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 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
Community Services Block Grants (CSBG): Funding and Reauthorization
Community Services Block Grants (CSBG), administered by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), provide federal funds to states, territories and Indian tribes for distribution to local agencies to reduce poverty. Several related national activities — Community Economic Development, Rural Community Facilities, National Youth Sports, Community Food and Nutrition, Job Opportunities for Low-Income Individuals (JOLI) and Individual Development Accounts (IDAs) — also provide grants to local communities for a variety of anti-poverty initiatives. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7443/
The Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD): FY2006 Budget
On July 21, 2005, the Senate Appropriations Committee approved a $34.8 billion FY2006 budget for HUD. Like the House version, the Senate bill rejects the President’s Strengthening America’s Communities Initiative (SACI). It increases funding above both the President’s request and the House version for HOPE VI, Community Development Block Grant (CDBG)-related programs (including Section 108 loan guarantees), Native American Housing Block Grants, and Rural Housing and Economic Development. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7441/
Homeland Security Department: FY2006 Appropriations
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Environmental Protection Agency: Appropriations for FY2006
The 109th Congress moved funding jurisdiction for the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) from the Veterans Affairs, Housing and Urban Development (VA-HUD), and Independent Agencies appropriations subcommittee to the Interior subcommittee. Title II of the Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act for FY2006 (P.L. 109-54, H.R. 2361) provides $7.73 billion for EPA, subject to an across-the-board rescission of 0.476%. Section 439 of Title IV indicates that the rescission is to be applied proportionately among each account, program, project, and activity specified in the law, accompanying reports, and the President’s budget request. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7436/
PAYGO Rules for Budget Enforcement in the House and Senate
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The Budget for Fiscal Year 2006
On February 7, 2005, the President presented his FY2006 budget, containing proposals and estimates for FY2006 through FY2010. The proposal has a deficit of $390 billion (3.0% of GDP) in FY2006, and steadily declining deficits through FY2010. The budget did not include estimates of the cost of the war on terror beyond FY2005. It did not include cost estimates of the Administration’s proposals for changes in Social Security. It did include specific proposals that, over five years, would reduce spending among the non-defense discretionary programs; slow the growth in defense spending; slow the growth in selected categories of mandatory spending; and make further tax cuts along with making permanent the 2001 and 2003 tax cuts. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7433/
Federal Research and Development Funding: FY2006
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FY2005 Supplemental Appropriations for Iraq and Afghanistan, Tsunami Relief, and Other Activities
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Duration of Continuing Resolutions in Recent Years
This report provides information on congressional practices with respect to the duration of continuing resolutions, including the use of full-year measures, and focuses particularly on the period covering FY1997-FY2005 digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7425/
Assistance After Hurricanes and Other Disasters: FY2004 and FY2005 Supplemental Appropriations
After a series of devastating hurricanes struck Florida and other states in the summer of 2004, the 108th Congress passed two emergency supplemental appropriations statutes that provide a total of $16.475 billion to areas stricken by the hurricanes and other natural disasters. The House and Senate quickly approved legislation (H.R. 5005) the day after President Bush submitted a request on September 6 for $2 billion in FY2004 funding, largely in response to the devastation caused by Hurricanes Charley and Frances in Florida. The other issue that was a matter of public debate focused on a proposed amendment in the House to fully offset the cost of the FY2005 supplemental through a proportional reduction in discretionary funds; the House rejected the amendment. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7389/
Border and Transportation Security: Appropriations for FY2005
This report is a guide to a subset of one of the 13 regular appropriation bills that Congress passes each year. It is designed to supplement the information provided by the House and Senate Appropriations Subcommittees on Homeland Security; and to supplement the information provided in the CRS Department of Homeland Security Appropriations report. This report summarizes the current legislative status of the bill, major issues, funding levels, and legislative activity related to border and transportation security and will be updated as events warrant. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7388/
Veterans' Medical Care Appropriations and Funding Process
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The Mid-Session Review of the President’s Budget: Timing Issues
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Congressional Budget Actions in 2004
During the second session of the 108th Congress, the House and Senate considered many different budgetary measures. Most of them pertained to FY2005 (referred to as the “budget year”) and beyond. In addition, some made adjustments to the budget for FY2004 (referred to as the “current year”). This report describes House and Senate action on major budgetary legislation within the framework of the congressional budget process and other procedural requirements. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7377/
Harbors and Inland Waterways: An Overview of Federal Financing
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Across-the-Board Spending Cuts in Omnibus Appropriations Acts
This report examines the use of across-the-board spending cuts in omnibus appropriations acts for FY2000-FY2004, assessing the budgetary context leading to the spending cut, recounting the legislative action on the spending cut provision, and reviewing the provision’s design and implementation. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7375/
Phosphorus Mitigation in the Everglades
