You limited your search to:

 Decade: 1990-1999
 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
Congress' Early Organization Meetings
The purposes of these meetings are both educational and organizational. Educational sessions range from legislative procedures and staff hiring to current issues. Organizational sessions elect class officers, party leaders, and chamber officers; name committee representatives and other party officials; and select committee chairmen and often committee members. Such actions are officially ratified at the start of the new Congress. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs303/
Bills, Resolutions, Nominations, and Treaties: Origins, Deadlines, Requirements, and Uses
In addition to bill and/or joint resolution this report presents two other acts of congress; 1) nominations and 2) treaties. It also discusses the characteristics and uses of six different kind of business before Congress, such as designation, origin, deadline for action, requirements for approval, and use. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs915/
Bills and Resolutions: Examples of How Each Kind is Used
This report provides background information regarding the bill and joint resolution, which must be passed by both houses in identical form, then presented to the President for his approval or disapproval. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs913/
Engrossment, Enrollment, and Presentation of Legislation
Engrossment, enrollment, and presentation of legislation are technical components of the legislative process. They attest to the accuracy of bill texts, confirm passage by the House and Senate, and confirm delivery of the bills to the President for his review. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs918/
Post Employment, "Revolving Door," Restrictions for Legislative Branch Members and Employees
This report provides a brief discussion of the post-employment restrictions, often called "revolving door" laws, that are applicable to members, officers, and employees of Congress after they leave congressional service or employment. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc26097/
Messages, Petitions, Communications, and Memorials to Congress
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs919/
The Committee System in the U.S. Congress
Due to the high volume and complexity of its work, Congress divides its tasks among approximately 44 committees with 154 subcommittees. The House and Senate each has its own committee systems, which are similar. Within chamber guidelines, however, each committee adopts its own rules; thus, there is considerable variation among panels. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs183/
Investigative Oversight: An Introduction to the Law, Practice and Procedure of Congressional Inquiry
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs184/
Salaries and Allowances: The Congress
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs923/
Points of Order, Rulings, and Appeals in the House of Representatives
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs587/
Questions of Privilege in the House
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs589/
Term Limits for Members of Congress: State Activity
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs582/
Legislative Powers of Congress: A Brief Reference Guide
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs583/
How to Follow Current Federal Legislation and Regulations
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs8173/
Privileged Business on the House Floor
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs588/
Procedural Distinctions Between the House and the Committee of the Whole
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs586/
Special Rules and Waivers of House Rules
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs590/
Decorum in House Debate
The basic standards of decorum that govern remarks made in the House of Representatives are described in this report. The report also discusses the procedure for "words taken down" and other mechanisms used in the House for enforcing these standards. The standards and mechanisms covered here include those set forth in House rules, related sections of Jefferson's Manual, published precedents, and supplementary policy statements by the Speaker. Also provided are examples from the 103rd-105th Congress of words spoken in House floor debate that led to one or more enforcement mechanisms being invoked. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs912/
Amendments Between the Houses
This report briefly summarizes the process of amendments between the House of Representatives and the Senate, which occurs if the House and Senate approve differing versions of a measure. An exchange of amendments between the houses resolves these differences. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs917/
Guiding a Bill Through the Legislative Process
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs99/
Congressional Oversight
Congressional oversight of policy implementation and administration, which has occurred throughout the U.S. government experience under the Constitution, takes a variety of forms and utilizes various techniques. These range from specialized investigations by select committees to annual appropriations hearings, and from informal communications between Members or congressional staff and executive personnel to the use of extra congressional mechanisms, such as offices of inspector general and study commissions. Oversight, moreover, is supported by a variety of authorities—the Constitution, public law, and chamber and committee rules—and is an integral part of the system of checks and balances between the legislature and the executive digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs411/
Fast Track for Trade Agreements: Procedural Controls for Congress and Proposed Alternatives
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs414/
Secret Sessions of Congress: A Brief Historical Overview
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs932/
Congressional Budget Actions in 1997
In 1997, during the first session of the 105th Congress, the House and Senate will consider many different budgetary measures. Most of these measures will pertain to FY1998 and beyond, but some measures will make adjustments in the budget for the current fiscal year, FY1997. This issue brief describes House and Senate action on major budgetary legislation within the framework of the congressional budget process and other procedural requirements. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs413/
One-Minute Speeches: Current House Practices
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs927/
