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 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
Interrogation of Detainees: Overview of the McCain Amendment

Interrogation of Detainees: Overview of the McCain Amendment

Date: October 2, 2006
Creator: Garcia, Michael John
Description: Controversy has arisen regarding U.S. treatment of enemy combatants and terrorist suspects detained in Iraq, Afghanistan, and other locations, and whether such treatment complies with related U.S. statutes and treaties. Certain provisions of the Detainee Treatment Act (DTA), first introduced by Senator John McCain, have popularly been referred to as the "McCain Amendment." This report discusses the McCain amendment and also discusses the application of the McCain Amendment by the DOD in the updated 2006 version of the Army Field Manual.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Interrogation of Detainees: Overview of the McCain Amendment

Interrogation of Detainees: Overview of the McCain Amendment

Date: September 25, 2006
Creator: Garcia, Michael John
Description: Controversy has arisen regarding U.S. treatment of enemy combatants and terrorist suspects detained in Iraq, Afghanistan, and other locations, and whether such treatment complies with U.S. statutes and treaties such as the U.N. Convention Against Torture and Other Forms of Cruel and Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment (CAT) and the 1949 Geneva Conventions. Congress approved additional guidelines concerning the treatment of detainees via the Detainee Treatment Act (DTA), which was enacted pursuant to both the Department of Defense, Emergency Supplemental Appropriations to Address Hurricanes in the Gulf of Mexico, and Pandemic Influenza Act, 2006 (P.L. 109-148), and the National Defense Authorization Act for FY2006 (P.L. 109-163). Among other things, the DTA contains provisions that (1) require Department of Defense (DOD) personnel to employ United States Army Field Manual guidelines while interrogating detainees, and (2) prohibit the “cruel, inhuman and degrading treatment or punishment of persons under the detention, custody, or control of the United States Government.” These provisions of the DTA, which were first introduced by Senator John McCain, have popularly been referred to as the “McCain Amendment.” This report discusses the McCain Amendment, as modified and subsequently enacted into law.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Interrogation of Detainees: Overview of the McCain Amendment

Interrogation of Detainees: Overview of the McCain Amendment

Date: October 2, 2006
Creator: Garcia, Michael John
Description: Controversy has arisen regarding U.S. treatment of enemy combatants and terrorist suspects detained in Iraq, Afghanistan, and other locations, and whether such treatment complies with U.S. statutes and treaties such as the U.N. Convention Against Torture and Other Forms of Cruel and Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment (CAT) and the 1949 Geneva Conventions. Congress approved additional guidelines concerning the treatment of detainees via the Detainee Treatment Act (DTA), which was enacted pursuant to both the Department of Defense, Emergency Supplemental Appropriations to Address Hurricanes in the Gulf of Mexico, and Pandemic Influenza Act, 2006 (P.L. 109-148), and the National Defense Authorization Act for FY2006 (P.L. 109-163). Among other things, the DTA contains provisions that (1) require Department of Defense (DOD) personnel to employ United States Army Field Manual guidelines while interrogating detainees, and (2) prohibit the “cruel, inhuman and degrading treatment or punishment of persons under the detention, custody, or control of the United States Government.” These provisions of the DTA, which were first introduced by Senator John McCain, have popularly been referred to as the “McCain Amendment.” This report discusses the McCain Amendment, as modified and subsequently enacted into law.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Interrogation of Detainees: Overview of the McCain Amendment

Interrogation of Detainees: Overview of the McCain Amendment

Date: September 20, 2006
Creator: Garcia, Michael J.
Description: This report discusses the Detainee Treatment Act (DTA), which contains provisions that (1) require Department of Defense (DOD) personnel to employ United States Army Field Manual guidelines while interrogating detainees, and (2) prohibit the “cruel, inhuman and degrading treatment or punishment of persons under the detention, custody, or control of the United States Government.” These provisions of the DTA, which were first introduced by Senator John McCain, have popularly been referred to as the “McCain amendment.” This report discusses the McCain amendment, as modified and subsequently enacted into law. This report also discusses the application of the McCain amendment by the DOD in the updated 2006 version of the Army Field Manual, particularly in light of the Supreme Court’s ruling in Hamdan v. Rumsfeld.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Tying Up Loose Ends... Supreme Court To Evaluate Federal Firearm Provision Again

Tying Up Loose Ends... Supreme Court To Evaluate Federal Firearm Provision Again

Date: December 3, 2015
Creator: unknown
Description: This legal sidebar discusses certiorari to hear Voisine v. United States, a decision examining the federal provision that makes it unlawful for an individual to possess a firearm or ammunition if he or she has been convicted of a misdemeanor crime of domestic violence (MCDV).
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
9/11 Commission Recommendations: A Civil Liberties Oversight Board

9/11 Commission Recommendations: A Civil Liberties Oversight Board

Date: December 22, 2004
Creator: Relyea, Harold C.
Description: This report discusses the recommendation made by the National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States (9/11 Commission) regarding the creation of a board within the executive branch to oversee adherence to guidelines on, and the commitment to defend, civil liberties by the federal government.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Summary of the Proposed Rule for the Privacy of Individually Identifiable Health Information

Summary of the Proposed Rule for the Privacy of Individually Identifiable Health Information

Date: March 22, 2000
Creator: Stevens, Gina Marie & DeAtley, Melinda
Description: This report provides a summary of the proposed rule issued November 3, 1999 to protect the privacy of individually identifiable health information.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
United Nations Commission on Human Rights (UNCHR): U.S. Membership

United Nations Commission on Human Rights (UNCHR): U.S. Membership

Date: June 4, 2001
Creator: Bite, Vita
Description: This short report provides an overview of the U.N. Commission on Human Rights (UNCHR and Administration and Congressional responses to recent developments.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The United Nations Human Rights Council: Issues for Congress

The United Nations Human Rights Council: Issues for Congress

Date: February 4, 2014
Creator: Blanchfield, Luisa
Description: This report provides historical background of the United Nations Human Rights Council, including the role of the previous Commission. It discusses the Council's current mandate and structure, as well as U.S. policy and congressional actions. Finally, it highlights possible policy issues for the 112th Congress, including the overall effectiveness of the Council in addressing human rights, implications for U.S. membership, and U.S. financial contributions to the Council.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Privacy Protection for Customer Financial Information

Privacy Protection for Customer Financial Information

Date: July 14, 2014
Creator: Murphy, M. Maureen
Description: This report discusses federal laws governing consumer financial information held by financial companies, Gramm-Leach-Bliley's privacy provisions, and public and industry reaction.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department