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 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
First Responder Initiative: Policy Issues and Options

First Responder Initiative: Policy Issues and Options

Date: November 27, 2002
Creator: Canada, Ben
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Baseline Budget Projections: A Discussion of Issues

Baseline Budget Projections: A Discussion of Issues

Date: March 1, 2005
Creator: Labonte, Marc
Description: Between January 2001 and January 2005, the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) reduced its 10-year baseline projection for the period 2002-2011 from a peak surplus of $5.6 trillion to a deficit of $2.6 trillion for three reasons. First, about one third of the reduction is due to technical revisions CBO made to its projections (e.g., to account for the smaller than predicted growth in tax revenues). Second, the recession both reduced revenues and raised outlays automatically. This factor accounts for less than one-tenth of the 10-year decline, and is only significant in 2002 and 2003. Finally, about 60% of the reduction was due to policy changes, the largest of which was tax cuts, and the second largest of which was increased military outlays. Even without a recession or technical revisions, policy changes alone would have pushed the budget into deficit from 2003 to 2005.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
V-22 Osprey Tilt-Rotor Aircraft

V-22 Osprey Tilt-Rotor Aircraft

Date: August 4, 2005
Creator: Bolkcom, Christopher
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Federal Emergency Management Agency Funding for Homeland Security and Other Activities

Federal Emergency Management Agency Funding for Homeland Security and Other Activities

Date: April 9, 2002
Creator: Bea, Keith
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Federal Migrant Education Program as Amended by the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001

The Federal Migrant Education Program as Amended by the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001

Date: March 11, 2002
Creator: Kuenzi, Jeffrey J
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Economics of the Federal Budget Deficit

The Economics of the Federal Budget Deficit

Date: March 31, 2005
Creator: Cashell, Brian W
Description: In FY1998, federal budget receipts exceeded outlays for the first time since 1969. Those surpluses continued through FY2001. At one time, those surpluses had been projected to continue, but conditions have since changed. The economy went into recession in 2001, and a stimulus package was enacted. Since then, the budget has been in deficit. The actual unified budget deficit for FY2004 was $412.1 billion. In January 2005, the Congressional Budget Office projected that there would be a budget deficit of $368 billion in FY2005, and a deficit of $295 billion in FY2006.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Emergency Funding for Agriculture: A Brief History of Supplemental Appropriations, FY1989-FY2005

Emergency Funding for Agriculture: A Brief History of Supplemental Appropriations, FY1989-FY2005

Date: June 23, 2005
Creator: Chite, Ralph M
Description: From FY1989 through FY2005 (to date), 31 appropriations, authorization, or farm disaster acts added approximately $53.2 billion in supplemental funding for U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) programs (excluding the Forest Service, which is funded annually under the Interior appropriations bill). Nearly $41 billion, or 77% of the total amount, was for FY1999-FY2005 alone. Two FY2005 supplementals have been enacted to date, the largest of which was a disaster relief package in response to the 2004 hurricanes and other natural disasters, which included $3.5 billion for agricultural losses (attached to the FY2005 Military Construction Appropriations Act (P.L. 108-324)).
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Budget Reconciliation Process: The Senate's "Byrd" Rule

The Budget Reconciliation Process: The Senate's "Byrd" Rule

Date: April 7, 2005
Creator: Keith, Robert
Description: Reconciliation is a procedure under the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 by which Congress implements budget resolution policies affecting mainly permanent spending and revenue programs. The principal focus in the reconciliation process has been deficit reduction, but in recent years reconciliation has encompassed revenue reduction generally and spending increases in selected program areas. The Byrd rule provides six definitions of what constitutes extraneous matter for purposes of the rule (and several exceptions thereto), but the term is generally described as covering provisions unrelated to achieving the goals of the reconciliation instructions.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Budget Reconciliation Process: The Senate's "Byrd" Rule

The Budget Reconciliation Process: The Senate's "Byrd" Rule

Date: February 19, 2004
Creator: Keith, Robert
Description: Reconciliation is a procedure under the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 by which Congress implements budget resolution policies affecting mainly permanent spending and revenue programs. The principal focus in the reconciliation process has been deficit reduction, but in recent years reconciliation has encompassed revenue reduction generally and spending increases in selected program areas. The Byrd rule provides six definitions of what constitutes extraneous matter for purposes of the rule (and several exceptions thereto), but the term is generally described as covering provisions unrelated to achieving the goals of the reconciliation instructions.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Broadband Internet Access and the Digital Divide: Federal Assistance Programs

Broadband Internet Access and the Digital Divide: Federal Assistance Programs

Date: July 21, 2005
Creator: Kruger, Lennard G & Gilroy, Angele A
Description: Some policymakers, believing that disparities in broadband access across American society could have adverse economic and social consequences on those left behind, assert that the federal government should play a more active role to avoid a “digital divide” in broadband access. One approach is for the federal government to provide financial assistance to support broadband deployment in underserved areas. Others, however, believe that federal assistance for broadband deployment is not appropriate. Some opponents question the reality of the “digital divide,” and argue that federal intervention in the broadband marketplace would be premature and, in some cases, counterproductive.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department