How Measures Are Brought to the House Floor: A Brief Introduction
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs404/
Environmental Protection Issues: From the 104th to the 105th Congress
The continued interest in regulatory reform measures in the final moments of the 104th Congress suggests that the 105th Congress will consider them again. At the same time the fact that the 104th Congress enacted flexibility provisions in drinking water and food safety/pesticides legislation could be an indicator that the 105th Congress may pursue reforms in individual reauthorization legislation rather than in broad regulatory reform bills. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs436/
Grants Work in a Congressional Office
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs405/
Special Rules in the House of Representatives
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs308/
Solid Waste Issues in the 105th Congress
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs785/
Persian Gulf War: Defense-Policy Implications for Congress
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6963/
Appropriations for FY1999: Legislative Branch
Appropriations are one part of a complex federal budget process that includes budget resolutions, appropriations (regular, supplemental, and continuing) bills, rescissions, and budget reconciliation bills. This report is a guide to one of the 13 regular appropriations bills that Congress passes each year. It is designed to supplement the information provided by the House and Senate Appropriations Subcommittees on Legislative Branch Appropriations. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs903/
Congressional Budget Act Points of Order
Title III of the Congressional Budget Act (CBA) of 1974 (P.L. 93-344), as amended, establishes the points of order that are used to enforce congressional budget procedures and substantive provisions of a budget resolution. These points of order prohibit certain congressional actions and consideration of certain legislation. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs597/
Points of Order in the Congressional Budget Process
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs899/
The Congressional Budget Process Timetable
The Congressional Budget Act (CBA) of 1974 (P.L. 93-344), as amended, establishes the congressional budget process, which coordinates the legislative activities on the budget resolution, appropriations bills, reconciliation legislation, revenue measures, and other budgetary legislation. Section 300 of this act provides a timetable (see Table 1) so that Congress may complete its work on the budget by the start of the fiscal year on October 1. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs594/
Congressional Gold Medals 1776-1999
Since the American Revolution, Congress has commissioned gold medals as its highest expression of national appreciation for distinguished achievements and contributions. These medals should not be confused with the Medal of Honor, which is presented “in the name of the Congress of the United States,” and is often referred to as the Congressional Medal of Honor. Regulations for the Medal of Honor are established by the armed services. Congressional Gold Medals, conversely, can only be approved by Congress. This report provides a response to such inquiries and includes a historical examination and chronological list of these awards intended to assist Members of Congress in their consideration of future proposals to award Congressional Gold Medals. It will be updated annually. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs925/
Legislative Branch Appropriations Bill: Fact Sheet on Structure, Content, and Process
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs914/
Overview of the Congressional Budget Process
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs933/
Congressional Budget Act Points of Order
Title III of the Congressional Budget Act (CBA) of 1974 (P.L. 93-344), as amended, establishes the points of order that are used to enforce congressional budget procedures and substantive provisions of a budget resolution. These points of order prohibit certain congressional actions and consideration of certain legislation. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs921/
Allocations and Subdivisions in the Congressional Budget Process
This report briefly explains how the annual budget resolution sets forth total spending and revenue levels, which are then allocated to the appropriate House and Senate committees, which in turn help Congress determine how best to enforce spending once a budget resolution is adopted. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs931/
Sponsorship and Cosponsorship of House Bills
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs902/
The Congressional Budget Process Timetable
The Congressional Budget Act (CBA) of 1974 (P.L. 93-344), as amended, establishes the congressional budget process, which coordinates the legislative activities on the budget resolution, appropriations bills, reconciliation legislation, revenue measures, and other budgetary legislation. Section 300 of this act provides a timetable (see Table 1) so that Congress may complete its work on the budget by the start of the fiscal year on October 1. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs911/
Congressional Campaign Spending: 1976-1996
The data in this report reflect spending by congressional candidates from funds donated by individuals, political action committees (PACs), parties, and candidates. Thus, it includes expenditures under candidate control and does not reflect spending on their behalf, with or without their cooperation, by parties, PACs, and other groups. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs406/
Introducing a House Bill or Resolution
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs910/
How to Obtain Copies of Videotapes of Proceedings of Congress and Network and Cable Television Broadcasts
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs361/
House Administrative Reorganization: 104th Congress
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs305/
Preventing Federal Government Shutdowns: Proposals for an Automatic Continuing Resolution
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs875/
House Committee Hearings: Scheduling and Notification
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs907/
Instructing House Conferees
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs909/
Proposed Budget Process Reforms in the Senate: A Brief Analysis of Senate Resolutions 4, 5, 6, and 8
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs922/
FIRST PREV 1 2 3 NEXT LAST