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 Country: United States
 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
House Committee Markup: Reporting

House Committee Markup: Reporting

Date: January 11, 1999
Creator: Schneider, Judy
Description: At the end of the amendment process, the chair normally entertains a motion to report a measure favorably to the House. This report addresses the procedural options committees have regarding the form of reporting, such as what happens to amendments adopted in markup, as well as other considerations at the time of reporting.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
House Committee Hearings: Arranging Witnesses

House Committee Hearings: Arranging Witnesses

Date: March 15, 2001
Creator: Carr, Thomas P.
Description: This report briefly discusses the process of selecting and arranging witnesses for House committee hearings.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
House Rules Governing Committee Markup Procedures

House Rules Governing Committee Markup Procedures

Date: January 27, 1999
Creator: Bach, Stanley
Description: This report provides general guidance to committees for conducting meetings to mark up legislation.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
House Committee Markup: Amendment Procedure

House Committee Markup: Amendment Procedure

Date: January 11, 1999
Creator: Schneider, Judy
Description: This report briefly discusses committee markups in the House of Representatives. The essential purpose of a committee markup is to determine whether a measure pending before a committee should be altered, or amended, in any substantive way. Of course, committees do not actually amend measures; instead a committee votes on which amendments it wishes to recommend to the House.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
House Committee Hearings: Scheduling and Notification

House Committee Hearings: Scheduling and Notification

Date: March 8, 1999
Creator: Hardy-Vincent, Carol
Description: Each House committee has authority to hold hearings whether the House is in session, has recessed, or has adjourned (Rule XI, clause 2(m)(1)(A)). Regardless of the type of hearing, or whether a hearing is held in or outside of Washington, hearings share common aspects of planning and preparation. this report discusses the issues a committee faces in deciding whether to schedule a hearing.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
House Committees: Assignment Process?

House Committees: Assignment Process?

Date: January 21, 1999
Creator: Schneider, Judy
Description: This report briefly discusses House Committee assignments, examining the process and assessing its effects.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Instructing House Conferees

Instructing House Conferees

Date: January 27, 1999
Creator: Bach, Stanley
Description: This report describes the process of reaching the final agreement between house and senate over the final version of a bill that the two houses have passes in different forms.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Guide to Individuals Seated on the Senate Dais

Guide to Individuals Seated on the Senate Dais

Date: July 16, 2003
Creator: Amer, Mildred L
Description: This report is a brief summary of House and Senate procedures for reaching agreement on legislation. It discusses the provisions of House Rule XXII and Senate Rule XXVIII as well as other applicable rules, precedents, and practices. The report focuses on the most common and customary procedures.
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Invoking Cloture in the Senate

Invoking Cloture in the Senate

Date: May 9, 2003
Creator: Davis, Christopher M
Description: This report discuses cloture, which is is the only procedure by which the Senate can vote to set an end to a debate without also rejecting the bill, amendment, conference report, motion, or other matter it has been debating. A Senator can make a nondebatable motion to table an amendment, and if a majority of the Senate votes for that motion, the effect is to reject the amendment. Thus, the motion to table cannot be used to conclude a debate when Senators still wish to speak and to enable the Senate to vote for the proposal it is considering. Only the cloture provisions of Rule XXII achieve this purpose.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Invoking Cloture in the Senate

Invoking Cloture in the Senate

Date: February 9, 2005
Creator: Davis, Christopher M
Description: This report discuses cloture, which is is the only procedure by which the Senate can vote to set an end to a debate without also rejecting the bill, amendment, conference report, motion, or other matter it has been debating. A Senator can make a nondebatable motion to table an amendment, and if a majority of the Senate votes for that motion, the effect is to reject the amendment. Thus, the motion to table cannot be used to conclude a debate when Senators still wish to speak and to enable the Senate to vote for the proposal it is considering. Only the cloture provisions of Rule XXII achieve this purpose.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department