This report discusses the FY2004 appropriations provisions that condition federal funding for Everglades restoration on compliance with water quality standards, provides a side-by-side analysis of pending appropriations legislation, and provides background and a timeline of efforts to address Everglades phosphorus pollution (from Summary). digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7374/
The Debt Limit: The Ongoing Need for Increases
The surpluses over the four fiscal years 1998-2001 reduced debt held by the public by $448 billion. More than offsetting this debt reduction, the surpluses credited to debt-holding government accounts (which generally must invest the surpluses in federal debt), increased their holdings by $853 billion over the same period. The combination ($853 billion minus $448 billion) raised total federal debt by $405 billion. During 2002, debt subject to limit increased enough to reach the then current statutory debt limit, $5.95 trillion, in early April and again in May 2002. Congress passed and the President signed legislation (P.L. 108-24) increasing the limit to $6.4 trillion in June 2002. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7420/
Iraq: Recent Developments in Reconstruction Assistance
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Education of Limited English Proficient and Recent Immigrant Students: Provisions in the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001
The Language Acquisition State Grant Program under Title III of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (ESEA) as amended by the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLBA) contains provisions intended to address the specific educational needs of limited English proficient (LEP) students and students who have recently immigrated to the United States.1 Title III represents a major overhaul of federal programs for LEP students formerly provided under ESEA, Title VII, Parts A and C. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7368/
Emergency Supplemental Appropriations for Hurricane Katrina Relief
This CRS report summarizes federal disaster assistance funding legislation in the 109th Congress and presents some information on federal expenditures and obligations for disaster recovery activities. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7358/
FY2006 Appropriations for State and Local Homeland Security
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The U.S. Intelligence Budget: A Basic Overview
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CONTOMS (Counter Narcotics and Terrorism Operational Medical Support Program)
Since the September 11th terrorist attack, greater attention has focused on federal, state, and local readiness to respond to situations involving terrorism or weapons of mass destruction (WMD). One such federal program that provided federal support to local law enforcement and first responders is CONTOMS (Counter Narcotics and Terrorism Operational Medical Support). digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7001/
Farm Commodity Programs: A Short Primer
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Rural Education: Legislative Initiatives
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Suspension of Budget Enforcement Procedures During Hostilities Abroad
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The Budget Reconciliation Process: House and Senate Procedures
The budget reconciliation process is an optional procedure that operates as an adjunct to the budget resolution process established by the Congressional Budget Act of 1974. The chief purpose of the reconciliation process is to enhance Congress’s ability to change current law in order to bring revenue, spending, and debt-limit levels into conformity with the policies of the annual budget resolution. Reconciliation is a two-stage process. First, reconciliation directives are included in the budget resolution, instructing the appropriate committees to develop legislation achieving the desired budgetary outcomes. The second step involves consideration of the resultant reconciliation legislation by the House and Senate under expedited procedures. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7304/
Adult Education and Literacy: Overview and Reauthorization Proposals of the 109th Congress
The 109th Congress is considering the reauthorization of federal adult education and literacy programs. The Adult Education and Family Literacy Act (AEFLA) authorized these programs through FY2003. The primary AEFLA activity is a state grant program that supports education and literacy services for educationally disadvantaged adults. The AEFLA also authorizes national leadership activities in adult education and literacy, and the National Institute for Literacy. The FY2005 AEFLA appropriation is $585 million; the FY2006 budget request would reduce funding to $216 million. The AEFLA was enacted as Title II of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (WIA), P.L. 105-220, on August 7, 1998. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7291/
Authorization and Appropriations for FY2005: Defense
This report is a guide to one of the 13 regular appropriations bills that Congress passes each year. It is designed to supplement the information provided by the House and Senate Appropriations Subcommittees on Energy and Water. It summarizes the current legislative status of the bill, its scope, major issues, funding levels, and related legislative activity. The report lists the key CRS staff relevant to the issues covered and related CRS products. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7105/
Trio and GEAR UP Programs: Status and Issues
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Federal Budget Process Reform: Analysis of Five Reform Issues
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First Responder Initiative: Policy Issues and Options
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Baseline Budget Projections: A Discussion of Issues
Between January 2001 and January 2005, the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) reduced its 10-year baseline projection for the period 2002-2011 from a peak surplus of $5.6 trillion to a deficit of $2.6 trillion for three reasons. First, about one third of the reduction is due to technical revisions CBO made to its projections (e.g., to account for the smaller than predicted growth in tax revenues). Second, the recession both reduced revenues and raised outlays automatically. This factor accounts for less than one-tenth of the 10-year decline, and is only significant in 2002 and 2003. Finally, about 60% of the reduction was due to policy changes, the largest of which was tax cuts, and the second largest of which was increased military outlays. Even without a recession or technical revisions, policy changes alone would have pushed the budget into deficit from 2003 to 2005. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7266/
