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 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
Suspension of the Rules in the House of Representatives

Suspension of the Rules in the House of Representatives

Date: February 1, 2005
Creator: Carr, Thomas P
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Constitutionality of a Senate Filibuster of a Judicial Nomination

Constitutionality of a Senate Filibuster of a Judicial Nomination

Date: December 6, 2004
Creator: Shampansky, Jay R
Description: This report provides an overview of the major issues which have been raised recently in the Senate regarding the Judicial Nominations, Filibusters, and the Constitution: When a Majority Is Denied Its Right to Consent and in the press concerning the constitutionality of a Senate filibuster (i.e., extended debate) of a judicial nomination.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Constitutionality of a Senate Filibuster of a Judicial Nomination

Constitutionality of a Senate Filibuster of a Judicial Nomination

Date: October 3, 2003
Creator: Shampansky, Jay R
Description: This report provides an overview of the major issues which have been raised recently in the Senate regarding the Judicial Nominations, Filibusters, and the Constitution: When a Majority Is Denied Its Right to Consent and in the press concerning the constitutionality of a Senate filibuster (i.e., extended debate) of a judicial nomination.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
House Vacancies: Proposed Constitutional Amendments for Filling Them Due to National Emergencies

House Vacancies: Proposed Constitutional Amendments for Filling Them Due to National Emergencies

Date: August 12, 2003
Creator: Richardson, Sula P
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Evolution of the Senate's Role in the Nomination and Confirmation Process: A Brief History

Evolution of the Senate's Role in the Nomination and Confirmation Process: A Brief History

Date: March 29, 2005
Creator: Palmer, Betsy
Description: Over time, the Senate has developed a series of procedures to deal with the concerns of its Members on nominations. First is the custom of senatorial courtesy, whereby Senators from the same party as the President might influence a nomination or kill it by objecting to it. This tradition has not always been absolute, but it has allowed Senators to play a fairly large role, particularly in the selection of nominees within a Senator’s home state, such as for district court judgeships.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Budget Enforcement Procedures: Senate's Pay-As-You-Go (PAYGO) Rule

Budget Enforcement Procedures: Senate's Pay-As-You-Go (PAYGO) Rule

Date: June 2, 2003
Creator: Heniff, Bill, Jr
Description: The Senate’s “pay-as-you-go,” or PAYGO, rule generally prohibits the consideration of direct spending and revenue legislation that is projected to increase (or cause) an on-budget deficit in any one of three time periods: the first year, the first 5 years, and the second 5 years, covered by the most recently adopted budget resolution. Any increase in direct spending or reduction in revenues resulting from such legislation must be offset by an equivalent amount of direct spending cuts, tax increases, or a combination of the two.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
House Resolutions of Inquiry

House Resolutions of Inquiry

Date: May 12, 2003
Creator: Fisher, Louis
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Congressional Investigations: Subpoenas and Contempt Power

Congressional Investigations: Subpoenas and Contempt Power

Date: April 2, 2003
Creator: Fisher, Louis
Description: When conducting investigations of the executive branch, congressional committees and Members of Congress generally receive the information required for legislative needs. If agencies fail to cooperate or the President invokes executive privilege, Congress can turn to a number of legislative powers that are likely to compel compliance. The two techniques described in this report are the issuance of subpoenas and the holding of executive officials in contempt. These techniques usually lead to an accommodation that meets the needs of both branches. Litigation is used at times, but federal judges generally encourage congressional and executive parties to settle their differences out of court. The specific examples in this report explain how information disputes arise and how they are resolved.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Committee Funding for the House and Senate, 108th Congress

Committee Funding for the House and Senate, 108th Congress

Date: May 7, 2003
Creator: Rundquist, Paul S & Petersen, R. Eric
Description: The Senate adopted ad hoc procedures in approving committee operating budgets. With the Senate divided 51-48-1 at the beginning of the 108th Congress, Senate Democrats argued for a proportional allocation of committee staff between the parties. On January 15, after a week-long delay in the appointment of Senate committees, a unanimous consent agreement was reached providing for the proportional allocation of staff and office space between the parties on each committee, with a separate provision for each committee chair to control up to 10% of the committee budget to employ administrative staff serving both parties.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Committee Funding for the House and Senate, 108th Congress

Committee Funding for the House and Senate, 108th Congress

Date: April 21, 2003
Creator: Rundquist, Paul S & Petersen, R. Eric
Description: The Senate adopted ad hoc procedures in approving committee operating budgets. With the Senate divided 51-48-1 at the beginning of the 108th Congress, Senate Democrats argued for a proportional allocation of committee staff between the parties. On January 15, after a week-long delay in the appointment of Senate committees, a unanimous consent agreement was reached providing for the proportional allocation of staff and office space between the parties on each committee, with a separate provision for each committee chair to control up to 10% of the committee budget to employ administrative staff serving both parties.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department