You limited your search to:

 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
Remedies Available to Victims of Identity Theft
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4136/
Polygraph Use by the Department of Energy: Issues for Congress
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4137/
Polygraph Use by the Department of Energy: Issues for Congress
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4138/
Polygraph Use by the Department of Energy: Issues for Congress
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6165/
USA PATRIOT Act Sunset: Provisions That Expire on December 31, 2005
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5789/
USA PATRIOT Act Sunset: Provisions That Expire on December 31, 2005
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5791/
USA PATRIOT Act Sunset: Provisions That Expire on December 31, 2005
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6169/
Terrorism in South Asia
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5792/
Terrorism in South Asia
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5793/
The Department of State's Patterns of Global Terrorism Report: Trends, State Sponsors, and Related Issues
This report highlights trends and data found in the State Department’s annual Patterns of Global Terrorism report, (Patterns 2003) and addresses selected issues relating to its content. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5794/
Military Tribunals: Historical Patterns and Lessons
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5797/
Removing Terrorist Sanctuaries: The 9/11 Commission Recommendations and U.S. Policy
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5795/
Terrorism: Key Recommendations of the 9/11 Commission and Recent Major Commissions and Inquiries
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5796/
Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act: Selected Legislation from the 108th Congress
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5798/
Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act: Selected Legislation from the 108th Congress
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6168/
Sudan: The Darfur Crisis and the Status of the North-South Negotiations
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5799/
Mexico's Counter-Narcotics Efforts under Fox, December 2000 to October 2004
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5800/
Guarding America: Security Guards and U.S. Critical Infrastructure Protection
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5801/
Gun Legislation in the 109th Congress
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6170/
Jonathan Pollard: Background and Considerations for Presidential Clemency
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1540/
Clean Air Standards: The Supreme Court Agrees to Review
In May, 2000, the Supreme Court agreed to review this decision, raising the prospect of a major pronouncement on the non-delegation doctrine, the enforceability of the revised ozone standard, and the role of compliance costs in setting nationwide air quality standards. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1128/
The D.C. Circuit Remands the Ozone and Particulate Matter Clean-Air Standards:
On May 14, 1999, in American Trucking Ass'ns v. EPA, a U.S. court of Appeals ruled that deficiencies in EPA's promulgation of new primary and secondary air quality standards required that they be remanded to the agency for further consideration. The decision is controversial, in part because the two-judge majority opinion relied principally on a long-moribund legal doctrine known as the nondelegation doctrine. The decision, if it survives appeal, will thus have implications for all delegations of congressional authority to agencies. In addition, its holding that the revised ozone ambient standard cannot be enforced has sparkled debate. By itself, however, the decision is unlikely to have major short-term effects on the ozone and particulate matter control programs digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs937/
Hate Crimes: Sketch of Selected Proposals and Congressional Authority
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2388/
Terrorist Attack on USS Cole: Background and Issues for Congress
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1541/
Environmental Streamlining Provisions in the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century: Status of Implementation
At the state and local level, many observers have expressed long-standing concerns over delays, duplication of effort, and additional costs frequently associated with the environmental review process for highway projects that must be completed under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA, P.L. 91-190). To address these concerns, the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century (TEA21, P.L. 105-178), enacted in 1998, requires the Federal Highway Administration(FHWA) to streamline the environmental review process for highway projects. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2389/
Environmental Streamlining Provisions in the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century: Status of Implementation
At the state and local level, many observers have expressed long-standing concerns over delays, duplication of effort, and additional costs frequently associated with the environmental review process for highway projects that must be completed under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA, P.L. 91-190). To address these concerns, the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century (TEA21, P.L. 105-178), enacted in 1998, requires the Federal Highway Administration(FHWA) to streamline the environmental review process for highway projects. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2390/
Environmental Streamlining Provisions in the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century: Status of Implementation
At the state and local level, many observers have expressed long-standing concerns over delays, duplication of effort, and additional costs frequently associated with the environmental review process for highway projects that must be completed under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA, P.L. 91-190). To address these concerns, the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century (TEA21, P.L. 105-178), enacted in 1998, requires the Federal Highway Administration(FHWA) to streamline the environmental review process for highway projects. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2391/
Environmental Streamlining Provisions in the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century: Status of Implementation
This report describes the environmental documents required for highway projects, discusses the average amount of time to complete this documentation, summarizes the environmental streamlining provisions under TEA-21, and examines administrative and legislative actions taken to implement these requirements. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4139/
Environmental Streamlining Provisions in the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century: Status of Implementation
This report describes the environmental documents required for highway projects, discusses the average amount of time to complete this documentation, summarizes the environmental streamlining provisions under TEA-21, and examines administrative and legislative actions taken to implement these requirements. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4140/
