes Governing Hate Crimes
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7455/
Digital Surveillance: The Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act
The Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act (CALEA, P.L. 103- 414, 47 USC 1001-1010), enacted October 25, 1994, is intended to preserve the ability of law enforcement officials to conduct electronic surveillance effectively and efficiently despite the deployment of new digital technologies and wireless services that have altered the character of electronic surveillance. CALEA requires telecommunications carriers to modify their equipment, facilities, and services, wherever reasonably achievable, to ensure that they are able to comply with authorized electronic surveillance actions. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7259/
Protection of Lawful Commerce in Arms Act, H.R. 1036, S. 659, S. 1805, S. 1806, 108th Congress: Legal Analysis
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7058/
Guantanamo Detainees: Habeas Corpus Challenges in Federal Court
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs8224/
Terrorism and National Security: Issues and Trends
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs8450/
Social Security Administration: Suspension of Benefits for Fugitive Felons
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs8321/
Terrorism and National Security: Issues and Trends
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7404/
United States Sentencing Guidelines After Blakely: Booker and Fanfan - A Sketch
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7327/
Terrorism and National Security: Issues and Trends
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs8013/
Violence Against Women Act: History, Federal Funding, and Reauthorizing Legislation
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6840/
Violence Against Women Act: History, Federal Funding, and Reauthorizing Legislation
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6837/
China's Relations with Central Asian States and Problems with Terrorism
This report provides an overview of the Muslim separatist movement in China’s northwestern Xinjiang Uighur Autonomous Region, China’s attempts to stifle activities which it considers terrorism, and implications for U.S. policy. Some analysts suggest that the U.S.-led campaign against terrorism may make it difficult to pressure the Chinese government on human rights and religious freedoms, particularly as they relate to Uighur Muslims in Xinjiang. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6842/
Treatment of "Battlefield Detainees" in the War on Terrorism
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6924/
Welfare Law and Domestic Violence
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5724/
Welfare Law and Domestic Violence
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs3685/
Welfare Law and Domestic Violence
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2073/
Drug Control: International Policy and Approaches
Over the past decade, worldwide production of illicit drugs has risen dramatically: opium and marijuana production has roughly doubled and coca production tripled. Street prices of cocaine and heroin have fallen significantly in the past 20 years, reflecting increased availability. Despite apparent national political resolve to deal with the drug problem, inherent contradictions regularly appear between U.S. anti-drug policy and other national policy goals and concerns. The mix of competing domestic and international pressures and priorities has produced an ongoing series of disputes within and between the legislative and executive branches concerning U.S. international drug policy. One contentious issue has been the Congressionally-mandated certification process, an instrument designed to induce specified drug-exporting countries to prioritize or pay more attention to the fight against narcotics businesses. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6793/
Terrorism Risk Insurance: An Overview
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6785/