V-22 Osprey Tilt-Rotor Aircraft
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Federal Emergency Management Agency Funding for Homeland Security and Other Activities
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The Federal Migrant Education Program as Amended by the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001
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The Economics of the Federal Budget Deficit
In FY1998, federal budget receipts exceeded outlays for the first time since 1969. Those surpluses continued through FY2001. At one time, those surpluses had been projected to continue, but conditions have since changed. The economy went into recession in 2001, and a stimulus package was enacted. Since then, the budget has been in deficit. The actual unified budget deficit for FY2004 was $412.1 billion. In January 2005, the Congressional Budget Office projected that there would be a budget deficit of $368 billion in FY2005, and a deficit of $295 billion in FY2006. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7264/
Emergency Funding for Agriculture: A Brief History of Supplemental Appropriations, FY1989-FY2005
From FY1989 through FY2005 (to date), 31 appropriations, authorization, or farm disaster acts added approximately $53.2 billion in supplemental funding for U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) programs (excluding the Forest Service, which is funded annually under the Interior appropriations bill). Nearly $41 billion, or 77% of the total amount, was for FY1999-FY2005 alone. Two FY2005 supplementals have been enacted to date, the largest of which was a disaster relief package in response to the 2004 hurricanes and other natural disasters, which included $3.5 billion for agricultural losses (attached to the FY2005 Military Construction Appropriations Act (P.L. 108-324)). digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7262/
The Budget Reconciliation Process: The Senate's "Byrd" Rule
Reconciliation is a procedure under the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 by which Congress implements budget resolution policies affecting mainly permanent spending and revenue programs. The principal focus in the reconciliation process has been deficit reduction, but in recent years reconciliation has encompassed revenue reduction generally and spending increases in selected program areas. The Byrd rule provides six definitions of what constitutes extraneous matter for purposes of the rule (and several exceptions thereto), but the term is generally described as covering provisions unrelated to achieving the goals of the reconciliation instructions. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7261/
The Budget Reconciliation Process: The Senate's "Byrd" Rule
Reconciliation is a procedure under the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 by which Congress implements budget resolution policies affecting mainly permanent spending and revenue programs. The principal focus in the reconciliation process has been deficit reduction, but in recent years reconciliation has encompassed revenue reduction generally and spending increases in selected program areas. The Byrd rule provides six definitions of what constitutes extraneous matter for purposes of the rule (and several exceptions thereto), but the term is generally described as covering provisions unrelated to achieving the goals of the reconciliation instructions. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7099/
Broadband Internet Access and the Digital Divide: Federal Assistance Programs
Some policymakers, believing that disparities in broadband access across American society could have adverse economic and social consequences on those left behind, assert that the federal government should play a more active role to avoid a “digital divide” in broadband access. One approach is for the federal government to provide financial assistance to support broadband deployment in underserved areas. Others, however, believe that federal assistance for broadband deployment is not appropriate. Some opponents question the reality of the “digital divide,” and argue that federal intervention in the broadband marketplace would be premature and, in some cases, counterproductive. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7260/
The National Debt: Who Bears Its Burden?
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The Budget Reconciliation Process: Timing of Legislative Action
Reconciliation is a procedure under the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 by which Congress implements budget resolution policies affecting mainly permanent spending and revenue programs. The principal focus in the reconciliation process has been deficit reduction, but in recent years reconciliation has encompassed revenue reduction generally and spending increases in selected program areas. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7255/
Item Veto and Expanded Impoundment Proposals
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Amtrak: Budget and Reauthorization
Amtrak was created by Congress in 1970 to provide intercity passenger railroad service. Without a yearly federal grant to cover operating losses, Amtrak would not survive as presently configured. This issue brief discusses reform proposals from both the Administration and Amtrak in the 109th Congress. It addresses the appropriations requested by Amtrak, the reluctance of the Administration to provide aid, and its willingness to let Amtrak enter bankruptcy, resulting in restructuring and reform of inefficient operations. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7251/
Introduction to the Federal Budget Process
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Earmarks and Limitations in Appropriations Bills
An annual appropriations act is generally made up of separate paragraphs, each of which provides funding for specific agencies and programs. Generally, each paragraph corresponds to a unique account and provides appropriations for multiple projects and purposes as a single lump sum. Earmarks and limitations are two devices regularly used in annual appropriations acts to restrict, or more precisely direct, the availability of funds for specific projects or purposes of an account. Sometimes an earmark or a limitation may generate more interest or controversy than the total appropriation. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7096/
The Largest Spending Programs in the Federal Budget: FY2002 Outlays Over $10 Billion
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Points of Order in the Congressional Budget Process
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