Environmental Streamlining Provisions in the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century: Status of Implementation
At the state and local level, many observers have expressed long-standing concerns over delays, duplication of effort, and additional costs frequently associated with the environmental review process for highway projects that must be completed under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA, P.L. 91-190). To address these concerns, the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century (TEA21, P.L. 105-178), enacted in 1998, requires the Federal Highway Administration(FHWA) to streamline the environmental review process for highway projects. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4141/
Response to Terrorism: Legal Aspects of the Use of Military Force
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1542/
Assassination Ban and E.O. 12333: A Brief Summary
This report offers a brief summary of the assassination ban contained in Executive Order (E.O.) 12333, Section 2.11. E.O. 12333 is the latest in a series of three executive orders which included assassination bans. The first, Executive Order 11905, Sec. 5(g),1 41 Fed. Reg. 7703, 7733 (President Gerald Ford, 2/19/76), was part of an executive order issued by President Ford in response to concerns raised in the 1970's with respect to alleged abuses by the U.S. intelligence community. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2392/
Latin America: Terrorism Issues
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6171/
Trying Terrorists as War Criminals
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1543/
Remedies Available to Victims of Identity Theft
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4142/
Remedies Available to Victims of Identity Theft
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4143/
Remedies Available to Victims of Identity Theft
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4144/
The USA PATRIOT Act: A Sketch
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2393/
Cybercrime: The Council of Europe Convention
Forty-three countries, including the United States, have signed the Council of Europe’s Convention on Cybercrime of November 2001. The U.S. Senate ratified the Convention on August 3, 2006. The Convention seeks to better combat cybercrime by harmonizing national laws, improving investigative abilities, and boosting international cooperation. Supporters argue that the Convention will enhance deterrence, while critics counter it will have little effect without participation by countries in which cybercriminals operate freely. Others warn it will endanger privacy and civil liberties. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs2394/
Internet: Status Report on Legislative Attempts to Protect Children from Unsuitable Material on the Web
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5802/
Internet: Status Report on Legislative Attempts to Protect Children from Unsuitable Material on the Web
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5803/
Internet: Status Report on Legislative Attempts to Protect Children from Unsuitable Material on the Web
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5804/
Internet: Status Report on Legislative Attempts to Protect Children from Unsuitable Material on the Web
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5805/
Protection of Lawful Commerce in Arms Act, H.R. 1036 and S. 659, 108th Congress: Legal Analysis
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4145/
Protection of Lawful Commerce in Arms Act, H.R. 1036, 108th Congress: Legal Analysis
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs4146/
Military Courts-Martial: An Overview
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs5806/
Environmental Protection: Defense-Related Programs
The Department of Defense (DOD) operates six environmental programs that address cleanup of past contamination at military facilities, compliance with environmental laws and regulations that apply to current activities, cleanup at military bases being closed, pollution prevention, natural resource conservation, and environmental technology. In addition, the Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for managing defense nuclear waste generated from the past production of atomic materials used to construct nuclear weapons and for remediating contaminated sites. For FY1999, the Administration has requested a total of $10. 14 billion for DOD and DOE's defense-related environmental activities, which represents about 3.7% of the total request of $271.6 billion for national defense and is roughly 1.6% below the FY1998 funding level of $l0.30 billion. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs615/
Defense Cleanup and Environmental Programs: Authorization and Appropriations for FY2000
Although Congress authorizes most federal programs for multiple years, it annually authorizes programs for national defense as well as appropriating funding for them each fiscal year. Of the activities traditionally authorized and funded, the Department of Defense (DOD) administers the following six environmental programs: environmental restoration, compliance, cleanup at base closure sites, pollution prevention, environmental technology, and natural resource conservation. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs940/
Defense Cleanup and Environmental Programs: Authorization and Appropriations for FY2001
The Department of Defense operates six environmental programs: cleanup of past contamination at military facilities, acceleration of cleanup at military bases designated for closure, compliance with environmental laws and regulations that apply to ongoing military operations, pollution prevention, natural resource conservation, and environmental technology. In addition to these activities, the Department of Energy is responsible for managing defense nuclear waste and remediating contaminated sites. This report discusses the federal laws that established these programs, describes their scope and purpose, provides a history of appropriations, indicates the President’s budget request for FY2001, examines authorization and appropriations legislation for FY2001, and discusses other relevant legislation considered in the 106th Congress. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1144/
Defense Cleanup and Environmental Programs: Authorization and Appropriations for FY2001
The Department of Defense operates six environmental programs: cleanup of past contamination at military facilities, acceleration of cleanup at military bases designated for closure, compliance with environmental laws and regulations that apply to ongoing military operations, pollution prevention, natural resource conservation, and environmental technology. In addition to these activities, the Department of Energy is responsible for managing defense nuclear waste and remediating contaminated sites. This report discusses the federal laws that established these programs, describes their scope and purpose, provides a history of appropriations, indicates the President’s budget request for FY2001, examines authorization and appropriations legislation for FY2001, and discusses other relevant legislation considered in the 106th Congress. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs1584/